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Download Loose Ends ePub

by Neal Bowers

Download Loose Ends ePub
  • ISBN 0375506918
  • ISBN13 978-0375506918
  • Author Neal Bowers
  • Publisher Three Rivers Press (CA) (January 2001)
  • Formats rtf lrf azw lit
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1337 kb
  • Size Fb2 1937 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 611


Neal Bowers in Loose Ends challenges the reader’s morality with a book about a pathological liar. Neal Bowers was a Distinguished Professor of English at Iowa State University until his retirement in 2008.

Neal Bowers in Loose Ends challenges the reader’s morality with a book about a pathological liar. Davis Bank believes that he has never accomplished anything and feels as if his life is meaningless so he feels he must lie to make his life seem interesting. He feels as if lying connects people The shortest distance between two people is almost always a lie. He continues to reside in Ames, Iowa. Books by Neal Bowers. Mor. rivia About Loose Ends.

Neal Bowers was born and raised in Clarksville, Tennessee, but has lived the past quarter century in Ames, Iowa. Among his six previous books, the most recent are Words for the Taking: The Hunt for a Plagiarist (nonfiction) and Night Vision (poetry)

Neal Bowers was born and raised in Clarksville, Tennessee, but has lived the past quarter century in Ames, Iowa. Among his six previous books, the most recent are Words for the Taking: The Hunt for a Plagiarist (nonfiction) and Night Vision (poetry). He and his wife, Nancy, also a writer, are supervised by six very helpful cats. Библиографические данные. Random House Publishing Group, 2001.

A distraught Davis Banks arrives home for his mother's funeral. Davis teaches poetry at a small college. He loves words - but not himself. His father had died some years before, and now Davis discovers a lot of little things in his mother's house that don't seem right. Where are the keys to her car? In fact, he realizes he doesn't even know how or where she died. That night he visits his mother's gravesite, dug next to his father's. More from Neal Bowers. Published by Random House -.

A distraught Davis Banks arrives home for his mother’s funeral. This is the first mystery I have read that featured diabetes so prominently. I didn't know much about the disease or its potentially debilitating effects until I read LOOSE ENDS. Davis Banks is an interesting creation and I guess I'd have to say this is a page-turner, because I kept turning 'em, and even took it with me to the loo, when I couldn't wait any longer.

Loose ends : a novel. by. Bowers, Neal, 1948-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AprilV on January 5, 2010.

For nancy, Without whom I would be at loose ends. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading. Neal Bowers was born and raised in Clarksville, Tennessee, but has lived the past quarter century in Ames, Iowa. Among his six previous books, the most recent are Words for the Taking: The Hunt for a Plagiarist (nonfiction) and Nigh. ore about Neal Bowers. Category: Literary Fiction.

Neal Bowers (born Larry Neal Bowers, August 3, 1948 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is an American poet, novelist, memoirist, and scholar. 1971) from Austin Peay State University and the P. in English and American Literature from the University of Florida (1976). He taught for thirty-one years at Iowa State University, earning the highest academic rank awarded by the university, Distinguished Professor

Talk about Loose Ends


Gom
Davis Banks is at loose ends. His marriage is long gone; he is constantly near death or unconsciousness due to poorly managed diabetes (which also causes him to say socially inappropriate things that are probably true); he feels he is a flop as a minor poetry professor at a minor college. Then his mother dies. Banks must return for the funeral to Nashville, his boyhood town, where he will literally uncover secrets of his familial past in his father's grave. The socially unacceptable character who doesn't fit in with so-called normal society is reminiscent of Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis; I would also liken his writing and character to the tortured outcasts that populate The Night in Question by Tobias Wolff.
Neil Bowers is delightful. Far better known as a brilliant poet, Loose Ends contains flashes of that brilliance in his one and only novel.
Pedora
This is the first mystery I have read that featured diabetes so prominently. I didn't know much about the disease or its potentially debilitating effects until I read LOOSE ENDS. Davis Banks is an interesting creation and I guess I'd have to say this is a page-turner, because I kept turning 'em, and even took it with me to the loo, when I couldn't wait any longer. This novel has all the vital elements: sex (sorta), violence (mild), and drugs (well, insulin) - and I think there was even some rock an' roll in there - or was it country-western? I just finished reading two other books by Bowers: a volume of poems (Out of the South); a true-life mystery-thriller about plagiarism (Words for the Taking), of all things; and this book. And I would rank them in that order. His poems are superb. The plagiarism book is compellingly creepy. This book kept my attention, although the ending seemed just a little ... Well, inconclusive, I guess. Banks is, I would say, a good character in search of a slightly better story. Having said that, this is still a book worth reading. - Tim Bazzett, author of Pinhead: A Love Story
Enila
Neal Bowers first novel length fiction effort is a smart, funny, and emotionally loaded book. Bowers does a wonderful job with his diabetic narrator and his desire to invent a more interesting life for himself. Bowers, like David Lodge, sneaks in a few in jokes for those exposed to English Acadame, but the novel itself is wonderfully accessible.
That being said, despite what may seem to be an outlandish premise by discovering another man's body in his father's grave, the rest of the book is predictable from that point onward. There are few, if any surprises beyond the first fifty pages, and as such it takes some of the emotional punch out of the character arc.
That being said, the prose is a joy to read, the wit compelling, and the time spent on the book was well worth it, but it is not MUST HAVE reading.
Reggy
If you're going to read some Neal Bowers, I'd recommend you go for some of his poems or his nonfiction _Words for the Taking_, both of which are better than this. I like Neal, and I like his words. This is a pretty good novel, but I don't find his protagonist all that likeable, and thus this book doesn't hold me as well as it should. In contrast, _Out of the South_, his most recent book of poems, is downright excellent. It's too bad, of course, that most of his readers won't go beyond his prose works. Unless you do, you won't see him at his best.
Sharpmane
Neal Bowers whom I vaguely remember as the "wonder boy" of creative writing in college has written a most interesting, edgy novel set in his hometown. The book, readable in a couple of sittings, plays with language and our imaginations with his eccentric "hero". Somewhat Irvingesque in character, Davis Banks is the protagonist we don't want to be but can't help but become involved with. His detective acquaintance keeps us grounded and rationally involved with the plot. We must remember the author is an English prof and poet - we only get enticed with the plot. Characterization is the aspect of the book which really keeps us reading.
Ballalune
I breezed through this book in two evenings. Anyone interested in a quick, enjoyable read should pick it up. The characters probably aren't people that you know, but that makes it all the more worthwhile. Throughout the story, Bowers is able to instill a feeling of uneasiness or anxiousness in the reader that kept me flipping the pages to try and squash it.
Conjuril
Neal Bowers words pack a lot of power. They tell about few days in Davis Banks' life; a lot happens. You won't want to put the book down. But as you read it, and after you have read it, you realize that Bowers has told you something to think about. What is truth: the story you make up or the clues the detective searches out? How do you deal with your own death every day and keep living? Who were your parents, really? Davis Banks' adventures are an adventure for the reader too.