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Download Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams: Explorations in Massively Parallel Microworlds ePub

Download Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams: Explorations in Massively Parallel Microworlds ePub
  • ISBN 0585025851
  • ISBN13 978-0585025858
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  • Size ePub 1236 kb
  • Size Fb2 1861 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 534


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Turtles, Termites, and T.has been added to your Cart. Mitchel Resnick's book is one of the very few in the field of computing with an interdisciplinary discourse that can reach beyond the technical community to philsophers, psychologists, and historians and sociologists of science. - Sherry Turkle, Professor, Program in Science, Technology, and Society, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Resnick (media laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology) explores the counterintuitive world of decentralized systems and self- organizing phenomena.

A very nice and easy to read book which introduce us to the massive parallel computational systems

A very nice and easy to read book which introduce us to the massive parallel computational systems.

Explorations in Massively Parallel Microworlds. And a surprising number of other systems, from termite colonies to traffic jams to economic systems, work the same decentralized way. Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams describes innovative new computational tools that can qhelp people (even young children) explore the workings of such systems-and help them move beyond the centralized mindset. Out of Print ISBN: 9780262181624 184 pp. 6 in x 9 in July 1994.

This book was set in Bembo by The MIT Press and was printed and bound in the United States of America. Turtles, termites, and traffic jams: explorations in massively parallel micro worlds, Mitchel Resnick

This book was set in Bembo by The MIT Press and was printed and bound in the United States of America. Turtles, termites, and traffic jams: explorations in massively parallel micro worlds, Mitchel Resnick. p. c. (Complex adaptive systems) Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-262-18162-2 (HB), 0-262-68093-9 (PB) 1. Parallel processing (Electronic computers) 2. Artificial intelligence.

oceedings{, title {Turtles, termites, and traffic jams - explorations in.

oceedings{, title {Turtles, termites, and traffic jams - explorations in massively parallel microworlds}, author {Mitchel Resnick}, year {1994} }. Mitchel Resnick. Part 1 Foundations: introduction the era of decentralization. Part 2 Constructions: constructionism LEGO/logo StarLogo objects and parallelism. Part 3 Explorations: simulations and stimulations slime mould artificial ants traffic jams termites turtles and frogs turtle ecology new turtle geometry forest fire recursive trees. Part 4 Reflections: the centralized mindset beyond the centralized mindset

Download Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams: Explorations in Massively Parallel Microworlds or any other file from Books category. Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams describes innovative new computational tools that can help people (even young children) explore the workings of such systems―and help them move beyond the centralized mindset. Download from free file storage.

Mitchel Resnick's book is one of the very few in the field of computing with an interdisciplinary discourse that can reach beyond the technical community to philsoophers, psychologists, and historians and sociologists of science.

Why relate this to our class? §Ant Colonies: A prototypical example of how complex- group behavior can arise from simple- individual behavior. Ant/Colony Relationship: Interesting way or model for thinking about other group/individual relationships. Learn how computer programs such as StarLogo can be used to stimulate multi- agent reaction.

Talk about Turtles, Termites, and Traffic Jams: Explorations in Massively Parallel Microworlds


Llallayue
First off I think the concept of decentralized systems and StarLogo
are fantastic. I was first exposed to starlogo at Berkeley
with Andrew Bagel(one of implementors of star logo)
as the presenter in class. I was impressed
with all of the nice programs he presented to the class.
A nice program that the book talks about is on graphics.
The program is short, just create a bunch of turtles in
the observer comand center(say 5000, write crt 5000 in the observer
command center) then in the turtle command center input
fd 20(or so, play with fd or forward for the distance of your liking).
A neat circle apears on the screen.Im talking about
the currnet version of Starlogo(year 2014).One trick
I found out is that you can form a filled circle by first by
creating a bunch of turtles(type crt 5000 in the observer command center
(say 5000 again) then in the turtle command center type
in fd random 20(whatever size you might like it).
Think of why going fd random 20 with a bunch of turtles at
the center of the pile will form this filled in circle(or
nearly filled in). To sum up I think this is a great book and it would be great
to read more books on the subject.
Alsath
Book needs some more content, it gives a good first level intro but does not develop it into more interesting/advanced things.

50% of the book is a 'sales' pitch for StarLogo.

If you have experience with writing code for simulations this book is a bit light technically.

Still has some interesting ideas in it.
Urllet
A beautiful little book with powerful ideas.
Well written, clear, concise.
I am very inspired, and am implementing a modern-day version of the concept.
Grinin
I found this book very inspirational. As an educator, I am interested in bringing elementary computer programming back to the primary and secondary school curriculum. (Programming disappeared in the early to mid 1990s.)
This book is for the teacher who wants to use computers to help kids (or grown-up kids-at-heart like myself) explore and understand the world around them. There is no software included with the book; rather, this is a book about the author's experiences in using the StarLOGO language to introduce children to parallel, distributed programming, a technique that enables modeling of the interaction of termites and ants, the flow of traffic, and the burn patterns of forest fires. Modeling the real world is an excellent way for kids to get excited about programming because the results are not as "abstract" as, say, simply drawing pictures on the screen or calculating monthly budgets. This is an "idea" book for educators looking for new ways to bring computing to our younger generations.
The book starts slowly and is very detailed at the beginning. I like that. The author describes some of the interactions he had with the kids he was teaching. Reading about the problems the kids faced and how he guided them to a solution was fascinating. Unfortunately, as the book progresses, the author seems to be in a "hurry" to finish: the programming anecdotes become less detailed and there are fewer pictures to illustrate the projects. I would have liked to read about them in more detail. That's the one shortcoming of this book.
If you're a teacher or computer-minded parent looking for ways to challenge your kids with new programming projects that model real life, this is a good book to read. It's not intended for your kids to read, nor is it a set of "canned" projects, but I think you'll find some good ideas in it.
Nirn
Mitchel Resnick shares a lovely sense of wonder, discovery and fascination in this slim, easily read volume about agent based modelling. Using micro-worlds (termites, ants and other modelling metaphors) Resnick shows us how collective behaviours are more than a simple sum of the parts - and through his experiments using StarLogo programming he shows the nature of emergent behaviours that come through decentralised thinking.

His reading list is a great starting point for anyone fascinated by Complexity and Agent Based Modelling, and so too is his elegant list of guiding heuristics that he has learned through toying with various ants, termites, forest fires and traffic jams.

- Positive feedback (in models) often plays a vital role.

- Randomness can help create order. Random isn't always chaotic.

- A Flock is not a big bird. The behaviour of groups should not be confused with the behaviour of individuals.

- A traffic jam is not just a collection of cars. Emergent objects have an ever-changing composition.

- The hills are alive. Don't just focus on the individual objects - look also at their environment.

This volume helped our research team design approach agent-based modelling, and put us in touch with other avenues of decentralised thinking: for example Network Theory. Best of all, Resnick helped us lighten-up. This book (and its subject matter) has profound ideas, but never loses a delicious sense of awe. Recommended.