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by Robert Reuland

Download Semiautomatic ePub
  • ISBN 0099287129
  • ISBN13 978-0099287124
  • Language English
  • Author Robert Reuland
  • Publisher Vintage (November 3, 2005)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats lrf rtf txt rtf
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Thrillers and Suspense
  • Size ePub 1118 kb
  • Size Fb2 1698 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 293

On Brooklyn's treacherous streets, having a conscience can be a dangerous commodity... When Andrew Giobberti, exiled from Homicide to Appeals, suddenly finds himself in demand in the prosecution of the horrific murder of a beloved neighborhood grocer, he cannot know the hornet's nest of lies and double-dealing he will uncover. With the newspapers and the powers-that-be insisting Gio convict the supposed perp at any cost, his capacity for fair play and diligence leads him to a shocking conspiracy that reaches all the way to the top - and in a world founded on corruption and cover-ups, this fine-tuned sense of justice could just cost him his life....

Gio vows to play this one by the book, yet the difficulty of doing that quickly becomes apparent

Random House Publishing Group, 27‏/09‏/2005 - 242 من الصفحات. Robert Reuland’s hard-edged yet elegant writing has drawn comparisonsto that of writers as far-flung as Chandler, Hemingway, and T. S. Eliot, but his voice is all his own. With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn. Gio vows to play this one by the book, yet the difficulty of doing that quickly becomes apparent. He is paired with prosecutor Laurel Ashfield, and the two establish an instant mutual dislike. A key witness disappears.

Robert Charles Reuland (born 1963) is an American novelist and attorney. Reuland commenced his legal career in 1990 in Manhattan. Since 2001 Reuland has had a parallel career as a novelist. He is the author of two published novels, Hollowpoint (Random House 2001) and Semiautomatic (Random House 2004). Both books are set in the Brooklyn . s office, where Reuland worked an assistant district attorney between 1996 and 2001.

Robert Reuland's hard-edged yet elegant writing has drawn comparisonsto that of writers as far-flung as Chandler, Hemingway, and T. WithSemiautomatic,Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn.

Semiautomatic : a novel. Semiautomatic : a novel. by. Reuland, Rob, 1963-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on August 19, 2010.

July 2007 : UK Paperback.

Having resolved an explosive case in a controversial manner, Andrew Giobberti has been exiled from the high-powered DA's Homicide Bureau to the dusty decay of the Appeals Bureau. But the powers that be want this brilliant, difficult prosecutor back in the courtroom. They're counting on Giobberti's courtroom brilliance to ensure a guilty verdict for murder suspect Haskin Pool.

Semiautomatic follows Reuland’s acclaimed debut, Hollowpoint, which introduced antihero Andrew Giobberti, a prosecutor reckoning with his daughter’s accidental death while investigating a murder case that hits far too close to home

Semiautomatic follows Reuland’s acclaimed debut, Hollowpoint, which introduced antihero Andrew Giobberti, a prosecutor reckoning with his daughter’s accidental death while investigating a murder case that hits far too close to home. Now, eighteen months later, we find Gio gun-shy, living a rote existence, working in the sleepily academic Appeals Bureau.

Semiautomatic: A Novel Robert Reuland's hard-edged yet elegant writing .

Semiautomatic: A Novel Robert Reuland's hard-edged yet elegant writing has drawn comparisonsto that of writers as far-flung as Chandler, Hemingway, and T. E. Semiautomatic follows Reuland's acclaimed debut, Hollowpoint, which introduced antihero Andrew Giobberti, a prosecutor reckoning with his daughter's accidental death while investigating a murder case that hits far too close to home.

Last updated November 15, 2019. Robert Charles Reuland. 1963-11-01) November 1, 1963 (age 56) Dallas, Texas. In the United States, a district attorney (DA) is the chief prosecutor for a local government area, typically a county. The exact name of the office varies by state.

Talk about Semiautomatic


watching to future
I liked Hollowpoint, but I really like the follow-on, Semiautomatic. If you read one, you must start with the debut novel, as there is a tremendous amount of back story that Reuland does not repeat in sufficient detail in this book.

After Hollowpoint, we saw a down on his luck assistant DA do his best to insert the right outcome into a case he was handling for the prosecutor's office. The author's prior work as a DA there lent a lot of charm to the first book and all of that continues here. As with the first book, the protagonist is handled a 'simple' case that turns out to be anything but. He's pared with a partner who has no experience in prosecuting murder cases, and they develop a very tentative and complex relationship while they try to move forward with the case. As you might expect, there are bigger forces and a larger agenda here at work. Watching them figure this out and what they're prepared to do about it is a real treat.

I wrote in my review of Hollowpoint that the sense of place for Brooklyn was strong. It's even stronger here. You can practically smell the steam of the summer shower coming off of the still hot pavements.

Reuland is an author to keep an eye on. I for one will be following him.

Recommended highly.
Zolorn
It would be a mistake to call this a legal thriller, just as it would be a mistake to believe that what happens in most American courtrooms is legally thrilling. This is taut, believable urban crime drama from someone batting .1000 right out of the box on his first two novels. It's not plot-crazed Grisham. It's a story and characters to think about and a protagonist you can actually buy. I loved it, just as I loved Hollowpoint, his first. The second is more enjoyable if you read HP and got the setup but Semiautomatic also stands on its own as a first-rate urban crime novel. Very good stuff.Can't waint for the next one.
Gugrel
Brilliant, insightful page-turner on what it is like to prosecute murders in an overworked big-city homicide unit. Reuland is a superb writer and must be one heck of a good lawyer. Unlike many (but not all) lawyer-writers, he gets it right. Too bad this and Hollowpoint are his only two published books.
Kazimi
My son wanted this book for Christmas, so I looked it up, ordered it, and received it very quickly. Thanks!
Atineda
I have loved all of Robert Reuland's novels that I have read in this series. I only hope he writes more!!!!!!!
Mogelv
I agree both with the people who liked this novel and with those who didn't. The level of writing is well above average, as is knowledge of the subject. Both are so welcome after a J. D. Robb "In Death" novel which is utterly mediocre in comparison.

Except... Mr. Reuland absolutely refuses to use a contraction (e.g. "won't" or "can't") so ALL the dialog (uneducated criminals included) is unbearably stilted. "She will not tell me, and I cannot insist, because we had not...". Nobody talks or thinks like this. How an otherwise perceptive writer could be so obtuse or so self-indulgent - and his editor permit it - is beyond me. It's like avoiding every word with the letter 'e'. Even in the excellent reading by Jason Collins this soon becomes excruciating. I soon began listening as much for an exception to this as to the relatively modest plot. Result: one contraction noted in the entire book.

Also, as mentioned by another reviewer, conversations between the principals are often unrealistically fragmented. People are constantly breaking off just when they're about to explain something important. This authorial trick creates many misunderstandings to advance the plot, but after a few of these the reader is thinking "just spit it out, for heavens sake!".

Mr. Reuland is a talented author and could easily do without the idiosyncrasies I'm criticising. I hope he'll iron these out of his future books. But, what author ever pays attention to the lay reader's opinion?
Tetaian
SEMIAUTOMATIC is Robert Reuland's second book following on from his impressive debut with HOLLOW POINT. Like his first book it is set in Brooklyn and features homicide prosecutor Andrew Giobberti. Also, like his first book, SEMIAUTOMATIC focuses heavily on the legal system and the faith that the central characters place in it.

It's been eighteen months since the events of HOLLOW POINT took place and Andrew Giobberti has been removed from his position in the DA's Homicide Bureau to the safer, more sedate dead end that is the Appeals Bureau. But now the DA has decided that Gio has served his penance and is now ready to prosecute homicide cases again.

The homicide case in question is the shooting of the owner of a bodega by a young black man who was robbing the store. At first glance it looks like a straightforward case with a witness who has identified Haskin Pool, the defendant, and is willing and able to testify to what he saw. But after reading through the case records, Gio can't help but feel that there is something more to the case that he's not been told about.

Gio is taking over the case from Laurel Ashfield, a young prosecutor who has been recently appointed to the Homicide Bureau. Laurel had worked the case from the moment it broke until trial only to have Gio brought in to take over at the last minute. Gio expects her to be resentful of him for being bumped to second chair, but surprisingly she is anything but. The reason that she's not is the big mystery of the story. It starts out as a nagging itch but soon leads to the greatest cause for division between the two lawyers.

This is a rather unusual book because although it revolves around a murder trial and features the prosecuting attorney who is trying the case, we never really experience any of the usual courtroom drama scenes. The only time the courtroom comes into play is in between sessions with Gio and Laurel discussing points of the case. As each day's proceedings actually begin we invariably fade to black and then cut to a later scene outside the court.

Social and moral values are put under the microscope as arguments from the younger, idealistic but rather naïve Laurel are countered by the more seasoned and realistic Gio. Reuland concentrates more on emotions and personalities pushing this mystery into a category beyond the mere legal thriller standing. It's dark, confrontational and proceeds to grab your attention as the true story of the case gradually unfolds.