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Download International trade in ivory from the African elephant: Issues surrounding the CITES ban and SACWM's chances of overturning it (South African perspectives) ePub

by Mafaniso Hara

Download International trade in ivory from the African elephant: Issues surrounding the CITES ban and SACWM's chances of overturning it (South African perspectives) ePub
  • ISBN 1868083624
  • ISBN13 978-1868083626
  • Author Mafaniso Hara
  • Publisher Centre for Southern African Studies, University of the Western Cape (1997)
  • Pages 27
  • Formats rtf lit docx doc
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1196 kb
  • Size Fb2 1743 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 295


The ivory trade is the commercial, often illegal trade in the ivory tusks of the hippopotamus, walrus, narwhal, mammoth, and most commonly, African and Asian elephants.

The ivory trade is the commercial, often illegal trade in the ivory tusks of the hippopotamus, walrus, narwhal, mammoth, and most commonly, African and Asian elephants. Ivory has been traded for hundreds of years by people in Africa and Asia, resulting in restrictions and bans. Ivory was formerly used to make piano keys and other decorative items because of the white color it presents when processed but the piano industry abandoned ivory as a key covering material in the 1980s.

Publication, Distribution, et. Bellville, South Africa. Centre for Southern African Studies, (c)1997. Physical Description: 27 p. ;, 25 cm. Title: Southern African perspectives ; no. 65. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 26-27). Corporate Name: Southern African Centre for Ivory Marketing. Corporate Name: Southern African Convention on Wildlife Management. Corporate Name: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (1973).

The future of African elephants, and how to manage them, is in the . The international commercial trade in ivory has been banned since 1990.

The future of African elephants, and how to manage them, is in the spotlight at the wildlife trade summit in Geneva, Switzerland. Photograph by Michael Nichols, Nat Geo Image Collection. Animals Wildlife Watch. The controversial proposal -brought forward at the CITES meeting by South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, and Zimbabwe-was voted down by 101 of the 183 treaty members. The United States and the European Union were among those opposing the change. Twenty-three countries voted to support the proposal, and 18 abstained.

South Africa was also given the right to trade in hair and leather . ’International trade in Ivory from the African Elephant : Issues Surrounding the CITES ban and SACWM’s Chances of Overturning It’’, Centre for Southern African StudiesNo.

South Africa was also given the right to trade in hair and leather commodities. During the 2007 conference a nine-year moratorium on ivory trade was put into action. CITES main purpose for the moratorium of ivory trade was to provide a resting period and also prevent individuals practicing illegal ivory trade.

Increasingly, the discussion surrounding the international trade in ivory has focussed on potential revenue that . This paper provides an analysis of the ecological ideas which underpin policies of elephant management and ivory trading in African elephant range states

Increasingly, the discussion surrounding the international trade in ivory has focussed on potential revenue that could b. .This paper provides an analysis of the ecological ideas which underpin policies of elephant management and ivory trading in African elephant range states. Increasingly, the discussion surrounding the international trade in ivory has focussed on potential revenue that could be generated from the sale of stock-piled ivory and other products derived from elephants.

A block of southern African countries, where elephant populations are currently thriving, argue that ending. Some African countries want to sell off their huge ivory stockpiles and say their elephant populations are thriving. But charities and experts say any sale puts a value on all tusks – and that puts animals at risk from poaching. Adam Withnall Africa Correspondent withnall. Wednesday 21 September 2016 17:00.

African elephants in Kenya on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the world ivory trading ba.

African elephants in Kenya on the eve of the 20th anniversary of the world ivory trading ban. Photograph: Martin Harvey/AP. They have found that more than 14,000 products made from the tusks and other body parts of elephants were seized in 2009, an increase of more than 2,000 on their previous analysis in 2007.

Elephant populations continued to dwindle Following the findings of the study, the two organizations called for a worldwide ban on trade in ivory from the African elephant.

Elephant populations continued to dwindle. In Kenya alone the population plunged from 167, 000 in 1973 to just 16, 000 by 1989. At this 54 species in danger This content downloaded from 6. 21. Following the findings of the study, the two organizations called for a worldwide ban on trade in ivory from the African elephant. At the time, other elephant con- servation specialists countercharged that the report was based on inaccurate fig- ures and that it had deliberately exaggerated the reduction in the elephant pop- ulation.

Elephant numbers in Namibia and South Africa have also increased .

Elephant numbers in Namibia and South Africa have also increased according to the latest conservation status data on African elephants, based on a new full African Elephant Status Report (2016), the first of its kind since 2007. CITES regulates international trade in over 36,000 species of plants and animals, including their products and derivatives, to ensure their survival in the wild with benefits for the livelihoods of local people and the global environment. The CITES permit system seeks to ensure that international trade in listed species is sustainable, legal and traceable. CITES was signed in Washington . on 3 March 1973 and entered into force on 1 July 1975.

A disproportionate amount of the agenda at The 17th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) was dominated by African elephants and the controversial issue of the ivory trade. African elephants have declined by more than 100,000 over the past decade. This is driven to a large extent by the surge in poaching due to the rising price of ivory. The debate on how to respond to this crisis is very polarised.

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