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Download The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size (Allen Lane Science) ePub

by Tor Norretranders

Download The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size (Allen Lane Science) ePub
  • ISBN 0713991828
  • ISBN13 978-0713991826
  • Language English
  • Author Tor Norretranders
  • Publisher Allen Lane; Hardcover edition (March 1998)
  • Pages 480
  • Formats mbr rtf txt lrf
  • Category Medicine
  • Subcategory Psychology
  • Size ePub 1646 kb
  • Size Fb2 1884 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 150


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The User Illusion book.

Tor Norretranders is the leading science writer in Denmark where THE USER ILLUSION was a bestseller. He is an award-winning author of more than ten books and hosts numerous television programmes on science-related topics. Customers who bought this item also bought.

Tor Norretranders is a Danish writer, speaker, thinker, and self-identified . These experiments had been referenced in other books I've read, but here.

Tor Norretranders is a Danish writer, speaker, thinker, and self-identified "science storyteller" who writes with "a sophistication rarely seen in popular science writing" (New York Times). These experiments had been referenced in other books I've read, but here the experiments and their implications were discussed in detail.

This groundbreaking work by Denmark's leading science writer draws on. .

This groundbreaking work by Denmark's leading science writer draws on psychology, evolutionary biology, information theory, and other disciplines to argue its revolutionary point: that consciousness represents only an infinitesimal fraction of our ability to process information. As engaging as it is insightful, this important book encourages us to rely more on what our instincts and our senses tell us so that we can better appreciate the richness of human life.

Consciousness masquerades as awareness and agency, but the sense of self it conjures is an illusion. We are stranded in the great opaque secret of our biology, and what we call subjectivity is a powerless epiphenomenon, sort of like a helpless rider on the back of a galloping horse-the view is great, but pulling on the reins does nothing. If this description of reality feels familiar to you, it’s because such a neuroscientifically inspired pessimism is a quiet but powerful strain of modern thinking

The author asserts that "what our consciousness rejects constitutes the most valuable part of ourselves," and that "we have to get outside and live life fully with all our senses to.

The author asserts that "what our consciousness rejects constitutes the most valuable part of ourselves," and that "we have to get outside and live life fully with all our senses to experience it more fully. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Although slightly out of date (the book was written in 1991; it was a bestseller in Europe), The User Illusion has been well translated and gives a refreshing, non-Anglophone take on a problem that is not likely to go away anytime soon. About the Author: Tor Nørretranders is a Danish writer, speaker, thinker, and self-identified science storyteller who writes with a sophistication rarely seen in popular science writing (New York Times).

Norretranders shows us that our understanding of the world is relative, but also that . This is the new book by Scandinavia's leading science writer. In THE GENEROUS MAN, Tor Norretranders develops an overlooked strand of Darwinian thought.

Norretranders shows us that our understanding of the world is relative, but also that we can navigate it despite our lack of understanding and shape the world so that the future will be better than if we leave it to itself. and because pessimists like myself exist, ‘Look Ahead’ is a very good book.

by Tor Norretranders. A leading Danish science writer argues that our conscious mental processes are only the surface aspect of the mind. N-rretranders begins with a history of information theory, leading up to a distinction between the quantity of information (number of bits) transmitted and the quality of communication.

The user illusion of this groundbreaking book's title comes from the computer industry and refers to the simplistic mental image most of us have of our PCs. Our consciousness, says Nrretranders, is our user illusion of ourselves. For example: In any given second, we consciously process only sixteen of the eleven million bits of information our senses pass on to our brains.

Talk about The User Illusion: Cutting Consciousness Down to Size (Allen Lane Science)


Akinohn
Sure, the author takes a while to get onto the subject of consciousness, but I found the early detour on thermodynamics and information theory to be interesting in its own right. The author a has a penchant for being scrupulously thorough in his discussion of a subject, whatever subject that may be, and I therefore found the book to be extremely satisfying. Eventually, he does find his way to the subject of consciousness, and the thorough discussion of Benjamin Libet's brain stimulation experiments was much appreciated. These experiments had been referenced in other books I've read, but here the experiments and their implications were discussed in detail. Overall, this was a great read. (Hardcopy Edition)
Clever
I recently bought and read this book convinced it was a recent work. As it turns out it is a recent translation of an original published in the early nineties and my notion was surely enforced by the number of recent books on the same "theme" namely the apparently novel revelation that the greater part of our mental activity is not directly accessible to our consciousness! This is the bottom line of such instant best-sellers as "Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior" by Leonard Mlodinow, "The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business" by Charles Duhigg, Jonah Lehrer's "Imagine: How Creativity Works" and, perhaps to a less extent, "Ignorance: How It Drives Science" by Stuart Firestein! There is clearly some trend here as James Atlas underscored it in a recent opinion column of the NYTs where he labelled these "Can't-Help-Yourself" books. That may be a bit harsh but what I find more intriguing is that all of these people appear genuinely surprised by a finding that is over 100 years old harking back to Sigmund Freud who made his fame by plunging psychology into the depths of the unconscious. Remember? In any case Tor Norretranders appears to have had one hand and a couple of decades on all these noveau retro-sensationalists and his book is a worthy read even if long and often repetitive. He covers an impressive amount of research covering the last quarter of the 20th century and manages to tie it together though the devices he introduces for the purpose are shallow and mostly misapplied. The first is the word "exformation" which is meant to designate the information that is discarded by a physical system, a correlate of Brilloin's Negentropy which was meant to label successfully eliminated entropy. Unfortunately for both it is quite self-defeating to try to define a system in terms of something that it no longer contains. The same can be said about his revival of that old William James' canard, the distinction between the I (conscious) and the Me (unconscious). Norretranders uses and abuses it to the point that these two sound more like an old married couple bickering about who is in control! Even Freud showed a bit more finesse introducing a distinction between the Ego, the Id AND the SuperEgo! Finally, his appropriation of the User Illusion, a term from software engineering, quickly fizzles maybe because the author did not really know what to do with it. Still most of the many subjects he addresses remain interesting as one can gather from this new wave of writing on the subject though my guess is that these people should have read Norretranders before they penned their own versions of his material. In spite of the problems I list the book is worth the effort or I would not have finished it.

In full disclosure I should point out that, in the middle of reading "The User Illusion" I recalled, from a particularly memorable anecdote it tells, that I have met the author -- in fact had lunch with him -- long time ago, during the first Workshop on Artificial Life in Los Alamos in 1987 or so. What little I remember of my interaction with him left me a positive impression which probably propelled my reading beyond the annoyances I describe. I recall that most of the scientists did not payed much attention to him but were quite impressed with the fact that James Gleick was also attending and he was using an intriguing new device that was to be later named a "laptop computer". Given that Gleick just published "The Information" which, again, appears to cover most of the same terrain, I can't help feel a bit more admiring of Norretranders! Unfortunately neither he nor Gleick seem to realize that the scientific notion of Information is, by itself, quite uninformative! They are not alone in this...
Ironfire
Absolutely outlook-changing for me. Having worked most of my life as a physicist, I could manage the basis of what goes on in this book (some may have trouble). I came away with a newly-integrated understanding of things.
Alsalar
The author (actually, the author & translator) did an excellent job explaining concepts in this book. I ordered the paperback but realized that this was going to be a keeper so I ordered the hardback copy. I'll give the paperback to someone who will enjoy the topics as a gift. I highly recommend this book because it is written in plain language and not full of academic bloat, although one could use this as a reference for academic reports or papers.
Gaudiker
This book should be used as educational resource material as early as it can be appreciated.... I'm almost certain that very few that have this kind of responsibility would agree with me, since it would overturn so much of the current mythology of the "I/Me".. As a species that has adopted a sort of self destructive brinkmanship as its culture, based on a simple misunderstanding of the nature of our cognitive processes, we could stand a little help with a reassessment of both where our strengths and weaknesses lie in how what we call the "I/Me" actually works...

The author has done an excellent job bringing to our attention both the miraculous and deceptive nature of perception and shows many examples of how to begin an examination of these issues for ones self, if so inclined...
Raniconne
Great book if you are trying to understand what you are without woo.
Cildorais
First, I must agree that the first hundred pages are tough going and the last chapters may get too metaphysical, but the central theme of the book that our brain presents us with a user interface much like a computer does -- delayed in time, compressed, summarized, edited, incomplete -- has not been discounted in the ten years since the book was written. In fact, more and more experiments reveal the truth of this view. In a December 2001 Nature letter (Nature 414, 302 - 305, Illusory perceptions of space and time preserve cross-saccadic perceptual continuity), another experiment showing that our unconscious gives us delayed and edited information confirms that we exist in a User Illusion. Many of our behaviors, phobias, neuroses, psychoses, and human interactions can be analyzed in terms of this powerful illusion. And learning to understand and program our unconscious is the purpose of life.
If you have consciousness, you need to understand how it works. Reading this changed everything.