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by Ben Aaronovitch

Download Whispers Under Ground ePub
  • ISBN 0575097655
  • ISBN13 978-0575097650
  • Language English
  • Author Ben Aaronovitch
  • Publisher Gollancz (March 1, 2012)
  • Pages 384
  • Formats doc mbr txt azw
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Mystery
  • Size ePub 1385 kb
  • Size Fb2 1145 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 934

Doctor Who Screenwriter Ben Aaronovitch's superbly entertaining supernatural crime series has, with its witty one-liners and wonderfully erudite take on London, won a legion of fans in double quick time. Peter Grant is learning magic fast. And its just as well - he's already had run ins with the deadly supernatural children of the Thames and a terrifying killer in Soho. Progression in the Police Force is less easy. Especially when you work in a department of two. A department that doesn't even officially exist. A department that if you did describe it to most people would get you laughed at. And then there's his love life. The last person he fell for ended up seriously dead. It wasn't his fault, but still. Now something horrible is happening in the labyrinth of tunnels that make up the tube system that honeycombs the ancient foundations of London. And delays on the Northern line is the very least of it. Time to call in the Met's Economic and Specialist Crime Unit 9, aka 'The Folly'. Time to call in PC Peter Grant, Britains Last Wizard.

Also by Ben Aaronovitch.

Also by Ben Aaronovitch. It’s under it – where the train tracks are. And it’s a h. The school she was talking about was the local comprehensive, Acland Burghley, where countless generations of the Peckwater Estate had been educated, including me and Abigail.

Книга жанра: Неизвестно, Жанр неопределен. Читать онлайн в библиотеке Booksonline. In memory of Blake Snyder (1957–2009) who not only saved the cat but the writer, the mortgage and the career as well.

Home Ben Aaronovitch Whispers Under Ground. Whispers under ground, . 1.

Whispers Under Ground is the third novel in the Rivers of London series by English author Ben Aaronovitch, published 2012 by Gollancz

Whispers Under Ground is the third novel in the Rivers of London series by English author Ben Aaronovitch, published 2012 by Gollancz. Peter Grant of Metropolitan Police department in charge of magical crimes (AKA The Folly) is called in to assist in a murder investigation. The victim, an American student found stabbed to death at Baker Street station was killed with a potsherd, raising the suspicion the death may be Falcon (police code for 'Folly') related.

Whispers Under Ground is something to get excited about. A gripping new outing for PC Grant in the Top 10 SUNDAY TIMES-bestselling series from Ben Aaronovitch. See all Product description

Whispers Under Ground is something to get excited about. A thrilling read that will have you checking corners of London when you're out, to see what may be lurking about. Danielle Goldstein Time Out). See all Product description.

Whispers Under Ground. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Author: Ben Aaronovitch. Publisher: Gollancz, London, 2012. A whole new reason to mind the gap. It begins with a dead body at the far end of Baker Street tube station, all that remains of American exchange student James Gallagher-and the victim’s wealthy, politically powerful family is understandably eager to get to the bottom of the gruesome murder. The trouble is, the bottom-if it exists at all-is deeper and more unnatural than anyone suspects. Купить за 889 руб на Озоне. Ben Aaronovitch at the Internet Book List. Ben Aaronovitch at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. 1964 (age 46–47) London, England. Ben Denis Aaronovitch (born 1964) is a London-born British writer who has worked on television series including Doctor Who, Casualty, Jupiter Moon and Dark Knight  .

Doctor Who Screenwriter Ben Aaronovitch's superbly entertaining supernatural crime series has, with its witty one-liners and wonderfully erudite take on London, won a legion of fans in double quick time. Peter Grant is learning magic fast. And its just as well - he's already had run ins with the deadly supernatural children of the Thames and a terrifying killer in Soho. Progression in the Police Force is less easy. Especially when you work in a department of two. A department that doesn't even officially exist

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Talk about Whispers Under Ground


Oparae
I'll start with the easy stuff. Ben Aaronovitch's "Whispers Under Ground" (the third in his "PC Peter Grant" series) is easily the best of the first three books. If you've read and liked the first two, then read this one. You'll enjoy it. As usual, it's a light-hearted, yet dark, fast-paced paranormal murder mystery with excellent characterizations, wonderful vocabulary, and well-done world descriptions (though perhaps a bit too London/police oriented). No complaints there. But, for some reason, Aaronovitch decided to purposefully mess with the main character's grammar in this book. In all the previous books, the protagonist's (and everyone else's, for that matter) grammar and vocabulary have been faultless. In this one, he has our hero use "me and [someone's name]" (usually "me and Lesley") instead of "[someone's name] and I" (usually "Lesley and I") as the subject in almost every "compound subject" case. I'm not talking about complex sentences where it might be a tad difficult to figure out who the subject and object might be. Just simple, straight-forward sentences. It drove me crazy. There are two instances (one right at the start and one about two-thirds of the way through) where Nightingale corrects his grammar. So, it appears that Aaronovitch is doing this to make PC Peter Grant more of an "average copper." But, he's not. Plus, sticking one recurring incorrect grammatical rule into a highly educated, highly erudite, highly articulate person's dialog does not a rustic make. I'm not holding this against the book, but I sure hope it doesn't continue into future books.

Anyway, I'm rating this book at a Very Good 4 stars out of 5.

The novels in Ben Aaronovitch's "PC Peter Grant" (or "Rivers of London") series are:

1. Midnight Riot (PC Peter Grant Book 1)
2. Moon Over Soho (PC Peter Grant Book 2)
3. Whispers Under Ground (PC Peter Grant Book 3)
4. Broken Homes (PC Peter Grant Book 4)
5. Foxglove Summer (PC Peter Grant Book 5)
6. The Hanging Tree (Rivers of London)
Hanad
The third installment finds us about a year into the apprenticeship and Peter has a sense of equanimity about all the odd things he encounters and doesn't understand. A young son of an American senator is dead in the Underground and it just seems off. Peter is called in to keep things calm for he sake of the FBI agent that comes over, not surprisingly that is a big fail on keeping things quiet from her. New facets of this world keep coming and the premise that Nightengale had missed them due to lack of Londonness and quiet after the war makes sense. Can't wait to see what new creatures and mayhem from the Faceless One develop in the series
Welahza
After being a little disappointed, although still entertained, by the second book in the series the third restored my faith. One murder leads to yet more magical creatures, or people who are not entirely human. Detective Lesley May is back in action. I love her partnership with Peter and was glad to get to see more of it in this book. Aaronovitch’s humor continues to make me snort with laughter. I like the way the mythology continues to build, and the way that Peter experiments, trying to understand what magic is. The amount of history that is squeezed into the books always surprises and delights me. I love this series!
Araath
These books are just so beautifully British. I can't get enough. I don't read them for the plots, which are perfectly adequate, I read them for the language, the wry self-recognition, the tropes served up steaming and inverted on a platter. It has taken me a while to write this because I had to narrow down the dozens of highlights of lines that made me laugh to just a few.

Peter makes me want to cheer and hug him and give him a pass to a convention, because he rings all of my One Of Us geek bells. He makes references to Discworld and RPGs and a really hilarious Tolkien joke that made me giggle madly. And yet, although he is obviously One Of Us(me) geek-wise, he is living in a different world. His late-night drunks eat at kebab shops instead of pancake houses, his world has more cameras everywhere, his car is called something weird. That is all awesome and textured. And people see him differently than they do me, because he is police, and because he is mixed. And that mixture of deeply familiar (It does no good to tell people you played Call of Cthulu instead of D&D, you still get mocked) and the different (the perils of hair care when chemical relaxants are a part of the repertoire) gives me all sorts of happy meeting-people feelings. I feel like my world is bigger because I know a magic-using London bobby.

In this one, Peter end up in the sewers a lot. It's like It, only way less creepy and way more odiferous. Also, it leads to one of my favorite lines.
"My foot hit something underwater hard enough to pitch me over, and the world's first ever Anglo-American Olympic sewer luge team broke up."
See, don't you want to read the kind of book where that line can happen? Also:
"Let's just say it's the sort of smell that follows you home, hangs around outside your door, and tries to hack into your voice mail."
Also:
"Nightingale turned up," she said. "He was hoping to shout at you a bit to show his affection in a gruff manly and safely nongay way but you were asleep so he just sort of milled around for a while and then off he went."

And for bonus: "The London Underground was no exception, built by a breed of entrepreneurs whose grasp was matched only by the size of their sideburns."

"Guleed pulled a big furry hat with earflaps down over her hijab and looked at me and Carey, bareheaded and frozen-eared, with amusement. "Practical AND modest," she said."

Read if: You have ever enjoyed a police procedural novel. You want a bit of weird in your crime. You adore a well-executed first-person novel.

Skip if: You are unwilling to learn modern British slang. You are looking for a deep exposition in magic systems.

Also read: I think this is the spiritual descendent of Jim Butcher's Storm Front (The Dresden Files, Book 1) books, but so much less annoying in terms of gender, race, and pretty much everything else. But I still enjoy the hell out of the voice in the Butcher books, so there you have it.