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Download Via delle Oche (De Luca Trilogy, Book 3) ePub

by Michael Reynolds,Carlo Lucarelli

Download Via delle Oche (De Luca Trilogy, Book 3) ePub
  • ISBN 1933372532
  • ISBN13 978-1933372532
  • Language English
  • Author Michael Reynolds,Carlo Lucarelli
  • Publisher Europa Editions (June 3, 2008)
  • Pages 160
  • Formats docx lrf docx lrf
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Mystery
  • Size ePub 1331 kb
  • Size Fb2 1592 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 882

It is 1948. Italy's fate is soon to be decided in bitterly contested national elections. A man has been found dead in via delle Oche, at the center of Bologna's notorious red light district. The city fathers would like to disguise the man's death as a suicide. But Commissario De Luca knows better. While the man hanging from a rafter does have a noose around his neck and an overturned stool beneath him, when the stool is righted, his feet don't reach the seat. "Normal enough that a hanged man grows a little longer if he's left a while," De Luca quips. "But I've never heard of one getting shorter."As always, De Luca is unwilling to look the other way when evidence in the man's murder points to local politicians and members of the Bologna police force. The brutal worlds of crime and politics conspire once again, and in this installment of the renowned De Luca trilogy, sex for money is added into the mix. As elections creep nearer, the death count escalates with every new lead. De Luca is so close to the truth he can smell it, and it reeks of danger.

Via Delle Oche" is the final volume in what has come to be known as "The De Luca Trilogy" I got a real sense of time and place while reading these books

Via Delle Oche" is the final volume in what has come to be known as "The De Luca Trilogy". The trilogy is set in northern Italy and takes us from the closing days of WWII, (Carte Blanche (De Luca Trilogy 1)) to the turbulent years immediately after the war (The Damned Season (De Luca Trilogy 2)) until 1948, the current volume, where a critical post-war national election is at hand. I got a real sense of time and place while reading these books. Apart from De Luca, Lucarelli does not invest a lot of time in presenting us with a full-blown character analysis of the key parties to the crime and its aftermath.

Via delle Oche (De Luca Trilogy, Book 3). Carlo Lucarelli. As I mentioned above, Carlo Lucarelli's "Carte Blanche" is the first volume in a trilogy. Following it are book 2, "The Damned Season," and book 3, "Via Delle Oche. but it really packs a punch!! Highly recommended. 5 people found this helpful. Carlo Lucarelli started his De Luca trilogy off with a whimper. CARTE BLANCHE was a meandering mess, with far too many characters thrown into too small of a plot

Via delle Oche (De Luca Trilogy, Book 3). CARTE BLANCHE was a meandering mess, with far too many characters thrown into too small of a plot. The books have been of interest primarily because of their setting, the fascist and post-fascist period of Italy in the 1940s.

Via delle Oche, a Bologna, è una strada rinomata.

VIA DELLE OCHE (Pol. Proc-Comm. VIA DELLE OCHE (Pol.

The final book in the De Luca trilogy. Murder in a brothel on a notorious street in the center of Bologna. Elections that will decide a nation's fate looming. A connection between the two? Perhaps. No wonder Commissario De Luca is off his food again. There has been a murder on Via delle Oche, the Bologna street at the center the city's notorious red light district

The final book in the De Luca trilogy. There has been a murder on Via delle Oche, the Bologna street at the center the city's notorious red light district. As always, De Luca is unwilling to look the other way when the evidence points to certain local politicians and members of the upper echelons of the Bologna police. Used availability for Carlo Lucarelli's Via Delle Oche. June 2008 : USA Paperback. A nation's fate is soon to be decided in bitterly contested elections; once again, the brutal worlds of crime and politics collude and collide, creating an atmosphere that becomes more volatile with each passing day. Genre: Mystery. Similar books by other authors.

Talk about Via delle Oche (De Luca Trilogy, Book 3)


Bolv
The final installment of the De Luca trilogy does not disappoint. If there is any profound difference in this tale and the earlier 2 works, it is that in this brutal dark world, there is no hope, not for De Luca, the police, the body politic or society. I would say that this is an example of perfect noir literature.

The characters are complex, the crime is simple, the motives are a labyrinthian serpentine mess and a not so simple cop does not stand a chance. He truly is a child expelled from the garden and his past like the effects of original sin will never be purged. Each character is doomed and they know it. I found the relationship between De Luca and the madame, Tippolina, to be particularly engrossing. Considering that much of the tale covers well-known ground it is surprising that there not the hint of a cliche. Each of the books gets better and better.

His style is very subtle and complex and the reader would do well to pay attention to the announcements and reports at the beginning of each chapter.
Naa
Police Commisario (Inspector) De Luca is one of those cops who would like nothing more than to be left along to do his job. He doesn't care much for politics on a global or national scale and doesn't really want to play the sort of political games that could facilitate a cop's climb up the career ladder. But De Luca lives in a turbulent place (Bologna, Italy) during turbulent times (WWII and its immediate aftermath) and the fact that De Luca wants no part of politics does not mean that politics and intrigue won't plague him as he goes about his business. The result has been a trilogy of books that have provided entertaining police stories while at the same time painting a pretty detailed picture of what life may have been like in post-war northern Italy.

"Via Delle Oche" is the final volume in what has come to be known as "The De Luca Trilogy". The trilogy is set in northern Italy and takes us from the closing days of WWII, (Carte Blanche (De Luca Trilogy 1)) to the turbulent years immediately after the war (The Damned Season (De Luca Trilogy 2)) until 1948, the current volume, where a critical post-war national election is at hand. The cold war is raging in Europe and the election is thought to be a critical battlefield. Consequently, the Church, the powerful Italian Communist Party, and various secular partisan political groups engage in the sort of intrigue that would make Machiavelli proud. This election is of no immediate professional consequence for De Luca since he is now, upon his return to Bologna from `exile' in Damned Season, assigned to the vice squad. De Luca doesn't seem to mind the demotion all that much as it keeps him outside the political battles that effect the police force as much as any other Italian institution. But the fates and a murder in a bordello on the Via Delle Oche conspire to put De Luca back where he least wants to be: in the limelight walking a political tightrope.

The strength of "Via Delle Oche" lies in Lucarelli's ability to paint a pretty realistic-feeling portrait of postwar northern Italy in the years immediately after WWII. I got a real sense of time and place while reading these books. Apart from De Luca, Lucarelli does not invest a lot of time in presenting us with a full-blown character analysis of the key parties to the crime and its aftermath. We also don't get a lot of the internal life of De Luca but De Luca's actions tend to speak for themselves and over the course of the books I got a nice feel for his personality without having had Lucarelli spell it out for me.

Although the stories themselves are self-contained I think that the De Luca Trilogy needs to be read in sequence. By the time I came to "Via Delle Oche" the character of Commisario De Luca has been fully formed and the reader will miss out on a lot of context if they have not read the first two volumes. I enjoyed all three books.

All in all Via Delle Oche was a filling end to the De Luca trilogy. Recommended. L. Fleisig
Thordira
I was surprised and disappointed in the brevity of each novel in this trilogy. Although Lucarelli revealed a side of modern Italian history that was unknown to me, the storytelling itself was uninspired and formulaic. If it was the author's intent to portray his anti-hero DeLuca in an unsympathetic, indeed cowardly ("I'm only a policeman" as he tried to worm his way out of trouble with the shifting authorities), way he succeeded. But the portrayal was also skin deep. It is hard to believe that three attractive women, one in each of the novelettes, were so immediately attracted to this unkempt man that they immediately slept with him. Perhaps the charm of these stories may have been in reading them in the original Italian. Although Lucarelli may be an authentic Italian, his stories contain none of the color and depth of the American Donna Leone in her writings about Venetian crime through the eyes of her Commissario notwithstanding any cultural miscues in her views of Italy.
Jek
Carlo Lucarelli taps into the deep well of Italian cynicism for this continuing saga of Commissario De Luca, the last honest cop in the country, as the parties of the Left and Right duke it out in an apparently meaningless contest for power. Against that political backdrop, Lucarelli spins a credible murder mystery that centers on the "honest prostitutes" working the city of Bologna.

Italy in 1948 was a tough neighborhood for anyone trying to get on with a normal life after many years of the Fascist regime and five years of the war. Lucarelli is terrific at giving the reader a realistic look at the environment of the time.

"Via Delle Oche" is the third book in this series now in translation and print by Europa Editions. "Carte Blanche" and "The Damned Season" chronicle earlier adventures of the indefatigable Commissario De Luca and are well worth reading.
lets go baby
A film was made of this series. The character in the book is quite different. The author portrays an important historical period. He tries to portray a man who is basically a cop/bureaucrat doing his job in all kinds of political systems. Interesting, good read, but fails to really reach the depth of such a moral quagmire.
Gorisar
This is a well written snapshot of the struggle in post war Italy between the communists, the church and secular moderates and right wing.
Very little character development goes on. I would recommend this to Italophiles. As a mystery it is ok not great.
greatest
This novel was very good up until the end, then it sort of fell apart. That said, this book gives a very good history lesson into the aftermath of World War two when the communist were vying for power in the region.