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Download Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries) ePub

by Robert Goldsborough

Download Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries) ePub
  • ISBN 1453270973
  • ISBN13 978-1453270974
  • Language English
  • Author Robert Goldsborough
  • Publisher MysteriousPress.com/Open Road; 1st edition (November 13, 2012)
  • Pages 234
  • Formats docx azw rtf txt
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Mystery
  • Size ePub 1446 kb
  • Size Fb2 1808 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 922

Winner of the Lovey Award for Best Historical Novel: This award-winning mystery reveals how Archie Goodwin joined forces with famed private detective Nero Wolfe and launched a literary legend. In 1930, young Archie Goodwin comes to New York City hoping for a bit of excitement. In his third week working as a night watchman, he stops two burglars in their tracks—with a pair of hot lead slugs.   Dismissed from his job for being “trigger-happy,” he parlays his newfound notoriety into a job as a detective’s assistant, helping honest sleuth Del Bascom solve cases like the Morningside Piano Heist, the Rive Gauche Art Gallery Swindle, and the Sumner-Hayes Burglary. But it’s the kidnapping of Tommie Williamson, the son of a New York hotel magnate, that introduces Goodwin to the man who will change his life.   Goodwin knows there’s only one detective who can help find Tommie: Nero Wolfe, the stout genius of West Thirty-Fifth Street. Together, they’ll form one of the most unlikely crime fighting duos in history—but first Goodwin must locate Tommie and prove that he deserves a place by Wolfe’s side.   In this witty story about the origin of a legendary partnership, Robert Goldsborough gloriously evokes the spirit of Nero Wolfe’s creator, bestselling author Rex Stout, and breathes new life into his beloved characters.   

Archie Meets Nero Wolfe book. All mystery aficionados know Rex Stout and his marvelous Nero Wolfe novels

Archie Meets Nero Wolfe book. All mystery aficionados know Rex Stout and his marvelous Nero Wolfe novels. They are intelligent, witty and well-written whodunits with one of the most lasting heroes of the genre: the eccentric gourmet, orchid-growing private detective and his tough sidekick, Archie Goodwin. Since the 1980s, beginning with Murder in E Minor, Robert Goldsborough has brought the series back to life and has intimately captured Stout’s style.

To become part of the Nero Wolfe legend, Archie Goodwin must prove his worth . Loved Rex Stout's Nero & Archie but Robert Goldsborough's book was great. I had to keep reading. how more.

To become part of the Nero Wolfe legend, Archie Goodwin must prove his worth Archie Goodwin comes to New York City hopin. Books related to Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe Mysteries.

The Bloodied Ivy (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries Book 3). A Call from Rockford (A Snap Malek Mystery)

To Barbara Stout and Rebecca Stout Bradbury, whose support and encouragement have been. The next afternoon when I reported for work, I was met at the door of the Moreland Import office by my boss, Luke Bates. Sorry, Goodwin, but we’re going to have to let you go, he said with a shrug. The Bloodied Ivy (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries Book 3). A Call from Rockford (A Snap Malek Mystery). Archie in the Crosshairs. Fade to Black (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries Book 5). Three Strikes You're Dead (A Snap Malek Mystery). Archie Meets Nero Wolfe.

Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries. by Robert Goldsborough. Young Tommie has gone missing, and only one detective is built for the job: Nero Wolfe, the heavyset genius of West Thirty-Fifth Street. Together they will form one of the most unlikely crime fighting duos in history - but first Goodwin must find Tommie Williamson, and prove to Wolfe that he deserves a place by his side. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Archie and Nero Wolfe fans rejoice! Robert Goldsborough, who so deftly and . Below are my impressions of this book "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe", and note that I do not give any spoilers.

Archie and Nero Wolfe fans rejoice! Robert Goldsborough, who so deftly and ably continued the Wolfe series a few years back, has returned to tell the story every fan wanted to hear: the origin of the Wolfe/Goodwin partnership. This book has a hardboiled sheen worthy of the period it recreates and captures Stout’s recurring characters-not just Archie and Wolfe-with a fidelity that is damn near supernatural.

Archie meets nero wolfe. To Barbara Stout and Rebecca Stout Bradbury, whose support and encouragement have been. appreciated more than I can ever say. At this rate, I would freeze before Halloween. I wouldn’t have taken the job if anything better had turned up, but I felt lucky just to have work of any kind. I saw enough of those long lines on the sidewalks outside the soup kitchens to appreciate getting a paycheck, even a small one. Besides, I was not about to go back to Chillicothe, Ohio, with my tail between my legs.

Электронная книга "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries", Robert Goldsborough. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was . Nero Wolfe sprang full-grown from Stout’s forehead in that first book, and though in later years he would write non-Wolfe novels and even try hi. .

Rex Stout REX STOUT, the creator of Nero Wolfe, was born in Noblesville, Indiana, in 1886, the sixth of nine children of John and Lucetta Todhunter Stout, both Quakers. Shortly after his birth. Ten years later a seventy-third Nero Wolfe mystery was discovered and published in Death Times Three. The Rex Stout Library. Nero Wolfe sprang full-grown from Stout’s forehead in that first book, and though in later years he would write non-Wolfe novels and even try his hand at another series character-from Wolfe to Fox should have been easy, after all-his doom was sealed (a melodramatic phrase Mr. Stout would never have employed) right from Fer-de-Lance.

Talk about Archie Meets Nero Wolfe: A Prequel to Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe Mysteries (The Nero Wolfe Mysteries)


Amhirishes
I've enjoyed Rex Stout's Nero Wolf/Archie Goodwin stories for over 30 years, and I own every book and story Stout wrote on this intrepid duo. (Well, Archie is intrepid. :-) ) And I've read all but one of them. The reason that I haven't read that last book is because when I finish it, there will be no more, and a part of me just doesn't want the series to end.

So, I later bought and enjoyed Robert Goldsborough's seven pastiches, and although some parts didn't feel quite right (like Wolfe's almost fawning on several women characters in the earlier books), on the whole, they could have passed for something Stout had authored. But I thought that with "The Missing Chapter", which was about the murder of an author who continued a dead author's mystery series (and seemed to be a very big wink to the reading audience), that Goldsborough had hung them up, so to speak. So, I was pleasantly surprised to find, 19 years after that book, that Goldsborough had decided to write another Nero Wolfe novel. Below are my impressions of this book "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe", and note that I do not give any spoilers.

The book is well written and fits stylistically as a prelude to Stout's first Wolfe novel, "Fer-de-Lance". By that I mean the idiom and grammar fit to story's time frame (the late 1920's). While avid fans will undoubtedly notice discrepancies from the Wolfe "canon", I believe many of these were rational compromises made by the author to make the story work, and don't really affect the novel. With one minor exception, I enjoyed reading the book and it felt like I was reading something written by Rex Stout. My complaint, and it was an annoyance, not a critical flaw, is that Orrie Cather was portrayed as a big jerk, so much so that you have to wonder why Wolfe would bother using him. Orrie of course has his flaws, but at this stage of the game I think he should have been much more toned down in actions and demeanor.

But overall, I thought this was a very good book and will add it to my Nero Wolfe collection. It's motivated me to re-read all of the novels/stories again, and maybe this time I'll read that last novel, too, as nobody lives forever. In sum, I'm happy to have another Nero Wolf/Archie Goodwin book, and if Mr Goldsborough decides to write another Wolfe novel, I'm going to buy it. Four stars.
Dianantrius
I've read and re-read my complete collection of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe stories for years. I've also read most of Robert Goldsborough's Nero Wolfe books. While not perfect, they were thoroughly enjoyable. "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe" failed to satisfy in every measurable way.
The title alone should have told me it was going to be a disappointment. Can you think of another Nero Wolfe title that was so flat and straightforward? This is how "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe" reads -- extremely flat, obvious and unimaginative.

Instead of Archie's wit and sardonic insight we get pages and pages of forced expositional dialogue. Instead of 'watching' Archie show his meddle and demonstrate what he's capable of, we have to hear character after character tell Archie how wonderful and insightful he is... for some reason. Even Cramer piles it on thick (albiet with negative reinforcement) every time he talks to Archie -- even though he's only just met him.

The writing is grades below what we've come to expect from Stout or even Goldsborough. Other's have commented on the flaws better than I could, but I couldn't believe the amount of times the writer used the phrase "so-called" and its variations in telling the story. Various characters used the phrase pages across from each other in completely different conversations. As I said earlier, the writing was unimaginative and lacking the rich vocabulary of a typical Nero Wolfe novel.

Finally, I'll explain my feelings for "Archie Meets Nero Wolfe" in a way that Nero Wolfe fans will understand; I dog-earred pages between reading sessions and I feel obligated to rip pages from the book and feed them to my fireplace.
Fearlessdweller
For the most part, I enjoyed this book, and found the characters more or less consistent with canon. It's nice to have a plausible scenario for how Archie came to join Nero Wolfe's household, though "plausible" is the most I could say in that regard.

The solution to the mystery is not as convincing as those Rex Stout typically wrote. I also found two instances of sloppiness somewhat irritating.

First: Archie and others confront a lawyer who usually works for two-bit lowlifes, and thoroughly cow him by suggesting that clients of his have committed in serious felonies and claiming that the lawyer would consequently be in trouble with the police and (if I recall correctly) the legal community as a result. This is ridiculous. Lawyers are perfectly entitled to defend, and to keep most secrets of, felons of the nastiest stripe. There was no question of another impending crime, which is the only area where tricky questions of professional ethics arise.

Second: the author repeatedly treats "silencers" as if they in fact silence gunshots. Sorry, no. They merely reduce the noise to a less ear-shattering level. "Suppressor" is a less misleading term. While it makes sense for Goldsborough to use the familiar and colloquial "silencer," he should not let himself be misled by it.