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Download That Moaning Saxophone: The Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze ePub

by Bruce Vermazen

Download That Moaning Saxophone: The Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze ePub
  • ISBN 0195165926
  • ISBN13 978-0195165920
  • Language English
  • Author Bruce Vermazen
  • Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2004)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats mobi docx txt mbr
  • Category Medicine
  • Subcategory Medicine
  • Size ePub 1795 kb
  • Size Fb2 1688 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 136

Today, the saxophone is an emblem of "cool" and the instrument most closely associated with jazz. Yet not long ago it was derided as the "Siren of Satan," and it was largely ignored in the United States for well over half a century after its invention. When it was first widely heard, it was often viewed as a novelty noisemaker, not a real musical instrument. In only a few short years, however, saxophones appeared in music shops across America and became one of the most important instrumental voices. How did the saxophone get from comic to cool?Bandleader Tom Brown claimed that it was his saxophone sextet, the Six Brown Brothers, who inaugurated the craze. While this boast was perhaps more myth than reality, the group was indisputably one of the most famous musical acts on stage in the early twentieth century. Starting in traveling circuses, small-time vaudeville, and minstrel shows, the group trekked across the United States and Europe, bringing this new sound to the American public. Through their live performances and groundbreaking recordings--the first discs of a saxophone ensemble in general circulation--the Six Brown Brothers played a crucial role in making this new instrument familiar to and loved by a wide audience.In That Moaning Saxophone, author and cornet player Bruce Vermazen sifts fact from legend in this craze and tells the remarkable story of these six musical brothers--William, Tom, Alec, Percy, Vern, and Fred. Vermazen traces the brothers' path through minstrelsy, the circus, burlesque, vaudeville, and Broadway musical comedy. Cleverly weaving together biographical details and the context of the burgeoning entertainment business, the author draws fascinating portraits of the pre-jazz world of American popular music, the theatrical climate of the period, and the long, slow death of vaudeville.Delving into the career of one of the key popularizers of the saxophone, That Moaning Saxophone not only illuminates the history of this novel instrument, but also offers a witty and vivid portrayal of these forgotten musical worlds.

Oxford university press.

Oxford university press. he Six Brown Brothers were saxophonists, famous throughout the United States, Canada, and Australia during their quarter-century on the vaudeville and musical comedy stages. Playing the hit tunes of the day, they marched, even danced, across the boards, and Tom Brown, the leader, raised waves of laughter with his blackface mime and the repertoire of extramusical sounds he coaxed from his alto and soprano saxophones.

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Home Browse Books Book details, That Moaning Saxophone: The Six Brown . Vermazen traces the brothers' path through minstrelsy, the circus, burlesque, vaudeville, and Broadway musical comedy.

Home Browse Books Book details, That Moaning Saxophone: The Six Brown Brothers. Today, the saxophone is an emblem of "cool" and the instrument most closely associated with jazz. Yet not long ago it was derided as the "Siren of Satan," and it was largely ignored in the United States for well over half a century after its invention.

The saxophone, today an emblem of cool and the instrument most associated with jazz, was largely ignored in the . My question exactly when I saw a copy of Bruce Vermazen's "That Moaning Saxophone: the Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze" (Oxford, 2004)

The saxophone, today an emblem of cool and the instrument most associated with jazz, was largely ignored in the . for well over a half-century after its invention in France in 1838. Bringing this new sound to the American public was the Six Brown Brothers. My question exactly when I saw a copy of Bruce Vermazen's "That Moaning Saxophone: the Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze" (Oxford, 2004). I gave it a try and found it fascinating reading. Of course, I am most interested in the history of American music.

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This book is about the Six Brown Brothers, a musical act on the burlesque, vaudeville, minstrel, and Broadway stages (1911-33) that was once reputed to have initiated the "saxophone craze" of the 1910s and 1920s.

The Six Brown Brothers, later known as the Five Brown Brothers, were a Canadian vaudeville era saxophone sextet consisting of six brothers. They were known for their comedic musical acts as well as their many recordings. They performed as clowns with white makeup and one in blackface. Their performances include ragtime and minstrel group acts. The brothers comprising the Six Brown Brothers were, William, Tom (1881–1950), Alec, Percy, Fred, and Vern Brown.

That Moaning Saxophone: The Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze," by Bruce J. Vermazen. In: ARSC Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2, pp. 257-259. View it in the Music Periodicals Database.

Talk about That Moaning Saxophone: The Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze


Cobandis
An amazing piece of research that in Vermazen's vivid writeup brings back the whole story of vaudeville at its height and in its decline. I started reading with zero interest in saxophones and never having heard of the Brown Brothers. At the end I was mourning as at the demise of a beloved close relative.
Broadraven
> Why should anyone want to read a book about a once popular vaudeville act that almost no one today remembers? My question exactly when I saw a copy of Bruce Vermazen's "That Moaning Saxophone: the Six Brown Brothers and the Dawning of a Musical Craze" (Oxford, 2004). I gave it a try and found it fascinating reading.

Of course, I am most interested in the history of American music. And while the actual story of a certain Saxophone sextet act is not in itself totally engrossing, their story is the story of all vaudeville acts that had their glory days and finally were squeezed out of existence by something called the motion picture. Indeed, the final chapters almost brought a tear to the eye as the Brown Brothers (well, not exactly the original six by any means but the act that went under that name) found the market for their incredible talents become more and more restricted as they had to share billing with films because so many of the old vaudeville houses had converted to movie theaters.The summary of the book on this website provides you with many details covered by the author, so let that suffice.

The 214 pages of text are followed by many more of notes, discography, and two indexes. A must read for anyone interested in the never really Good Old Days of live performers who could not survive the march of science in its most commercial aspects.
Ffan
I am currently studying the history of jazz in grad school at Dartmouth, and nothing proved to be more informative or inspired than Vermazen's book. Read it. It is a key resource for best understanding this American cultural entity. Not only is it beautifully written, but "That Moaning Saxophone" inspires one to read, cook, drive, and relax to the sound of the sax and jazz. Looking forward to Maestro Vermazen's next insightful piece, and impatiently awaiting it's coverage on NPR, Kevin Ramos-Glew