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by Frederick F. Cartwright,Michael Biddiss

Download Disease And History ePub
  • ISBN 0756778387
  • ISBN13 978-0756778385
  • Language English
  • Author Frederick F. Cartwright,Michael Biddiss
  • Publisher Diane Pub Co; Revised edition (April 1, 2000)
  • Pages 230
  • Formats lrf docx doc rtf
  • Category Medicine
  • Subcategory Medicine
  • Size ePub 1499 kb
  • Size Fb2 1678 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 186

Famine, pestilence, and war, often feeding on each other, have challenged mankind throughout time. This book explores the impact of disease on the great events in history, demonstrating that even the most powerful individuals and societies can be and have been fatally weakened by disease. Plagues drained the strength of Ancient Athens and Rome. In the 14th century, The Black Death devastated Europe, signalling the end of feudalism and provoking the rise of dissident sects from within the church. Venereal disease could have prevented Henry VIII from securing the male heir he so desperately wanted, and certainly caused the insanity which afflicted Ivan the Terrible. In Mexico, smallpox was Cortez's most powerful ally against the Aztecs, while Queen Victoria transmitted haemophilia to her heirs, and consequently contributed to the collapse of the Russian monarchy. Each era has made some progress against physical and mental disorders, only to be faced with new and unforeseen threats. We, no less than other generations, are vulnerable to widespread outbreaks of disease.

Frederick F. Cartwright, Michael D. Biddiss. This book is and interesting look at how disease has impacted the unfolding of history

Frederick F. This book gives us a very interesting tour through diseases in history, and the role they have played in it all along. You can see how they spread, how people dealed with them, how they were puzzled by them, etc. It's not a subject that appeals every reader, but if you want to wander in the terrain of health and disease in history, this is a good book indeed. This book is and interesting look at how disease has impacted the unfolding of history. Some of the material is conjectual as it is alomost impossible to make diagnosis of a person long dead.

Michael Biddiss is Emeritus Professor of History and former Dean of Letters and Social Sciences at The University . Diseases have influenced the course of history in many ways. This 1972 book of 248 pages has only a selection, much has been omitted

Michael Biddiss is Emeritus Professor of History and former Dean of Letters and Social Sciences at The University of Reading. Each was President of the Faculty of the History of Medicine at the Society of Apothecaries of London, during 1980-1 and 1994-8 respectively. This 1972 book of 248 pages has only a selection, much has been omitted. There are no reference notes but a bibliography for each of the 9 chapters. Historians and doctors both study the impact of disease upon history (‘Introduction’). Primitive man lived in tribes such as in some remote jungles today.

Cartwright, Frederick Fox; Biddiss, Michael D. (Michael Denis), 1942 . Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. (Michael Denis), 1942-. Epidemiology - history, History of Medicine, Epidemiology, Medicine, Epidemics, Diseases and history. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on February 24, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

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Created April 29, 2008.

Article in Medical history 47(1):141-142 · January 2003. Cite this publication. Frederick F Cartwright and Michael Biddiss, Disease and history, 2nd e. Thrupp, Sutton Publishing, 2000, pp. viii, 230, illus. £2. 0 (hardback 0-7509-2315). Volume 47 Issue 1 - Samiksha Sehrawat.

Frederick Cartwright and Michael Biddiss illustrate all the ways in which diseases have posed as the Horseman of the Apocalypse. In each chapter the authors visit different diseases and the effects they had on various cultures. They distinguish between diseases, which are from insects such as malaria, yellow fever, and sleeping sickness. They also describe diseases that are from bacteria and viruses. Some of these include smallpox, tuberculosis, cholera, and typhoid

AbeBooks Michael Biddiss is Emeritus Professor of History and former Dean of Letters and Social Sciences at The University of Reading.

Michael Biddiss is Emeritus Professor of History and former Dean of Letters and Social Sciences at The University of Reading.

товар 3 Disease and History, Cartwright, Frederick . Good Condition, Book -Disease and History, Cartwright . Good Condition, Book -Disease and History, Cartwright, Frederick . Good Condition, Book. 446,09 RUB. + 792,70 RUB за доставку. This book covers a number of situations where disease has impacted history-for example, the black death in Europe and Napoleon's retreat from Russia due at least in part, to typhus infections of his troops. It's a good book that I wish would be updated to bring it more current. оставлен gabrieljantzi21.

by Frederick F. Cartwright. This book is well written and provides decent information on a number of historical case studies where disease had an effect on history-and politics. Early on, the author notes the focus of this book: "The object. is to study the area in which doctor and historian inevitably meet, that of the impact of disease upon history. The first case study is "Disease in the ancient world. Some of the examples-the plague that decimated the Athenians during the Peloponnesian War; the series of plagues afflicting Rome.

Talk about Disease And History


Doriel
This is one of those books I stumbled over while reading the end notes of another tome, and I'm glad I did. I've always had an interest in the Black Death that swept Europe in the 14th century, and the Spanish influenza which struck almost a century ago now, so I bought this book to see what it had to say on my "favorites." However, it greatly expanded my horizons by talking about such topics as the spread of measles and small pox to the New World, and the advent of venereal diseases and what that meant to England (Henry VIII) and Russia (Ivan the Terrible). The authors even speculate that Joan of Arc's visions might have been due to an inner ear problem. And, they address the mass psychological disorder that produced the Nazis.

While I was certainly more interested in some topics than in others, perhaps the most fortunate thing about this book is that it's co-authored by a doctor and an historian, so the writing is generally crisp and knowledgeable without getting bogged down in medical terms. It provides a great deal of context to what diseases have done to society over the centuries, gives the reader much to speculate about, and was interesting reading from first page to last. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
you secret
Excellent book on medical history and especially good essays on epidemics throughout history. I am using it in a class as a textbook.
Ranenast
Disease and History

Diseases have influenced the course of history in many ways. This 1972 book of 248 pages has only a selection, much has been omitted. There are no reference notes but a bibliography for each of the 9 chapters. Historians and doctors both study the impact of disease upon history (‘Introduction’). Primitive man lived in tribes such as in some remote jungles today. They ate a high carbohydrate diet which leads to early obesity, suffered from uncurable diseases, and had a high infant mortality rate (p.2). Civilization brought benefits but also hazards (p.3). Famine, war, or pestilence were always a threat. This very readable book tells about some diseases. [War is not “a mass psychotic disorder” but a way to grab wealth or possessions from others. Wars come upon people like an epidemic of disease.]

Chapter 1 discusses disease in the Ancient World. The plague of Athens (like scarlet fever) led to their downfall. Rome built a sewage system, a pure water supply, and clean streets. Their Empire was widespread, but this allowed the spread of new diseases (p.11). Malaria led to the downfall of Rome. There were recurrent plagues (p.12). Hippocrates is regarded as the founder of medicine (p.20). He taught that disease was not a punishment from the gods. Nursing the sick was a Christian duty (p.23). Galen acquired a great reputation, his teachings were followed for over a thousand years (p.27).

Chapter 2 discusses “The Black Death”. The bubonic plague that is most deadly in its pneumonic form. The three years of wet and cold summers in 1346-1348 resulted in malnutrition and reduced resistance to disease (p.36). The deaths marked the greatest catastrophe in European history. This led to higher wages and better working conditions (p.44). The Wars of the Roses ended the old feudal aristocracy in England (p.45). This plague mysteriously disappeared from Europe in the 18th century (p.52).

Chapter 3 discusses the emergence of syphilis in Europe. Yaws and syphilis are bacteriologically indistinguishable (p.60). Many examples are cited to show how a sick ruler brings unhappiness to his subjects. Penicillin was shown to be a cure in 1943, until penicillin-resistant organisms emerged (p.81). Chapter 4 discusses typhus, spread by lice among people who are unwashed, wearing the same clothes, and herded closely together (p.83). This disease decimated Napoleon’s Grand Army in 1812. A famine or poverty is needed for its spread (p.84). Pages 90 to 102 explain the failure of Napoleon’s War of 1812. The rest of this chapter provides a medical analysis of Napoleon, who was poisoned by small doses of arsenic (p.112).

Chapter 5 discusses the diseases developed in civilized countries that were transmitted to less developed countries. A new disease will cause more deaths because of lesser immunity. A smallpox epidemic helped Cortez to conquer Mexico. In the late 19th century a British ship visited the Fiji islands. The result was a measles epidemic that killed 25% of the population (p.135). Chapter 6 tells about the diseases of Africa spread by mosquitoes and tsetse flies: malaria, yellow fever, and sleeping sickness. This prevented exploration of this continent (p.138). Malaria attacked people in Greece and Italy (p.142). Quinine effectively prevents malaria (p.144). Dynastic marriages transmitted the hereditary disease of hemophilia A, where blood doesn’t clot normally (Chapter 7). But claiming this caused the end of the Romanoff dynasty ignores everything else that was happening. Other royal houses in Europe also ended by 1919.

Chapter 8 discusses “Mass Suggestion” as a psychiatric disease. People tend to copy one another (p.201). Is there another explanation for the “dancing mania” of the Middle Ages (p.202)? Why did the Renaissance create a “witch hysteria” (p.204)? Cartwright needs to learn more about the Salem witchcraft trials (p.206). They ended when the plainly innocent were accused. Cartwright’s analysis of Hitler fails to mention the forces that backed him for political and economic purposes (p.208). Given the previous good news, the loss of World War I created a panic in Germany. The economic situation became worse (p.209). [No mention of the ruling class of the aristocracy and industrialists that put Hitler into power (p.213).]

Chapter 9 discusses “Man-made Problems of the Present and Future”. Thalidomide seemed to be a safe sedative in 1956. Then phocomelia broke out in West Germany. Heating homes results in air pollution, so too automobiles (p.218). The canyon-like streets of New York attracts pollution (p.220). Elsewhere chemicals can harm fish and animals (p221). Nitrate fertilizers can poison young children (p.223). The use of DDT causes a build-up in humans (p.224). Noise is another form of pollution (p.226). The authors show an anti-human outlook in predicting disaster in future decades (p.236). Can you believe them? The past forty years mock their predictions: “global war would inevitably result” (p.237). [This last chapter is lessened by their political outlook.]
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
Disease and History

Diseases have influenced the course of history in many ways. This 1972 book of 248 pages has only a selection, much has been omitted. There are no reference notes but a bibliography for each of the 9 chapters. Historians and doctors both study the impact of disease upon history (‘Introduction’). Primitive man lived in tribes such as in some remote jungles today. They ate a high carbohydrate diet which leads to early obesity, suffered from uncurable diseases, and had a high infant mortality rate (p.2). Civilization brought benefits but also hazards (p.3). Famine, war, or pestilence were always a threat. This very readable book tells about some diseases. [War is not “a mass psychotic disorder” but a way to grab wealth or possessions from others. Wars come upon people like an epidemic of disease.]

Chapter 1 discusses disease in the Ancient World. The plague of Athens (like scarlet fever) led to their downfall. Rome built a sewage system, a pure water supply, and clean streets. Their Empire was widespread, but this allowed the spread of new diseases (p.11). Malaria led to the downfall of Rome. There were recurrent plagues (p.12). Hippocrates is regarded as the founder of medicine (p.20). He taught that disease was not a punishment from the gods. Nursing the sick was a Christian duty (p.23). Galen acquired a great reputation, his teachings were followed for over a thousand years (p.27).

Chapter 2 discusses “The Black Death”. The bubonic plague that is most deadly in its pneumonic form. The three years of wet and cold summers in 1346-1348 resulted in malnutrition and reduced resistance to disease (p.36). The deaths marked the greatest catastrophe in European history. This led to higher wages and better working conditions (p.44). The Wars of the Roses ended the old feudal aristocracy in England (p.45). This plague mysteriously disappeared from Europe in the 18th century (p.52).

Chapter 3 discusses the emergence of syphilis in Europe. Yaws and syphilis are bacteriologically indistinguishable (p.60). Many examples are cited to show how a sick ruler brings unhappiness to his subjects. Penicillin was shown to be a cure in 1943, until penicillin-resistant organisms emerged (p.81). Chapter 4 discusses typhus, spread by lice among people who are unwashed, wearing the same clothes, and herded closely together (p.83). This disease decimated Napoleon’s Grand Army in 1812. A famine or poverty is needed for its spread (p.84). Pages 90 to 102 explain the failure of Napoleon’s War of 1812. The rest of this chapter provides a medical analysis of Napoleon, who was poisoned by small doses of arsenic (p.112).

Chapter 5 discusses the diseases developed in civilized countries that were transmitted to less developed countries. A new disease will cause more deaths because of lesser immunity. A smallpox epidemic helped Cortez to conquer Mexico. In the late 19th century a British ship visited the Fiji islands. The result was a measles epidemic that killed 25% of the population (p.135). Chapter 6 tells about the diseases of Africa spread by mosquitoes and tsetse flies: malaria, yellow fever, and sleeping sickness. This prevented exploration of this continent (p.138). Malaria attacked people in Greece and Italy (p.142). Quinine effectively prevents malaria (p.144). Dynastic marriages transmitted the hereditary disease of hemophilia A, where blood doesn’t clot normally (Chapter 7). But claiming this caused the end of the Romanoff dynasty ignores everything else that was happening. Other royal houses in Europe also ended by 1919.

Chapter 8 discusses “Mass Suggestion” as a psychiatric disease. People tend to copy one another (p.201). Is there another explanation for the “dancing mania” of the Middle Ages (p.202)? Why did the Renaissance create a “witch hysteria” (p.204)? Cartwright needs to learn more about the Salem witchcraft trials (p.206). They ended when the plainly innocent were accused. Cartwright’s analysis of Hitler fails to mention the forces that backed him for political and economic purposes (p.208). Given the previous good news, the loss of World War I created a panic in Germany. The economic situation became worse (p.209). [No mention of the ruling class of the aristocracy and industrialists that put Hitler into power (p.213).]

Chapter 9 discusses “Man-made Problems of the Present and Future”. Thalidomide seemed to be a safe sedative in 1956. Then phocomelia broke out in West Germany. Heating homes results in air pollution, so too automobiles (p.218). The canyon-like streets of New York attracts pollution (p.220). Elsewhere chemicals can harm fish and animals (p221). Nitrate fertilizers can poison young children (p.223). The use of DDT causes a build-up in humans (p.224). Noise is another form of pollution (p.226). The authors show an anti-human outlook in predicting disaster in future decades (p.236). Can you believe them? The past forty years mock their predictions: “global war would inevitably result” (p.237). [This last chapter is lessened by their political outlook.]