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Download Mortality ePub

by Christopher Hitchens

Download Mortality ePub
  • ISBN 0771039220
  • ISBN13 978-0771039225
  • Language English
  • Author Christopher Hitchens
  • Publisher Signal; First edition (September 4, 2012)
  • Pages 128
  • Formats lrf mobi docx mbr
  • Category Medicine
  • Subcategory Medicine
  • Size ePub 1483 kb
  • Size Fb2 1832 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 588

Based on his columns in Vanity Fair that chronicled his year-and-a-half battle with esophageal cancer, Mortality is Christopher Hitchens at his most honest and reflective . Thoughtfully meditating on the harrowing effects of illness and treatment on the body, and on the impermanence and acceptance of a life ending, Mortality is Hitchens' magnum opus, and in true Hitchens form, he has the last word.

Also by christopher hitchens. Foreword by Graydon Carter. Afterword by Carol Blue. First published in Australia and New Zealand by Allen & Unwin in 2012.

Also by christopher hitchens. Hostage to History: Cyprus from the Ottomans to Kissinger. Blood, Class, and Nostalgia: Anglo-American Ironies.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. On June 8, 2010, while on a book tour for his bestselling memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens was stricken in his New York hotel room with excruciating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of award-winning columns for Vanity Fair.

On June 8, 2010, while on a book tour for his bestselling memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens was stricken in his New York hotel room with excruciating pain in his chest and thorax

On June 8, 2010, while on a book tour for his bestselling memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens was stricken in his New York hotel room with excruciating pain in his chest and thorax. As he would later write in the first of a series of award-winning columns for "Vanity Fair," he suddenly found himself being deported "from the country of the well across the stark frontier On June 8, 2010, while on a book tour for his bestselling memoir, Hitch-22, Christopher Hitchens was stricken in his New York hotel room with excruciating pain in.

Christopher Eric Hitchens (13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011) was an English-American author, columnist, essayist, orator, journalist, and social critic. A staple of public discourse, his confrontational style of debate made him both a lauded public intellectual and a controversial public figure.

Mortality is a 2012, posthumously published book by Anglo-American writer Christopher Hitchens, comprising seven essays which first appeared in Vanity Fair concerning his struggle with oesophageal cancer.

Mortality is a 2012, posthumously published book by Anglo-American writer Christopher Hitchens, comprising seven essays which first appeared in Vanity Fair concerning his struggle with oesophageal cancer, with which he was diagnosed during his 2010 book tour and which killed him in December 2011.

Christopher Hitchens began his memoir, Hitch-22, on a note of grim amusement at finding himself described in a British National Portrait Gallery publication as the late Christopher Hitchens. He wrote, So there it is in cold print, the plain unadorned phrase that will one day become unarguably true.

Christopher Hitchens's own pieces are shaped like a fugue; the theme is death, his own death, and the voice in each piece changes slightly as death comes closer. Hitchens is only 61. It is clear that he will give anything to live. I had real plans for the next decade. He begins simply with the theme: "I have more than once in my time woken up feeling like death. But nothing prepared me for the early morning in June when I came to consciousness feeling as if I were actually shackled to my own corpse.

Christopher Hitchens. Author: Christopher Hitchens. Publisher: Allen & Unwin, Sydney, 2012. Mortality is the anti-Last Lecture: Stripping away semantics and sentimentality, Hitchens treats his cancer as he would any other topic-with dogged inquisitiveness and brutal honesty. Which makes it all the more poignant when he begins losing his voice, his freedom of speech, and sinks deeper into his year of living dyingly.

by Christopher Hitchens. One - Putting It Mildly. 03. Two - Religion Kills. and forthright, Christopher Hitchens stood out as a man determined to do just that. In his younger years. 42 MB·446 Downloads·New! and forthright, Christopher Hitchens stood out as a man determined to do just that. The Portable Atheist.

Talk about Mortality


Laizel
I had the pleasure of corresponding briefly with Christopher Hitchens a few years before he died, and although I never had the pleasure of meeting him in person, I felt his death was a particularly painful loss for this world. Many of these essays are republished in slightly edited form from articles he wrote in Vanity Fair, but reading them now offered a new emotional meaning for me.

In them, while Hitchens remains politically sharp and critical of religion, there is also a deeper reflection that is not possible except when writing on the only subject that really matters: life itself. He describes what it was like being diagnosed with esophageal cancer (the same type that killed his father) that had metastasized before it was even discovered. Soon, he begins chemotherapy and in the process loses his hair, body mass, ability for physical intimacy, and strength. It is made most real in those moments he discusses losing even the ability to grow five o'clock shadow. The worst deprivation, however, is the intermittent loss of his voice. While he admits it is occasionally hard to think while a needle pumps strong poison into one's arm, he fortunately never lost his ability to write.

In total, there are seven previously published essays. Besides the first one announcing the cancer's early stages, the best essay in the collection is his one on Friedrich Nietzsche. It also happens to be the last one he published before he died. After that, the book includes some final, random jottings; little bits of fleece he shed here and there that were collected into a fine coat. The last writing in the book comes from Carol Blue, his wife of many years, and she reveals a side of him that many did not get to see.

I cannot say this is a book I enjoyed reading because it was born from the death of a very fine man. It is, however, the best tombstone a man of his talents could offer.
Goktilar
In his remarkable book Mortality, Christopher Hitchens wrote a dispassionate, clear, frightening and inspiring account of his decline toward death from esophageal cancer. His writing brings the reader into his hotel room when he was first struck down. He takes us along as the emergency services people took him in a “. . . very gentle and firm deportation . . . from the country of the well across the stark frontier that marks off the land of malady.” He never whines or seeks pity. “I have decided to take whatever my disease can throw at me, and to stay combative even while taking the measure of my inevitable decline.” He went on to say “I repeat, this is no more than what a healthy person has to do in slower motion.” His calm stoicism in the face of the worst diagnosis followed by the worst kind of suffering from treatments, rather than being terrifying and depressing is somehow comforting. Listening to the audio of the book when I was going through a personal crisis made me feel like I was facing death with a brother in arms who made me feel as the protagonist in Abba’s “Fernando” must have felt when “there was something in the air that night”—like whatever may come I’m with the right person at the right time and all is well.
Books about dying are hardly upbeat, but Hitchens kept his humor throughout the ordeal and never lost his famous ability for clarity and engaging the reader. A good read on a hard subject.
Lianeni
This week, I read an autobiography entitled, "MORTALITY," by one of my favorite authors, Christopher Hitchens. This biography held a bit of a strange format for me, because it was written from the point of view of a prominent atheist writer/columnist that had just been diagnosed with terminal esophageal cancer. The (admittedly short) biography that would follow was full of humility, admittance of mortality, and wry humor. Anyone who knows Hitchens work knows that he was a commanding orator, as well as a staggering (and oft times acerbic) conductor of the English language.
This book bleakly depicts his swift acquiesce to the disease. Painfully, it points out his loss of speech, ability to form a collective thought, and eventual loss of ability to write altogether. He sees the irony in this: "the blasphemous atheist stricken with throat cancer," etc, etc. But what I found most compelling about this book was the very last chapter. The last chapter is filled with his notes on how the book came to be. An idea scribbled between agonizing treatments or glad-handed meetings. Seeds planted in an ailing mind. No paragraph is longer than two sentences. Having been a first hand spectator to cancer, I can attest to the 'wide eyed' energy that comes to the patient in short waves. To me, it was an easy reminder of my own humanity to read these notes, and see their cohesiveness slip as time progressed.
Hitchens, who died peacefully at a hospice facility on 12/15/2011 (my 26th birthday) argued that atheism gave us a sense of urgency. Our actions do not, in fact echo in eternity; so it is always up to us to be fair minded, philanthropic, and always skeptical citizens in a world that tries to make us anything but. Nothing is guaranteed, so do the most you can with what you have, while you can. Hitchens never apologized for the lifestyle that likely led to his cancer, nor does he blame any deity for it's heredity (his father died of the same malady.)
One review called this book a "crash course in humanity." I call it a rare glimpse into a person that really dives into their fate, and unflinchingly tries to convey appreciation for the beauty of living a fully cognizant life.