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  • ISBN 1409114112
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  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 160


The Long War series that Poseidons Spear is a part of is just as good or better. Cameron's books not only have great drama and action but they delve deep into the subjects of human rights, honor and so many other theologies

The Long War series that Poseidons Spear is a part of is just as good or better. Cameron's books not only have great drama and action but they delve deep into the subjects of human rights, honor and so many other theologies. I consider the first two books of the long war series (Killer of Men & Marathon) to be a little better than this one but make no mistake this is an amazing read that will torture you when you have to put it down

Christian Cameron Poseidon's Spear Prologue So - here we are again. Читать онлайн Poseidon's Spear.

Christian Cameron Poseidon's Spear Prologue So - here we are again. Last night, I told you of Marathon - truly the greatest of days for a warrior, the day that every man who was present, great or small, remembers as his finest. But even Marathon - the great victory of Athens and Plataea against the might of Persia - did not end the Long Wa. n fact, thugater, an honest man might say that the Battle of Marathon started. So - here we are again.

God of War. Poseidon’s Spear. Chitoniskos A small chiton, usually just longer than modesty demanded – or not as long as modern modesty would demand!

God of War. Chitoniskos A small chiton, usually just longer than modesty demanded – or not as long as modern modesty would demand! Worn by warriors and farmers, often heavily bloused and very full by warriors to pad their armour.

Cameron, Christian nd founded a new settlement at Massilia, we should sink into such abjectness of spirit as to submit to the dictates of those whose masters we have always been. Throughout our history. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Poseidon's Spear book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Poseidon's Spear (Long War, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

So - here we are again. In fact, thugater, an honest man might say that the Battle of Marathon started the Long War. But even Marathon - the great victory of Athens and Plataea against the might of Persia - did not end the Long War. Until Marathon, there was the failed revolt of the Ionians, and any sane man would have said they had lost. That the Greeks had lost.

Poseidon's Spear (The Long War) by Cameron, Christian Book The Cheap Fast Free.

Онлайн библиотека КнигоГид непременно порадует читателей текстами иностранных и российских писателей, а также гигантским выбором классических и современных произведений. Все, что Вам необходимо - это найти по аннотации, названию или автору отвечающую Вашим требованиям.

An epic novel from the master of historical fiction, author of ALEXANDER: GOD OF WAR 'Brilliantly evoked' Sunday Times Arimnestos of Plataea is a man who has seen and done things that most men only dream about. Sold into slavery as a boy, he fought his way to freedom - and then to everlasting fame: standing alongside the Athenians at the Battle of Marathon where the Greeks crushed the invading Persians. Sometimes, however, a man's greatest triumph is followed by his greatest sorrow

An epic novel from the master of historical fiction, author of ALEXANDER: GOD OF WAR 'Brilliantly evoked' Sunday Times. Arimnestos of Plataea is a man who has seen and done things that most men only dream about.

Talk about Poseidon's Spear (The Long War)


Leyl
Well all I can say is read this and everything else Christian Cameron has wrote and will write. The tyrant series was a eye opener for me. The Long War series that Poseidons Spear is a part of is just as good or better. Cameron's books not only have great drama and action but they delve deep into the subjects of human rights, honor and so many other theologies. I consider the first two books of the long war series (Killer of Men & Marathon) to be a little better than this one but make no mistake this is an amazing read that will torture you when you have to put it down. Cameron has really done his homework so you get a good layout of what all played out in this time in history & what it was truly like to live back then and maybe what it was like to talk to the great minds of the time. Read all of Camerons work. You will always be glad you did.
Bele
good product good service
Jazu
I THINK CHRISTIAN CAMERON IS A GREAT AUTHOR. HIS CHARACTERS ARE BELIEVABLE AND ENGAGING AND YOU LEARN A LOT OF HISTORY WHILE BEING ENTERTAINED.
Qusicam
Great continuation of killer of man, will not dissapoint you. Lot's of action from the ifrst to the end, keeping the same story teller format than the first one. Interesting and unsuspected ending.
Balladolbine
Arimnestos' adventures take an unexpected turn when he leads an expedition into the Atlantic, where we run into Kelts, Gauls, Britons, and Iberians. Unlike the great political events of the previous novel, this novel is filled with skirmishes and raids. Cameron knows how to torture his protagonist and we can never be too sure of how things will fare for Arimnestos. Our protagonist's fortunes run the gauntlet from slavery to riches, desperate despair to love, and back again.

Cameron is my favorite historical fiction author, and this series is my favorite of his works. Poseidon's Spear was impossible to put down.
Kata
This book gives a glimpse of the gloominess of being a slave on a ship in ancient times in the beginning, then as it gets rolling when arminestos finds his rag tag bros, it almost turns comedic in a way with the characters talking to each other in different languages because of them meeting while in chains. Christian Cameron gives such great detail to his stories. Never a dull moment with arminestos of platea.
Dark_Sun
Book received on 11 September 2012

I was rather surprised by this book, although it was a very agreeable surprise. I was expecting, perhaps like others will have, that we would get treated to Arimnestos serving abroad as a mercenary captain, perhaps in Sicily, in the ten years or so that separate Marathon from the second phase of the Greco-Persian Wars. I got it entirely wrong.

Instead, I found something both better and more original, with the hero attempting to commit suicide, picked up and ending up as an almost broken and tortured slave on a Carthaginian ship. He does manage to survive and get away, but more by luck - and almost miraculously - than by any heroic feat. He does get to Syracuse, but cannot get back to a normal life and leaves with some companions on a voyage that seems to be a bit of mix between Jason's quest for the golden fleece and Ulysses' peregrinations across the Mediterranean. Except that this is a rather different story. Arimnestos and his crew seek to discover from where the Carthaginians get their tin from, a secret that these seek to keep at all costs in order to continue to corner the market as they had been doing for so long.

As usual, Christian Cameron tells a superbly well-researched and well-structured story.

Arimnestos was, as the author mentions, a true character and did command the Plateans at Marathon. I think he also took part in the battle of Platea against the Persians. A number of the other characters that we come across in the book, such as Cimon, the son of Miltiades, or Aeschyle, who also fought at Marathon, are also historical. So is Gelon, the Tyrant of Syracuse, whose policies and personality in the book also reflect what can be found in the historical sources. Then we get the somewhat complex, torn and twisted personality of the hero himself who, given the ordeal that he has gone through, has for a time lost (somewhat understandably!) quite a bit of his self-confidence. Unlike another reviewer, I was not particularly sucked into the emotions of the hero. Although the changes that he go through and what would perhaps qualify as some king of very serious post traumatic disorder nowadays are very interesting, I admit that I have no idea as to whether this is realistic or not. It feels just about possible, if not always entirely plausible, given what he is put through.

Another fascinating theme is the descriptions of the Punic and Phoenicians, the lands to the West, the "Outer Sea" (our Atlantic) and the very nasty surprises that it could reserve for sailors in galleys used to the Mediterranean. Here, as he mentions himself in his note, Christian Cameron has used Robin Lane Fox's "Travelling Heroes", probably along a number of other sources. The Phoenicians founded colonies across North Africa, Spain, Sicily and Sardinia of which Carthage (which means the new city in Phoenician) was the most powerful and is the most well-known.

Initially, they built themselves a commercial Empire across the Mediterranean made up of a collection of trading posts. They were indeed infamous for slave trading, although they were not the only ones. They were also famous for the gold and - even more so - for the large amounts of silver that they brought back from Spain and which, initially, was necessary to pay the Assyrian Kings their tribute so that their mother cities (Arados, Tyr, Sidon, Byblos etc...) would not be destroyed. Finally, and this is the item Christian Cameron insists the most upon, they had access to the very large quantities of tin mined in what is now Cornwall. As the book shows, there was tin elsewhere around the Mediterranean, but in much smaller quantities. The relative rarity of what was one of the two main ingredients needed to make bronze (the other was copper) whose use was ubiquitous in the Ancient Mediterranean and remained so for centuries even after smiths started working iron, explains the mystery and extreme measures that Punic and Phoenician cities took to preserve the secrecy of their supply source and prevent anyone else, and Greeks in particular, from accessing it by sea. This is one of the reasons why a land route along the Rhône and then the Seine valley was developed by the Greeks, although, as well shown in the book, it was much more precarious.

Yet another interesting feature is the descriptions of the various non-Greek and non-Punic populations included in this book: the Illyrians, the Iberians, the Vascons (ancestors of the modern Basques), the sailing Venetae that initially caused so much trouble for Caesar over four hundred years later, but also the Bretons from Dumnonia and the Senons and the Aedui from actual Burgundy. Here, of course, some readers (including myself) might want to quibble and howl about anachronisms for the terms used are the Latin ones, at a time when, as Christian Cameron reminds us of in the book, Ostia was a little village and Rome a little town. They are, however, the only names we happen to have. We do not know what the Carthaginians and other Punics might have called them, since we have almost no written sources from them. Neither do we have specific tribe names coming from Greek sources. Apart from this, there are a few other minor points. The excellent Gallic wine coming from the region around actual Bordeaux or the rock jutting out and joined to the land at low tide but surrounded by water at high tide (Mont Saint Michel) are just two examples. Another is the use of barrels made of wood, which was genuinely a Celtic invention, although vines do not seem to have been cultivated in Gaul at the time. They were brought over by the Roman colonists well after this book's story and wine was in fact one of the main exports to Gaul, along with pottery and vases. Gallic nobles spent fortunes on imported wines, and paid for them in gold (there were gold mines in the Massif Central, for instance) and silver.

One last point is that while this book is both surprising and original, it does have, contrary to what another reviewer seemed to mention, its fair share of fights and battles and boarding actions. However, these are essentially small actions, ambushes, raids and other surprise attacks conducted by Arimnestos and his sea raiders against outposts, small towns and settlements, and other ships at sea, but all of them are just as well told and exciting as any tale of the battle of Marathon. As the author clearly shows, piracy was very common at the time. It has being going on for centuries and continued for many more centuries, at least up to the end of the Roman Republic. Also, the ship descriptions are very good. They show, in particular, that there were numerous types of triremes and that these were not yet the most common and standing warship, although they were replacing the triakonters and pentakonters that seem to have been in use at least since the Trojan war.

Despite a few minor glitches - I got a bit confused with the wind directions at some point of the story, but then I am no sailor - this book is for me the best so far in the series, possibly because I found it both surprising and original. Finally, for those wanting to read a bit more, I can recommend the following:

- Two relatively recent and superb books on, respectively, the Athenian Navy ("Lords of the Sea", by John R. Hale) and Carthage, its Empire and its civilization ("Carthage must be destroyed", by Richard Miles

- There are also two older books which both remain among the very best in their respective fields: Peter Green's "Greco-Persian Wars", which will also be useful for the next volumes on Arimnestos, and the Age of the Galley (editor Robert Gardiner) for those with a particular interest in warfare under oars in the Mediterranean.
This thrilling and exciting book by Christian Cameron is the 3rd volume of the "Killer of Men" series.
The story-telling is again of a very high quality, and the author has the ability to bring all his characters, whether real or fictional, vividly to life.
Like it predecessors the book contains a lot of quality historical details, including an informative glossary and also notes on Names and Personages.
The main character of the book and also the narrator of these stories is Arimnestos of Plataea, who after the famous Battle of Marathon of 490 BC, which brought him fame and glory, returns home only to find that his wife Euphoria has died in childbirth.
Out of desperation he throws himself of a cliff into the sea, only to be pulled up and to be placed as a slave to an oar of a Phoenician trireme.
And so a journey begins for Arimnestos which will take him beyond the edge of the known world in a quest for freedom and revenge.
A really great book, one I would like to recommend to anyone, because its a "Fantastic Ancient Greek Tale"!