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Download Scales of Justice ePub

by Ngaio Marsh

Download Scales of Justice ePub
  • ISBN 0006121411
  • ISBN13 978-0006121411
  • Language English
  • Author Ngaio Marsh
  • Publisher HarperCollins Distribution Services; n.i. edition (November 1969)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats mobi docx mbr txt
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Mystery
  • Size ePub 1367 kb
  • Size Fb2 1233 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 254


Scales of Justice is a detective novel by Ngaio Marsh. it is the eighteenth novel to feature Roderick Alleyn, and was first published in 1955.

Scales of Justice is a detective novel by Ngaio Marsh. The plot concerns the murder of Colonel Carterette, an enthusiastic fisherman in charge of publishing the controversial memoirs of the local baronet. Scales of Justice on IMDb.

Other author's books: Money in the Morgue. Collected Short Fiction of Ngaio Marsh. Death in a White Tie. Clutch of Constables.

Ngaio Marsh Scales Of Justice For Stella CHAPTER I Swevenings Nurse Kettle pushed her bicycle to the top of Watt’s Hill and there paused. Читать онлайн Scales of Justice. Sweating lightly, she looked down on the village of Swevenings. Smoke rose in cosy plumes from one or two chimneys; roofs cuddled into surrounding greenery. The Chyne, a trout stream, meandered through meadow and coppice and slid blamelessly under two bridges. It was a circumspect landscape. CHAPTER I. Swevenings. Nurse Kettle pushed her bicycle to the top of Watt’s Hill and there paused.

Dame Ngaio Marsh was born in New Zealand in 1895 and died in February 1982. She wrote over 30 detective novels and many of her stories have theatrical settings, for Ngaio Marsh’s real passion was the theatre. She was both actress and producer and almost single-handedly revived the New Zealand public’s interest in the theatre. It was for this work that the received what she called her ‘damery’ in 1966.

Ngaio Marsh is the author of numerous crime novels. It's a shame that Marsh is not recognised as among the very best writers in this genre and 'Scale. ' id among hrt finest. Along with Agatha Christie, Margery Allingham, and Dorothy L. Sayers, she was classed as one of the four original "Queens of Crime" of the 1920s and 1930s. Benedict Cumberbatch is an actor whose movies include Atonement and The Other Boleyn Girl.

Scales of Justice (1955) is one of Ngaio Marsh's most classically British mysteries. In fact, despite its 1955 printing date, it has a very pre-WWII feel to it. It is set in the standard small charming village with all the familiar figures-former British military types (Colonel Carterette, the murderee, and Commander Syce, an inebriate ex-navy man); the local landed gentry represented by Lady Lacklander and her son (recently elevated to Sir George Lacklander after the death of his father); the Scales of Justice. 1955) is one of Ngaio Marsh's most classically British mysteries

Of all the books in the Alleyn series, Scales of Justice is most powerfully reminiscent of Agatha Christie, with its setting in an almost unspeakably charming little English village, and its cast of inbred aristocrats

Of all the books in the Alleyn series, Scales of Justice is most powerfully reminiscent of Agatha Christie, with its setting in an almost unspeakably charming little English village, and its cast of inbred aristocrats. When one of the aristos turns up dead next to the local trout-stream with a trout at his side everyone is dreadfully upset, but really, just a tad irritated as well: Murder is so awfully messy. Thank gawd that nice Inspector Alleyn is on hand to clear things u. show more.

Of all the books in the Alleyn series, Scales of Justice is most powerfully reminiscent of Agatha Christie, with its setting in an almost unspeakably charming little English village, and its cast of inbred aristocrats. When one of the aristos turns up dead next to the local trout-stream with, in fact, a trout at his side everyone is dreadfully upset, of course, but really, just a tad irritated as well: Murder is so awfully messy

She did not need Skip’s lament to tell her that the curled figure resting its head on a turf of river grass was dead. She knelt beside it and pushed her hand under the tweed jacket and silk shirt ooling, she thought.

She did not need Skip’s lament to tell her that the curled figure resting its head on a turf of river grass was dead. A tweed hat with fisherman’s flies in the band lay over the face. Someone, she thought, might almost have dropped it there. She lifted it and remained quite still with it suspended in her hand. The Colonel’s temple had been broken as if his head had come under a waxworker’s hammer. The spaniel threw back his head and howled again.

Talk about Scales of Justice


CrazyDemon
This is a fiendish clever mystery, written with wit and venom. How is it that modern writers of so called cozy mysteries emulate the form without always matching the intelligence?

The book begins with a birdseye view of a charming landscape, filled primarily with British aristocrats and the community that revolves around them. At first glance all is peaceful and pretty, but with the death of an elderly Lord damning secrets begin to seep to the surface. When a murder is discovered Chief Inspector Allen is called in. Is the murder a result of of submerged political scandal or a quarrel over local fishing rights? Are there other factors at work? The murdered man is pleasant fellow of stellar character. Who could have ended his life in what turns out to be a particularly awful manner?

As with another recently read Ngiao Marsh mystery written in roughly the same stage of her career, I am struck by the singular mix of charm and intensity that seems to have arisen as Marsh developed as a writer. Her earlier books were always entertaining and well observed but around this juncture of her career she seems to have become ferocious. There are at least two mysteries from around this period that share this quality and this may be one of her best. I hope that the later Marsh books continue to be released in ebook form do that I can enjoy them. This one was a bit of a revelation.
Arcanefist
For some reason, I'm having trouble reviewing this book. It was most enjoyable and certainly held my attention. The storyline centers around a family trying to hide the memoirs of a deceased relation. The memoirs are in the hands of one of the neighbors and he is planning on releasing them. Thus, your murder. It really is a tightly woven story even though it is a typical English village mystery. Wealthy folks and not so wealthy folks and their pasts are all intertwined and involved in the memoirs. The wealthy Lady Lacklander is rather amusing at times. Solid Inspector Roderick Alleyn story.
Ynonno
As usual, I enjoyed this Marsh novel. It has all of what I love: the Brits in the 1930's-40's era, their way of life, and, of course, a murder being solved.
This is beside the point, but I had a chance to visit Ms March's home which is now a museum dedicated to her. It was thrilling!
Vetitc
I first read this book about two decades ago, and have never, ever forgotten the grisly method of murder used in it. It's not presented horrifically, so there's no real need to worry about nightmares, but it is absolutely unique among mysteries.
MOQ
Ngaio Marsh is great. This is one of her best.
Tiainar
Ngaio Marsh's Scales of Justice is an excellent genre mystery by a master. The murder is a puzzle and the solution ingenious. Roderick Alleyn is one of my favorite Inspectors. He has all those qualities we imagine are in the British nobility.
Elizabeth
This is not my favorite Ngaio Marsh effort; nonetheless, even after several readings, it still pleases, and even manages to remain in my future as a dandy read.
Roderick Alleyn can do no wrong, IMHO, and this particular tale has a charming side plot/romance that especially
appeals to me. Nothing breathtaking in this story, but one falls into this situation as into a warm bath.