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Download Crime and Punishment ePub

by Dostoevsky

Download Crime and Punishment ePub
  • ISBN 0553850156
  • ISBN13 978-1573353649
  • Language English
  • Author Dostoevsky
  • Publisher Wordsworth Classics (1994)
  • Formats azw txt rtf mobi
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1970 kb
  • Size Fb2 1303 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 878


Crime and Punishment, as well as being an horrific story and a compelling drama, is also extremely funny. The Times Literary Supplement, 'Books of the Year'. Crime and punishment.

Crime and Punishment, as well as being an horrific story and a compelling drama, is also extremely funny. Ready brings out this quality well. That knife-edge between sentimentality and farce has been so skilfully and delicately captured here. -The Times Literary Supplement, 'Books of the Year'. FYODOR MIKHAILOVICH DOSTOYEVSKY was born in Moscow in 1821 at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor, where his father worked as a doctor. His mother died in 1837 and his father two years later, rumoured to have been murdered by his serfs.

Crime and Punishment is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky. It was later published in a single volume

Crime and Punishment is a novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky. It was later published in a single volume. It is the second of Dostoevsky's full-length novels following his return from ten years of exile in Siberia. Crime and Punishment is considered the first great novel of his "mature" period of writing.

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FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY CRIME AND PUNISHMENT Foreword I want to do an unprecedented and eccentric thing, to write thirty printed sheets within the space of four months, forming two separate novels, of which I will write one in the morning and the other in the evening, and to finish them by a fixed deadline. Do you know, my dear Anna Vasilievna, that even now such eccentric and extraordinary things utterl. Читать онлайн Crime and Punishment.

The two popular translations of ‘Crime and Punishment’ before the 1993 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, were by Constance Garnett and David McDuff. The Pevear/Volokhonsky translation became my favourite – until Oliver Ready’s translation came along. Not knowing a word of Russian, I declare my favourite only by the enjoyment I derived from reading the book in English.

One of the most influential novels of the nineteenth century, Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment tells the tragic story of Raskolnikov-a talented former student whose warped philosophical outlook drives him to commit murder

One of the most influential novels of the nineteenth century, Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment tells the tragic story of Raskolnikov-a talented former student whose warped philosophical outlook drives him to commit murder. Surprised by his sense of guilt and terrified of the consequences of his actions, Raskolnikov wanders through the slums of pre-revolutionary St. Petersburg trying to escape the ever-suspicious Porfiry, the official investigating the crime.

Crime and Punishment book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Crime and Punishment as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Crime and punishment. Translator's preface. Though always sickly and delicate Dostoevsky came out third in the final examination of the Petersburg school of Engineering. A few words about Dostoevsky himself may help the English reader to understand his work. Dostoevsky was the son of a doctor. His parents were very hard–working and deeply religious people, but so poor that they lived with their five children in only two rooms. There he had already begun his first work, "Poor Folk. I want to do an unprecedented and eccentric thing, to write thirty printed sheets within the space of four months, forming two separate novels, of which I will write one in the morning and the other in the evening, and to finish them by a fixed deadline. Do you know, my dear Anna Vasilievna, that even now such eccentric and extraordinary things utterly delight me. I simply don't fit into the category of staid and conventional people.

Talk about Crime and Punishment


MrDog
The two popular translations of ‘Crime and Punishment’ before the 1993 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, were by Constance Garnett and David McDuff. The Pevear/Volokhonsky translation became my favourite – until Oliver Ready’s translation came along. Not knowing a word of Russian, I declare my favourite only by the enjoyment I derived from reading the book in English.

Many things may indeed be lost in translation, and many others get misrepresented but we may not know. The result of reading only the English versions is that one’s choice is largely subjective. Compared to the Garnett version, the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation seems very modern – until Ready’s came along. Little things like changing ‘had not’ to ‘hadn’t’ renders Ready’s version not only a little more modern but also more informal. That is not to say that the atmosphere of old Russia is lost. Ready uses ‘fibs’ for ‘lies’ (Pevear/Volokhonsky) in one passage.

Ultimately, the reader has to decide for himself which style he enjoys more. Here is a comparison from one of my favourite passages (there are many) from the book. I set out first the Pevear/Volokhonsky version then the Ready version:
“What do you think?” Razmumikhin shouted, raising his voice even more. “You think it’s because they’re lying? Nonsense! I like it when people lie! Lying is man’s only privilege over all other organisms. If you lie- you get to the truth! Lying is what makes me a man. Not one truth has ever been reached without lying fourteen times or so, maybe a hundred and fourteen, and that’s honourable in its way; well, but we can’t even lie with our minds! Lie to me, but in your own way, and I’ll kiss you for it. Lying in one’s own way is almost better than telling the truth in someone else’s way; in the first case you’re a man, and in the second – no better than a bird. The truth won’t go away, but life can be nailed shut; there are examples. (Pevear/Volokhonsky)

‘Now what are you thinking?’ cried Razumikhin, raising even more. ‘That it’s their lies I can’t stand? Nonsense! I like it when people lie. Telling lies is humanity’s sole privilege over other organism. Keep fibbing and you’ll end up with the truth! I’m only human because I lie. No truth’s ever been discovered without fourteen fibs along the way, if not one hundred and fourteen, and there’s honour in that. But our lies aren’t even our own! Lie to me by all means, but make sure it’s your own, and then I’ll kiss you. After all, lies of your own are almost better than someone else’s truth: in the first case you’re human; in the second you’re just a bird! The truth won’t run away, but life just might – wouldn’t be the first time.

Ready’s version has a table of chronological events and a fresh, inspiring introduction that will help the first-time reader understand and appreciate the context of ‘Crime and Punishment’
interactive man
This is Dostoyevski at his best - at least as far as this reader is concerned. This is a ‘complex’ story (in many respects) certainly with respect to the storyline: and, in the ‘typical’ Russian style, full of boiling emotion, honor, degradation and mystery. Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov, a young college drop-out, given to dark mood and brooding temperament sulks in his cramped, stuffy, oppressive little boarding house room and plans a murder. He has earlier published a pseudo-intellectual essay in which he postulates the ‘right’ of an ‘extraordinary’ person to even commit crime in the pursuit of a greater good. This ‘philosophy’ shared with the reader seems always in one way or another at the base of Rodion Romanovitch’s brooding conclusion:

“Yes, that’s what it was! I wanted to become a Napoleon, that is why I killed her. . . . Do you understand now?”

“I saw clear as daylight how strange it is that not a single person living in this mad world has had the daring to go straight for it all and send it flying to the devil! I . . . I wanted to have the daring . . . and I killed her. I only wanted to have the daring, Sonia! That was the whole cause of it!”

The storyline twists and turns and interleaves a series of characters that include the pathetic, the deceitful, the honorable, and the utterly hopeless. Dostoyevski makes the depth of the read much greater than the storyline itself, however. Raskolnikov is positively tortured within his own mind by the plan for murder, by the murder itself and by his pursuit by the predatory Investigating lawyer - Porfiry Petrovich. The writing amazes with its precision in describing the ebb and flood of emotion, scheming and shame that torment Raskolnikov. And, as usual in his novels, Dostoyevski explores the philosophical implications of good and bad, afterlife or darkness, and human consequence related to an interconnected universe. An old-fashioned Epilog ends the read giving the reader some 'closure' on Rodion and some moral 'conclusion' for Dostoyevski. Over 150 years old and still this book sets the high end for 5-stars.

Dover Thrift edition 2001, Translated By Constance Garnett