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Download The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are ePub

by Robert Wright

Download The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are ePub
  • ISBN 0349107041
  • ISBN13 978-0349107042
  • Language English
  • Author Robert Wright
  • Publisher Time Warner Books Uk; New edition edition (May 2004)
  • Pages 466
  • Formats lrf lrf doc txt
  • Category Medicine
  • Subcategory Psychology
  • Size ePub 1176 kb
  • Size Fb2 1898 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 137

THE MORAL ANIMAL examines the significance of this extraordinary shift in our perception of morality and what it means to be human. Taking the life of Charles Darwin as his context, Robert Wright brilliantly demonstrates how Darwin's ideas have stood the test of time, drawing startling conclusions about the structure of some of our most basic preoccupations. Why do we commit adultery, express suicidal tendencies and have the capacity for self-deception? Wright not only provides the answers to such fundamental moral questions from the perspective of evolutionary psychology but challenges us to see ourselves anew through the clarifying lens of this fledgling and exciting science.

Namely, the parts detailing Darwin's life.

Robert Wright's "The Moral Animal" changed all this. Part of what brought this about is the fact that Wright is such a clear and lucid writer. Frankly, had this book been written by someone of lesser skills with explanation, I probably would've put it down. Namely, the parts detailing Darwin's life. I fully understand the literary significance of using Darwin as an example, but as a case to support Evo Psych, it seems like the writer is cherry picking events which fit his explanatory models.

The Moral Animal book. Not only are we genetically predisposed to behave in certain ways but we often go out of our way to deceive ourselves about this. We want to think of ourselves as animals with an extra part controlling the animal. This is most certainly false. We are animals capable (but not efficient) of contemplating our being an animal. Evolutionary Psychology (EP) is the new kid on the block.

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Электронная книга "The Moral Animal: Why We Are, the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology", Robert Wright. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Moral Animal: Why We Are, the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years. Wright unveils the genetic strategies behind everything from our sexual preferences to our office politics-as well as their implications for our moral codes and public policies. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 3 нояб. Are men literally born to cheat? Does monogamy actually serve women's interests? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years.

The Moral Animal is a 1994 book by Robert Wright, in which the author explores many aspects of everyday life through evolutionary biology. Robert Wright (1995-08-29). The Moral Animal: Why We Are, the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology. ISBN 978-0-679-76399-4. Booknotes interview with Wright on Moral Animal, January 8, 1995. This article about an evolution-related book is a stub.

In this work, Robert Wright examines a science that has emerged from the work of evolutionary biologists and . The New York Times selected The Moral Animal as one of the ten best books of the year and the other two as notable books of the year.

In this work, Robert Wright examines a science that has emerged from the work of evolutionary biologists and social scientists. Taking the life and work of the evolutionist Charles Darwin as his context, Wright seeks to demonstrate how Darwin's ideas have stood the test of time and retells - from the perspective of evolutionary psychology - the stories of Darwin's marriage, family, life and career. Wright is a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Essay and Criticism and has been a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Robert Wright e I have never heard her utter one word which I had rather have been unsaid. She has been my wise adviser and cheerful comforter throughout life, which without her would have been during a very long period a miserable one from ill-health

I was left inspired to discover more of his work.

I was left inspired to discover more of his work. And so, I found The Moral Animal. A remarkable, mind assessing, scientific and provocative read. Enjoy this week's book reflection @ The Hidden Why.

Authors: Robert Wright. What are - the biological roots of self-deception? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years, as well as one of the most genuinely important

Authors: Robert Wright. What are - the biological roots of self-deception? These are among the questions that have made The Moral Animal one of the most provocative science books in recent years, as well as one of the most genuinely important. As he presents the latest findings in the emerging field of evolutionary psychology - which views human behavior in light of Darwinian theory - Robert Wright unveils the unconscious strategies that shape our romantic choices, familial feelings, friendships, and office politics.

Talk about The Moral Animal: Why We Are the Way We Are


Rollers from Abdun
My education has been steeped in what many writers refer to as the "Standard Social Scientific Model" - one of the assumptions of the SSSM is that environmental and cultural influences are the dominant consideration in shaping a human life, and that a person's nature is either a secondary or non-existent consideration. Because of this, I had been very resistant for years to any book focusing on human nature, or genetic explanations for simple or complex human behavior. Robert Wright's "The Moral Animal" changed all this. Part of what brought this about is the fact that Wright is such a clear and lucid writer. Frankly, had this book been written by someone of lesser skills with explanation, I probably would've put it down. Now, in my work as a psychotherapist, I'm much more likely to think in terms of what challenges of evolutionary importance are my clients having trouble coping with, such as issues regarding status, procreation, and things that would've spelled death to our neolithic ancestors. Furthermore, another conclusion that I've reached after reading this book is that Charles Darwin is given not given enough credit in psychology writing for his brilliant insights into human feelings and behavior; this needs to change. As Darwin said, if you want to understand people, just watch a troop of baboons, if you ever have the opportunity.
Tholmeena
Excellent introduction to Evolutionary Psychology, in part because of how well written it is and also in no small measure due to the force of the ideas the author introduces. All this, despite being nearly 20 years in print.

The chapter on self-deception itself is easily worth the price of the book. In sum, it seems, despite our collective avowed love of something called “the truth”, there is apparently more survival value in dissembling, to such an extent that the inclination is now hopelessly wired into our brains. Thus, the primary role of our conscious, “rational” mind is simply to rationalize our behavior, like a good trial lawyer, not only to others, but more importantly, to ourselves as well, with effectiveness in persuading others increasing the more success you have in duping yourself.

I can’t disagree. It’s been my observation throughout most of my life and to see it laid out in print along with an evolutionary explanation for why it should be so provides confirmatory evidence, at least for me. Not only that, when you look around and see it so prevalently on the news, with talking heads, with politicians, with bosses, coworkers, friends and even with yourself, the net result is not outrage so much as a sort of resignation to the notion that this is the way things are. The obvious lesson, of course, is to attempt to train yourself to keep your eyes and ears open, knowing full well that the voice you hear in your own head is the one you are most susceptible to believing in and the one least likely to possess even a modicum of credibility. Good luck.

The one remarkable place in the book where the author illustrates this error himself is where he indicates, after hundreds of pages of demonstrating otherwise, that humans are somehow capable of stepping outside of this perspective; that simply because we are “wired” to act according to our hunter-gatherer brains, does not mean we cannot chose to do otherwise. This, on the heels of a commentary about the hollowness of the notion of “free will”.

All the same, a quite remarkable book.
Dogrel
Wright is evidently a good writer. He easily attracts the reader's attention, and takes them on a journey to understand the basics of evolutionary psychology.
The scientific content in the book is very clear and refined in order to paint a good enough picture of the foundations of evolutionary psychology, providing historical accounts and useful analogies to explain various concepts from that field of study.
My main criticism of the book is directed towards the parts which I can imagine are someone else's favorite part of the book. Namely, the parts detailing Darwin's life. I fully understand the literary significance of using Darwin as an example, but as a case to support Evo Psych, it seems like the writer is cherry picking events which fit his explanatory models. I believe simply using anthropological and psychological evidence is more appropriate to convince the reader, but I guess the writer had a different idea in mind. All in all, those parts were informative, but I found myself skimming them rather than actively reading them.
Perhaps another point I disliked about the book is how the writer claims he will always point out his sociopolitical inferences from the science, in order to not confuse the reader, but ends up adding his views about the ethical, social, and political implications of the science without clearly pointing out they are merely his personal opinions, at least not all the time.
In conclusion, Robert Wright is more than excellent in conveying the important ideas. And I believe The Moral Animal is a must read for any one who is interested in Evolutionary Psychology and the origin of human nature.
Maucage
This book will open your eyes to how humans really work and what makes them tick. Morality is a result of evolution. Every tiny bit of our "values" can be explained by science; change the conditions and polygamy or even murder could be a virtue. As Matt Ridley explains in another similar book, queen bees have to kill, as soon as they are born, other unborn queens so that they won't be born, fight and run the risk of having both queens dead. For queen bees, murder is a virtue; if they did not perform they would be acting in a highly immoral way. What a radically different view from Ten Commandments written in stone, don't you think? Only this is science and the Commandments fiction.