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Download Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor ePub

by Gérard Fontaine

Download Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor ePub
  • ISBN 2858225818
  • ISBN13 978-2858225811
  • Language English
  • Author Gérard Fontaine
  • Publisher Patrimoine (August 31, 2000)
  • Pages 141
  • Formats lit docx lrf txt
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1224 kb
  • Size Fb2 1527 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 855

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Charles Garnier's Opera: Architecture and Interior Decor Paperback. The books are packed with brilliant color photographs: the exceptionally well-written and entertaining texts have ben gracefully translated into English.

Charles Garnier's Opera: Architecture and Interior Decor Paperback. The OPÉRA is the most sublime, most outrageous, most opulent, most ostentatious, must uninhibited, most gratifying manifestation of 2nd Empire Beaux-Arts style (of which, in fact, it is the progenitor and most important example) in all of architecture. Viewing it for the first time, one cannot but shiver with pleasure.

Charles Garnier's Opéra book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture And Exterior Decor as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Find signed collectible books: 'Charles Garnier's Opera: Architecture and Interior Decor'.

L'opera de Charles Garnier Architecture et Decor Exterieur. ISBN 9782858225798 (978-2-85822-579-8) Softcover, Patrimoine, 2000. Find signed collectible books: 'Charles Garnier's Opera: Architecture and Interior Decor'.

We have carefully checked this article for you! L'Opéra de Charles Garnier : Architecture et décor intérieur by Gérard Fontaine %7c Book %7c condition very good. We ask you to make a distinction between a complaint and cancellation. We try to assess the exact condition of the goods as objectively as possible. Read full description.

Gérard Fontaine Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor. ISBN 13: 9782858225811. Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor.

Charles Garnier's Paris Opera: Architectural Empathy and the Renaissance of French Classicism by Christopher Mead, MIT Press, 1991. Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor by Gérard Fontaine, 2000. Charles Garnier's Opera: Architecture and Interior Decor by Gérard Fontaine, 2004. Paris Opera House: Scale Architectural Paper Model by Jean-William Hanoteau, 1987. Source: Architecture through the Ages by Talbot Hamlin, Putnam, Revised 1953, pp. 599-600.

Jean-Louis Charles Garnier (pronounced ; 6 November 1825 – 3 August 1898) was a French architect, perhaps best known as the architect of the Palais Garnier and the Opéra de Monte-Carlo. Charles Garnier was born Jean-Louis Charles Garnier on 6 November 1825 in Paris, on the Rue Mouffetard, in the present-day 5th arrondissement.

Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor, pp. 81–101. Paris: Éditions du Patrimoine. ISBN 9782858225811, with the exception that the title of Jouffroy's sculpture Poetry is taken from Garnier, Charles (1876). Le nouvel opéra de Paris: Statues décoratives, p. 2. Paris: Librairie générale de l'architecture et des travaux publics. to remix – to adapt the work.

The Palais Garnier (French: (listen), Garnier Palace) or Opéra Garnier (French: (listen), Garnier Opera), is a 1,979-seat opera house at the Place de l'Opéra in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, France

The Palais Garnier (French: (listen), Garnier Palace) or Opéra Garnier (French: (listen), Garnier Opera), is a 1,979-seat opera house at the Place de l'Opéra in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, France

Talk about Charles Garnier's Opéra: Architecture and Exterior Decor


Felolv
An interesting look at the exterior (the interior is covered in a separate volume) of this wonderful building, with lots of great photos and well-detailed information regarding its restoration.
unmasked
Gorgeous book. Unique architectural artistic masterpieces.
Jeb
CHARLES GARNIER'S OPÉRA: ARCHITECTURE AND EXTERIOR DECOR and the earlier companion volume CHARLES GARNIER'S OPÉRA: ARCHITECTURE AND INTERIOR DECOR are large, beautifully produced records of the recent complete restoration (nothing was left undone) of Charles Garnier's 1875 OPÉRA HOUSE on the right bank in Paris, not far from the Louvre. The books are packed with brilliant color photographs: the exceptionally well-written and entertaining texts have ben gracefully translated into English.

The OPÉRA is the most sublime, most outrageous, most opulent, most ostentatious, must uninhibited, most gratifying manifestation of 2nd Empire Beaux-Arts style (of which, in fact, it is the progenitor and most important example) in all of architecture. Viewing it for the first time, one cannot but shiver with pleasure. I find the exterior of the building, a fusion of neo-Baroque and neo-Classic elements, more interesting and more satisfying than the interior, which is a bit over the top even for my chorus girl's taste. While impressive, the public spaces inside the OPÉRA are so florid and extreme that one can only believe it's made of papier-mâché rather than of marble, bronze and gilt - oh, so much gilt!

But outside, what could possibly equal the 14 different colors and patterns of marble, the polychromatic columns with their gilded capitals, the sleek, nearly naked, bronze amazonian ladies entwined around ornate bronze lamp posts, the larger-than-life marble groups of naked young people (muses?) cavorting joyfully in celebration of the arts, the gigantic gilded bronze angels, arms and wings spread triumphantly, the even larger rearing bronze horses at the roof lines, and topping everything, the 30-foot high bronze statue of Apollo raising a golden lyre above his head like a victorious prize fighter while figures of music and poetry gaze at him admiringly. And what could surpass the hundreds of tons of stone garlands and acanthus leaves, cherubs, caryatids, rosettes, columns, scores upon scores of carved classical figures with their blank, other-worldly faces, niched busts of real but mostly dead people, balusters, innumerable pointed, curved and broken pediments, arches, lintels, escutcheons, dentils, rondels, oriels and on and on? With these and thousands of other elements, Garnier created a vast stone pastry, at once laughable and noble.

Looking at its facade from close up doesn't really give a good sense of just how enormous the 118,000 square-foot OPÉRA HOUSE is, a thing made possible by then cutting-edge industrial-age steel framing. Behind and above the deep vestibule, lobby and grand staircase is a huge, shallow, copper-covered dome (now verdigrised to a pale green), ribbed and extravagantly ornamented and capped with a gilded cupola, and beyond and above that, a shallow gable roof with an elaborate friezed pediment on the near end. These massive features are not visible from the street unless one is several blocks back.

Laughable or noble, ugly or beautiful, the OPÉRA was a magnificent expression of French grandeur, much beloved by well-healed Parisians, whose numbers, in those confident, optimistic decades, were increasing rapidly. And yet, the OPÉRA'S place in the flow of history is rather ambiguous. It marked the ascendency of an architectural movement which predominated in much of the West for nearly half a century despite increasing competition from other styles. But that movement itself marked the final flowering, or, in some eyes, the ultimate degradation of architectural traditions that had prevailed, on and off, for a substantial part of the preceding 2,000 years. When, after more than 15 years of construction, the OPÉRA opened in 1875, an unimagined and unimaginably cataclysmic future was already germinating. Whatever the OPÉRA'S brilliant facade reflected, it was not the future.

The OPÉRA which is a theater, it is itself the ultimate theatrical set: despite its enormous volume and mass, it doesn't look real, and we expect that at any moment, being an illusion, it may disappear behind a huge velvet curtain. This, of course, is what Garnier intended. One has much the same feeling when viewing the Trevi fountain in Rome.

For much of the 20th century, the OPÉRA and buildings like it were scorned and ridiculed for their very lack of modernity and thousands of them were destroyed. The International Style tyrannically and intolerantly swept aside all that had come before it; it was seven decades before its own emptiness became fully apparent. Thus, by the mid-80s, we saw the great modernist Philip Johnson desperately forsaking the sterile glass tower in favor of a skyscraper sheathed in pink stone and embellished with a giant pediment that, in a smaller guise, would crown a Chippendale highboy.

Today, the OPÉRA is no less revered than it was in 1875. For many, it is simply a charming curiosity. For others, the Opera's aesthetic virtues, such as they are, its extraordinary energy and exuberance, indeed, its very excesses far outweigh its flaws. Is the OPÉRA great art? When, in the bright Parisian sunlight, amidst swirling crowds and the ceaseless din of automobiles, you actually stand before this magical creation, the question becomes wholly irrelevant. And certainly, many of the OPÉRA'S spiritual children, such as Cass Gilbert's 1899-1907 United States Customs House in lower Manhattan, and his 1913 Woolworth building are indisputably great works of art.