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Download Title: BLUE LIGHT (UNABRIDGED) (1998) ePub

by Richard (reader) Ferrone,Walter Mosley

Download Title: BLUE LIGHT (UNABRIDGED) (1998) ePub
  • ISBN 078872911X
  • ISBN13 978-0788729119
  • Language English
  • Author Richard (reader) Ferrone,Walter Mosley
  • Publisher Recorded Books, Inc. (1999)
  • Formats docx lrf txt mbr
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1549 kb
  • Size Fb2 1316 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 400

Book by Mosley, Walter

Despite the success of his color-coded Easy Rawlins series, Walter Mosley dares, with Blue Light, to go where few mystery writers have gone before.

Despite the success of his color-coded Easy Rawlins series, Walter Mosley dares, with Blue Light, to go where few mystery writers have gone before. The novel is pure (if not simple) science fiction, less evocative of Philip Marlow than Philip K. Dick.

Walter Mosley's talent knows no bounds WALTER MOSLEY is the author of more than forty books, including eleven . Listen to books in audio format instead of reading

Walter Mosley's talent knows no bounds. Inside a Silver Box continues to explore the cosmic questions entertainingly discussed in his Crosstown to Oblivion. From life's meaning to the nature of good and evil, Mosley takes readers on a speculative journey beyond reality. WALTER MOSLEY is the author of more than forty books, including eleven previous Easy Rawlins mysteries, the first of which, Devil in a Blue Dress, was made into an acclaimed film starring Denzel Washington. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Powell Books interview of Walter Mosley. Walter Mosley on AALBC. Devil in a Blue Dress (1995). Always Outnumbered (1998). Johanna Neuman (September–October 2010). A radio interview with Walter Mosley Aired on the Lewis Burke Frumkes Radio Show the 2nd of April 2011.

This history is dedicated to Thucydides, the father of memory.

and Los Angeles Times Bestseller. A writer whose work transcends category and qualifies as serious literature. In Blue Light, Mosley details meticulously the grainy, disoriented insanity of being high on something-or-other in San Francisco during the Vietnam War years. He describes with mesmerizing clarity the hallucinatory twilight world of nightmares and euphoria inhabited by losers and drifters who move from one fix to another. This history is dedicated to Thucydides, the father of memory.

In a brilliant departure for Walter Mosley, author of the bestselling Easy Rawlins mystery series, Blue Light is a speculative novel about good and evil, the nature of humanity, and the ultimate purpose and fate of the human race.

Read full description. See details and exclusions. In a brilliant departure for Walter Mosley, author of the bestselling Easy Rawlins mystery series, Blue Light is a speculative novel about good and evil, the nature of humanity, and the ultimate purpose and fate of the human race.

Futureland: Nine Stories of an Imminent World (2001). Mystery writer Walter Mosley, whose 1990 novel, 'Devil in a Blue Dress,' was made into a movie starring Denzel Washington, is a 1970 graduate of Hamilton High School. a b c Johanna Neuman (2010) "The Curious Case of Walter Mosley", Moment Magazine. Walter Mosley biography, Royce Carlton incorporated. Powell Books interview of Walter Mosley.

Publisher: Little, Brown & Co. 1998. Publication Date: 1998. Despite the success of his color-coded Easy Rawlins series, Walter Mosley dares, with Blue Light, to go where few mystery writers have gone before. Synopsis: The human race has just begun. Those struck by the flashes immediately take on superhuman abilities.

Michael Moorcock enjoys Walter Mosley's masterful dissection of present-day America, Fortunate So. Walter Mosley's new book, a critique of the US war on terror, finds little favour among America's current political establishment. Published: 5 Sep 2003. Socrates of the streets.

Michael Moorcock enjoys Walter Mosley's masterful dissection of present-day America, Fortunate Son. Published: 11 Aug 2006.

Devil in a Blue Dress. Mosley describes his desire to write about black male heroes, citing that hardly anyone in America has done so. He explains that there are protagonists and supporting characters that are black males, but nobody else writes about black male heroes. Mosley has said that he prefers to be called a novelist as opposed to a black author.

Talk about Title: BLUE LIGHT (UNABRIDGED) (1998)


Kadar
During my entire reading of this book I wanted to be done with it. I just wanted to put it down and delete it from my Kindle. There wasn't anything or anyone in the book for me to care about. The book was just too far from reality. Maybe if I had been into psychedelic drugs . . ., but no. I kept asking myself, "Why am I still reading this?" I wouldn't recommend it to anyone, and I would have given it no stars except that the ending gave me a reason, an explanation, for the entire book. So I gave it three stars instead of zero.
Oreavi
This was only the second book I have read by Mosley. It has a well thought out story idea and some of the best Science Fiction I have ever read. Mosley's style is unique. He is an artist in this profession as demonstrated by the range of his work. I have read many (hundreds) of science fiction novels. This is some of the best I have ever read and takes Science Fiction in a new direction.
Glei
It begins during the 1960s, when flashes of extraterrestrial blue light enter the bodies of several Northern Californians. Those struck by the flashes immediately take on superhuman abilities.
allegro
Interesting story and so not typical Mosley fare, I enjoyed it. I was looking for a regular mystery but was satisfied.
Anayajurus
Not as free flowing as earlier books by Walter Mosley...It was a harder read then previous novels by the author
Felhann
Not Walter's best work....
Aver
I have read all of Walter Mosley's series' books and am now starting to chip away at the "oddities." And this one is definitely an oddity. I guess I was in a rut, not really reaching too far to be entertained. Escapist detective fiction with likeable protagonists and evil villains is what I am comfortable with. Hey, reminds me of television!

When I started this book I almost put it down, then decided to give it my full attention. It takes some work to read this and try to understand where it's going, it's real science fantasy, but with Mosley-like urban characters, a pretty cool mix. Clearly, not all Mosley fans are fans of this book. This would have been a very risky first book for an author, but when you've paid your dues you can put out some questionable material that might disappointment your mainstream readership. I don't love this book, but I respect the effort and look forward to reading the rest of Mosley's miscellaneous collection.
I can understand the disappointment of many of Walter Mosley's fans with this book; superficially, it has very little in common with his crime fiction. But, get rid of your preconceptions and your expectations because this is a profound and meditative exploration of what makes us human, of colour, of race, of poverty, of inequality. The writing is magnificent, characterised by bursts of seering linguistic and thematic improvisation. This is literature infused by the free-wheeling but fiercely disciplined spirit of Miles Davis, the transcendentalism of John Coltrane, and the black psychedelic journeys of Sun-Ra and George Clinton. This is pure and expressive journeying too, unencumbered by his own literary past or the expectations of his readers (which is probably why it confuses so many of them). What if ordinary, poor people were able to reach their full potential, that they could tear down the barriers imposed by a racist and unequal world? What if people came together to protect and nurture the earth? What if sociopaths and the insane could become whole people? What if people could really live together without judgmement? These might be unfashionable subjects to the cynical souls of literary critics, but they are profound questions, the really important questions, dealt with through the metaphorical struggle between the Blues, the transformed fully-realised humans, and the Gray Man, the archetypal representation of everything that is bad about humans and human societies. The evocation of atmosphere and mood, which vary from the most brutal and violent to the most tender and compassionately lyrical are unsuspassed in contemporary literature; the scenes in the forest-garden prior to the apocalyptic finale, and the downbeat coda are particularly fine. This is an exquisite, beautiful and ultimately painful allegory, destined to be misunderstood and reviled by the ignorant, the uncaring and those unwilling to suspend their expectations and take a leap into the unknown.