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Download The Gods Play Chess, Don't They? ePub

by Gilbert Moore

Download The Gods Play Chess, Don't They? ePub
  • ISBN 1604026081
  • ISBN13 978-1604026085
  • Language English
  • Author Gilbert Moore
  • Publisher Blue Logic (June 19, 2008)
  • Pages 206
  • Formats lrf docx lrf lit
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1620 kb
  • Size Fb2 1802 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 319

AS IT IS now played in both hemispheres on this planet, chess is war, total war, a war of annihilation. The opposing player is not just the opponent, he becomes the enemy who must be destroyed. Was it always like this? The thesis of this book is that it was not, that in its origins, in a faintly remembered time, chess was primarily a game of self-revelation used by initiates to the priesthood to study and transcend the internal warfare going on inside all of us all the time. Invented thousands of years ago, chess was played to teach initiates the art of esoteric warfare.

Start by marking The Gods Play Chess, Don't They? as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Gods Play Chess, Don't They? as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The thesis of this book is that it was not, that in its origins, in a faintly remembered time, chess was primarily a game of self-revelation used by AS IT IS now played in both hemispheres on this planet, chess is war, total war, a war of annihilation. The opposing player is not just the opponent, he becomes the enemy who must be destroyed. Was it always like this?

Tell us if something is incorrect. The Gods Play Chess, Don't They? Specifications.

If God played chess he would sack one of his pwans and after it is captured he will put it back on the board saying that the pwan has come back to life. Then everyone will start worshiping the Pwan. Some people argue the Pwan is actually a minor piece while some heretics say it was an illegal move. If God played chess he would sack one of his pwans and after it is captured he will put it back on the board saying that the pwan has come back to life.

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A gruesome war results in the old gods’ departure from earth. Eventually, their paths both lead back to the mighty Eze. But can they defeat the man who brought the gods themselves to their knees?

A gruesome war results in the old gods’ departure from earth. The only remnants of their existence lie in two girls. Twins, separated at birth. But can they defeat the man who brought the gods themselves to their knees? A Throne of Swans by Katharine & Elizabeth Corr.

They can outmaneuver them. Shay’tan's smile transformed into a predatory grin. You don't have enough respect for your pawns. He moved a second black pawn to overtake the white rook he'd just set up for a fall. No matter how powerful your court pieces, you will never have enough of them, especially if you keep throwing them away on trivial moves.

Moore did not think it was necessary to ask the lawyer for more details of the 'foolish stories'. Without thinking, Moore picked up the nearest book and threw it. It missed, and the rat did not move

Moore did not think it was necessary to ask the lawyer for more details of the 'foolish stories'. He paid his rent, and Mr Carnford gave him the name of an old servant to look after him. He came away from the lawyer's office with the keys of the house in his pocket. Dear God!' cried Mrs Wood, 'an old devil sitting by the fire! Take care, sir, take care. What do you mean?' asked Moore in surprise. It missed, and the rat did not move. So Moore again picked up the poker.

Talk about The Gods Play Chess, Don't They?


Kelezel
Hey, anybody out there on the chess circuit remember Gregory Blake? Yeah, the same Gregory Blake who used to make us wish we'd never played him (For those who don't know in 2006 Gregory was ranked No. 260 out of 3,265 players in the Jamaican Chess Federation -- the last year he competed before becoming ill.). Sadly Gregory passed away last year from cancer. Yeah our Bill Gates of chess is gone.

A year before he died, I e-mailed Gregory a copy of the manuscript of this book for his take on it, I couldn't figure it out (It was circulating among JFC players for comments). Here's what Gregory had to say: "Read it again, only this time, read it without the preconception that since you've been playing chess -- how long? 27 years, Brian, yes, damn near all your life --, you know what it's really about." He said a few other things about my game that I wish to keep private, and then he added this: "Playing the game does not mean you know what it's about. Bobby Fischer played the game, yes, the Bobby Fischer, he played it better than anybody else in the 20th century anywhere and better than anybody in America will ever play. But guess what: Bobby didn't know the game.

Bobby didn't know why it was invented to be played the way we play it. The author of this manuscript knows the game. How do I know? Because I taught him. Yes, I took this amateur, pathetically stumbling and fumbling around on the board, under my wing because he's bright, real bright, and I like him. And I taught him two things: how to play the game strategically and checkmate the opponent in a few moves with minimum losses, and then I taught him what the game is really all about. Its spiritual meaning. Yes, I taught him that too. And don't ask me how I learned that myself because I won't tell you. By the way, this guy scared me half to death by almost checkmating me a week after I taught him the game. After only a week he was focused. No more stumbling and fumbling. So go back, read his manuscript again."

I did, three times until I finally got it. And then the book came out last year. I bought it. Better than the manuscript. Evidently, the author is growing. He added a chapter on Bobby Fischer. I don't think I want to play him any time soon.

I give the book a five. 3 for the game, and 2 more for a discussion I would not have dreamed possible, of all things, the spiritual significance of chess.
Onaxan
I really enjoyed this book. To begin with, the graphic images, mostly photos, are captivating -- ancient Chinese chess boards, Persian chess pieces, African tribesmen playing mancala, Alice looking at the Red King snoring and fearing he will awaken and she will vanish! And playing cards seeming to drift across the page. Playing cards in a book on chess! How does that grab you?

It seems to me that there's something in it for everyone: Chess historians can raise their eyebrows at the suggestion casually tossed out like a hand grenade that chess has even the slightest connection to mancala, and Lewis Carroll fans can read with fascination the author's delightful discussion of the well known fact that Alice in Wonderland is an extended chess metaphor. For those fans of Alice who don't know, Alice is a pawn destined to reach the other side of the chess board and become a Queen. Chess buffs won't be disappointed either. The chapter on Bobby Fischer's Variation to the Ruy Lopez Opening and the Poisoned Pawn Variation he and Gary Kasparov made famous in the 1960's and 1970's will have those who know these openings scratching their heads in bewilderment at the very least. An inner esoteric meaning to the White King's Knight taking the bait in Poisoned Pawn and getting snuckered by Fischer's Red Queen's Pawn? And what's this White and Red business anyway? What happened to White and Black chess pieces?

It's challenging chess as you and I thought we knew it, the way quantum mechanics challenged classical physics, disappearing down the rabbit hole with it.
Era
I don't play chess, but I enjoyed reading this book immensely. The author's insistence on finding a spiritual significance in both the chess pieces and their moves fascinated me, and his discussion of the game's mysterious origins is quite interesting. But I have to confess I wasn't won over completely until I read his chapters on Alice in Wonderland. A Lewis Carroll fan myself, I could see this author had somehow gotten in touch with the source of Carroll's profound vision: his compassion and love for children. Like no one else I have ever read the author was able to somehow enter the very same mindset Carroll entered -- the mindset of an eight year old girl living her life like the rough and tumble adventures of a pawn on a chessboard -- always needing to be rescued by her Knight. Am I learning the game? No, but if ever I do, you will have this book to thank for it.

Four stars (it might be 5 if I knew how to play and could follow the author's discussion of Bobby Fischer.)