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Download London Blues ePub

by Anthony Frewin

Download London Blues ePub
  • ISBN 1874061734
  • ISBN13 978-1874061731
  • Language English
  • Author Anthony Frewin
  • Publisher No Exit Press (March 27, 1997)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats docx rtf doc rtf
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Thrillers and Suspense
  • Size ePub 1823 kb
  • Size Fb2 1359 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 113

Trade edition paperback vg+ condition. In stock shipped from our UK warehouse

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The discovery of a 30-year-old blue movie leads back to director Tim Purdom and the London of the late '50s and early '60s.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Purdom was a pioneer of the British porn industry and on the periphery of the government sex scandal. He directed eight films.

The whole sordid episode is presented in Frewin's book, but only through the eyes of the protagonist, and much of the context may be confusing without further grounding

The whole sordid episode is presented in Frewin's book, but only through the eyes of the protagonist, and much of the context may be confusing without further grounding. Some readers may find confusing or be put off by its framing technique.

Benny Harris (1965) SATURDAY. I was up early and like I do every morning now I peek out from behind the curtains to see if the Humber is still there. remained was the mute testimony of a large patch of leaked oil. This news put me in a good frame of mind for the rest of the day and as custom was pretty slow at Modern Snax after lunch I closed the place at 3 . Fuck it, I thought, I’ll go down one of the clubs and have a drink and thus I found myself climbing the narrow steps of the Colony.

For more than two decades, Anthony Frewin was assistant film director to Stanley Kubrick.

London Blues is a provocative, totally original crime novel. For more than two decades, Anthony Frewin was assistant film director to Stanley Kubrick.

London Blues explicitly and unremittingly details the hidden world of Soho vice and London’s demi-monde at the time when the grey . Touch Blue Your wish will come true. Mother Goose’s Melody (circa 1765).

London Blues explicitly and unremittingly details the hidden world of Soho vice and London’s demi-monde at the time when the grey 1950s were giving way to the ‘swingin’ sixties’. It is a dramatic and compelling venture into the secret history of our time - a provocative and totally original novel. The quintessential Soho book’ – Loaded. A forceful, striking thriller’ – Time Out. ‘The most intriguing British writer since Derek Raymond’ – Bizarre.

And where is Tim now?London Blues explicitly and unremittingly details the hidden world of Soho vice and London's demi-monde at the time when the grey 1950s were giving way to the 'swingin' sixties'

And where is Tim now?London Blues explicitly and unremittingly details the hidden world of Soho vice and London's demi-monde at the time when the grey 1950s were giving way to the 'swingin' sixties'.

Anthony Frewin was born in London and lives in Hertfordshire. He was assistant film director to Stanley Kubrick for over 20 years. He has written three novels, London Blues, Sixty-Three Closure and Scorpian Rising.

London Blues explicitly and unremittingly details the hidden world of Soho vice and London's demi-monde at the time when the grey 1950s were giving way to the 'swingin' sixties'. London Blues - Anthony Frewin. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: No Exit PressReleased: Sep 20, 2011ISBN: 9781842436165Format: book. carousel previous carousel next.

Talk about London Blues


PC-rider
This book purports to give the background of the Profumo sex scandal that brought down the Macmillan government in 1962. The narrator is presented as a semi-principled cameraman who reluctantly consents to film hard-core porn films for an upperclass homosexual for a few pounds solely at the urging of his semi-slutty girlfriend Veronica. The narrator's feints at morality are lukewarm; he is a voyeur, au fond, at one with the sleaze he records.

The plot describes how sexual blackmail is used to topple political adversaries. In an odd twist of plot the author manages to attribute the sexual blackmail to the Macmillan government, thereby exonerating Harold Wilson's commie faction in an awkward violation of "cui bono?"

The John Profumo scandal interested President John Kennedy. JFK realized that Macmillan's Tory Party was under attack by the contrived scandal. Macmillan's Sec of State for War, John Profumo, was linked to call girls, one of whom was "coincidentally" lovers with a Russian spy. The question no one asked was why MI5 failed to warn Macmillan of this, given the fact that all Russian spies were under intense surveillance . . as were all government officials. JFK knew that he himself could be subjected to similar tactics. He took care to distance himself from Frank Sinatra (his Hollywood procurer) . . . infuriating Frank.

Nowadays the fingers of the Hidden Hand of the Central Bankensteins are clear for those with eyes to see; they are:
1) Mossad-MI6, 2) Mossad-CIA, 3) Mossad-KGB, 4) Mossad-Deuxieme Bureau, 5) Mossad-Bundesnachrichtendienst, and last but not least, the sixth finger -- Mossad.

Ah! The Surveillance State is Together at Last. Can WW III and the NWO be far behind?
Cui bono?
caif
This books takes place in real time (during the infamous Profumo Scandal in Great Britain), using a created character to guide the reader through the events. It's very shrewdly constructed and very believable. Frewin gets under the skin of the characters and makes the claustrophobic paranoid character of the novel grow and grow and grow. What seems at first like an interesting historical re-creation becomes more of an insider's view of the events -- and a chilling commentary on the power of the gov't to make people and events just disappear. Frewin is an excellent writer who puts you right into the minds of the characters and creates the whole universe they inhabit. A friend recommended the book and i'm glad he did. I've gone on to read other Frewin novels and they're just as good, for different reasons.
Binthars
Five years ago, I saw this book in a London bookshop and filed it away in my head as something to check out when I had more money. Last week, after carrying the title around in a notebook for years, I stumbled across a used copy in a local bookshop. I'll step right up and say that, yes, it was worth the effort and the wait. Frewin's debut (he was Stanley Kubrick's PA for many years), is a great, gritty period thriller set amidst early '60s London. The atmosphere oozes off the page in a story which follows a small-time part time pornographer who gets mixed up in the Profumo scandal.
A note of caution here-those not familiar with the Profumo scandal (which is likely to be almost any American reader) would be well advised to do a little reading about it prior to embarking on Frewin's book. The Guardian web site has a decent mini-history of the affair, or at the least, watch the 1989 film Scandal (starring John Hurt and a young Bridget Fonda). The whole sordid episode is presented in Frewin's book, but only through the eyes of the protagonist, and much of the context may be confusing without further grounding.
A further note of caution is order due to the book's structure. Some readers may find confusing or be put off by its framing technique. The book starts with a 40 page section in which a contemporary narrator discovers an old '60s short porn film appended (appropriately enough) to a video of Get Carter. His curiosity over the maker of the "blue" film leads an interview-like series of other people talking about "Tim." Then the bulk of the book slips back in time to follow country lad Tim, as he tries to make it in the big city and the unsavory people he gets mixed up in. The book then ends with a brief further contemporary section. Those who demand their thrillers end neatly, with all loose ends tied up will be especially frustrated by the outcome.
Frewin's prose is direct and lively, capturing the period slang and tone. To a large degree, the story is one about a "secret London" of greasy cafés, small time hoods, West Indian immigrants, wanna-be models, and cover-ups. It's a vibrantly seedy portrait of London's transition from the postwar '50s to the legendary "swinging" '60s. (If the time and place interests you, check out Colin MacInnes' London trilogy of City of Spades, Absolute Beginners, and Mr. Love and Justice) The thriller aspect is a rather perplexing, tied up as it is in Tim's pornographic work and the Profumo scandal, but moves the story along-always with a hint of conspiracy. Good stuff, and I'll definitely be adding Frewin's next two books, "Sixty-Three Closure" and "Scorpion Rising" to my list, although hopefully it won't take me five years to find and read them!