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Download 42 Days for Murder ePub

by Roger Torrey

Download 42 Days for Murder ePub
  • ISBN 1596548673
  • ISBN13 978-1596548671
  • Language English
  • Author Roger Torrey
  • Publisher Black Mask (December 15, 2009)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats mbr lrf mobi rtf
  • Category Mystery and Suspense
  • Subcategory Thrillers and Suspense
  • Size ePub 1718 kb
  • Size Fb2 1222 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 910

Here is a smashing, red-blooded mystery yarn, packed with fast action. This is crime as the police in "open" towns known it; hard-boiled detectives and as tough a collection of criminals as can be found in any metropolitan line-up. Between the wealthy society woman and her husband stood gangsters, white slavers and dope runners. Detective Shean Connell breaks the case in the lustiest story since Dashiell Hammett.

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I said: It's early in the day for that, even for Joey. But I wouldn't let it bother me. Lester's tone showed it bothered him plenty

CHAPTER ONE. LESTER came in my office with the sun hitting his glasses and making them shine like headlights. He said: Joey Free and some other man are outside and want to see you. He stopped, took off his glasses and started to polish them. I said: It's early in the day for that, even for Joey. Lester's tone showed it bothered him plenty. He had the notion Joey Free built the world and then a neat little picket fence around it. And Lester's only nineteen and doesn't appreciate the solid joy a drinking man takes with his drink. Then Joey and his friend followed Lester in. Joey is big and stocky, with a body like a keg.

Roger Torrey was a Black Mask pulp magazine mystery writer, but 42 Days for Murder was first published as a book by Hillman-Curl in 1938. Rated for sense of place and time. com User, November 13, 2009. He made a couple of key points. The first being that the 'lone man takes on a whole town' genre has a WHOLE lot of entrants, many of them from more prolific writers (. The second point was that the pacing of the book has its fits and starts, and that it slackens at the end when the genre inevitably rises to the cliched 'fever pitch.

Another noir murder mystery with a "flawed" detective, originally published in 1938, and by Roger Torrey. Originally published by Hillman-Curl as a "Clue Club Mystery" in 1938, 42 Days for Murder was the only novel published by Black Mask writer Roger Torrey during his lifetime. This one's about murder, gangsters, and corrupt politicians "Originally published by Hillman-Curl as a "Clue Club Mystery" in 1938, 42 Days for Murder was the only novel published by Black Mask writer Roger Torrey during his lifetime. Torrey was one of the "mystery men" of the Mask (along with Paul Cain and several others), in that very little is known about his life, although, like his private eye hero Shean Connell, he was apparently an inveterate gambler, alcoholic and barrel-house piano player, and he supposedly died in the arms of his mistress somewhere in Florida in the.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 1002 Kb. 42 Days for Murder. 113 Kb. Win, Place and Show. 278 Kb. Life Or Death. 202 Kb. Murder Backstage. 294 Kb. Clean Sweep. 64 Kb. 42 Day For Murder. 98 Kb. Mansion of Death.

Published by Hillman, NY, 1938. Shipping costs are based on books weighing . LB, or 1 KG. From The Metropolitan (Oakwood, GA, . Price: US$ 10. 0 Convert Currency.

Author: Roger Torrey 42 Days For Murder Roger Torrey Hillman ISBN: B00193XQU8 CHAPTER ONE LESTER came.

Author: Roger Torrey.

Talk about 42 Days for Murder


ZloyGenii
The original reviewer wrote a well constructed piece on 42DTM. He made a couple of key points. The first being that the 'lone man takes on a whole town' genre has a WHOLE lot of entrants, many of them from more prolific writers (e.g., Cain, Bellem). The second point was that the pacing of the book has its fits and starts, and that it slackens at the end when the genre inevitably rises to the cliched 'fever pitch.'

I can't disagree with either of those points, but I must say that I was really taken back in time to the early part of the last century when I read this. If you've ever heard about and been intrigued by 'wide open towns', 'roadhouses', or 'towns where the fix is in', then there are few finer books for you to hear with your own ear what it felt like to move around in one.

I agree that Bellem or Cain gives the reader more rock 'em, sock 'em pacing, but the machinations of the protagonist as he fights a town built to keep insiders safe and outsiders out really is quite interesting. There are many admirable scenes in this book that I would expect to find in someone like Jim Thompson, who could pull this stuff off without even breaking a sweat.

This is definitely a book for a narrow taste range, but if you have interest in what life was like in the west 70-80 years ago, and it was a hack of an interesting life even without the Internet, then dive right in.
watching to future
I have no doubt Roger Torrey knows what he's writing about. It has the feel of reality, and this original "Black Mask Boy" was by all accounts as hard-living as he was hard-writing. But 42D4M just wasn't very interesting, well-scribed or well-structured, compared to the masterpieces of this sub-genre: Red Harvest, Nightmare Town, Solomon's Vineyard, et al.
All these stories are about one man entering a corrupt town and taking it on basically by his lonesome. Here it is Reno, a town full of essentially legal dope and subsidized prostitution and easy divorce rackets (the headline comes from the six weeks necessary to establish residency and begin divorce proceedings). This is an interesting setting, bringing to mind the lawless frontiers of the old west in its evocations of the mafia-like criminal organization.
But the other stories I mentioned are eventful. This one is not especially so. Not a lot happens until the last 10 pages of this 160-page novel, when the factions engage in two gorily-detailed shootouts, which by the narrator's own admission last all of 10 seconds apiece.
A lot of this novel has San Francisco-based PI Shane Connell hiding in a flophouse. There are a lot of people doing a lot of hiding throughout this book. And a lot of characters who contribute little to the plot or to any greater meaning, including a bookworm sidekick who doesn't do much and seems out of place, except for giving Connell opportunity to spout off in a wise manner. And there are a lot of half-explained events. The plot has to do with a man from out east hiring Connell to find out why his wife went there and announced her plans to divorce him and refuses to talk to him. But mostly it consists of skulking around, trying to keep out of sight until all the angles and factions are figured, when it all explodes adequately but too briefly. Some people might find this to be fast-paced. But a lot of short chapters and quick scenes is not a fast pace if nothing really happens. I think there was a problem with the author's plot: the solution of the case and the motive were so inexorably tied together that we could not find out why things were happening the way they were until they were over. That didn't add suspense or interest for me; it merely made me impatient.
Additionally, there were lots of typographical errors in the text. Ordinarily that does not bother me; here the sheer number of them proved irksome. I don't know if they existed in the original or if they are the reprinter's fault. Either way, it added an air of slapdashery to a book I was losing patience with anyway. And the back cover gets a plot point wrong, too.
Torrey aspires to the screwball toughness of Bellem but comes up short too often, with a clunky tenor to a lot of his dialogue, redundancy to some more. It's rough-and-ready speech, all right, but it should still be poetry. (Chandler, anyone?) An example, describing an innocent-looking but experienced "lady": "She's been father under the barn for eggs than you've been away from the farm." One can understand this phrase, but it lacks a certain something.
Still, hard-boiled and funny writers like Bellem, Nebel and Latimer are the most apt comparisons, because Torrey tries so hard to be tough that there is nothing to do but be amused at some of it. His descriptions of his sidekick's ample, been-around-the-block girlfriend are especially harsh, such as when he says he could start a milk route with her, six bottles and one more cow. (Funny, but there's not enough of that kind of stuff in all.)
Tough, true, humorous in places, but ultimately unsatisfying.
Shistus
For ex-piano player turned private eye Shean Connell, it was spposed to be a simple divorce case. His moderately rich client comes home one day to find his wife of a few months packed up and gone to Reno to establish six weeks residency for divorce purposes. She refuses to see him and he and a friend are literally ridden out of town by the local police.

Connell soon finds more than he bargained for when two shots are taken at him, thugs keep trying to beat him up, and the wife's maid is found in an alley, a stab wound in her neck.

Our hero feels that last is the key.

He also has to deal with her sleazy lawyer, Feds, local cops, and an obstinate client that keeps putting himself in harm's way.

Published in 1938, this was the author's only novel, though he was a frequent contributor to the pulp magazines with over two hundred-eighty short stories and longer pieces.
Hirah
This book is available free on several sites as it is out of copyright. Someone took the file from there and published it to Amazon to make some money for themselves. Please don't support that type of semi-theft!