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Download How the Pope Became Infallible: Pius IX and the Politics of Persuasion ePub

by August Hasler

Download How the Pope Became Infallible: Pius IX and the Politics of Persuasion ePub
  • ISBN 0385158513
  • ISBN13 978-0385158510
  • Language English
  • Author August Hasler
  • Publisher Doubleday; 1st edition (1981)
  • Pages 383
  • Formats lrf azw azw mbr
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1747 kb
  • Size Fb2 1104 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 228

In a moment of candor and humility, the late Pope Paul VI admitted that the papacy itself - and specifically the doctrine of papal infallibility, fought for so relentlessly by his predecessor, Pius IX - is one of the greatest obstacles to Christian reunion. How that doctrine went from being a minority opinion at the beginning of the nineteenth century to a solemnly defined dogma at the First Vatican Council in 1870 makes for the fascinating story of personality conflicts, papal politics, and doctrinal transformations that the Swiss historian August Berhard Hasler recounts in this controversial book. At center stage is the redoubtable Pius IX, for whom the achievement of a binding conciliar definition of papal infallibility became a crusade, if not an obsession. Hasler details how he bullied and coerced opponents of the definition and hounded doubters after the doctrine was proclaimed by having their works placed on the Index of Forbidden Books, Did the pope's epilepsy influence his behavior? Did the pressures ha and his allies exerted on the waverers among the bishops render the Council unfree and its decisions of questionable validity? These are the kinds of questions Father Hasler raises in his thought-provoking and ultimately constructive effort to reopen debate on the major issue that still divides Christians and makes headlines more than a century after the doctrine was solemnly proclaimed.

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August Bernhard Hasler (died in 1980) was a Swiss priest and historian, "who served for five years in the Vatican Secretariat for Christian Unity . If the pope was infallible, then his bull Unam sanctam must also be considered infallible.

If the pope was infallible, then his bull Unam sanctam must also be considered infallible. Today no one bothers to defend this bull anymore.

Hasler details how he bullied and coerced opponents of the definition and hounded doubters after the doctrine was .

Hasler details how he bullied and coerced opponents of the definition and hounded doubters after the doctrine was proclaimed by having their works placed on the Index of Forbidden Books, Did the pope's epilepsy influence his behavior? Did the pressures ha and his allies exerted on the waverers among the bishops render the Council unfree and its decisions of questionable validity? . Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.

Pope Pius IX (1846–1878), during whose papacy the doctrine of papal infallibility was dogmatically defined by the . The infallible teachings of the Pope are part of the Sacred Magisterium, which also consists of ecumenical councils and the "ordinary and universal magisterium".

Pope Pius IX (1846–1878), during whose papacy the doctrine of papal infallibility was dogmatically defined by the First Vatican Council.

August Bernhard Hasler: Pius IX, Päpstliche Unfehlbarkeit und 1. Vatikanisches Konzil. The Allocution of Pope Pius XII on the Fourth Centenary of the Gregorianum.

Roger O'Toole, August Bernhard Hasler, Peter Heinegg. Sociological Analysis, January 1982, Oxford University Press (OUP). The authors haven't yet claimed this publication.

In a moment of candor and humility, the late Pope Paul VI admitted that the papacy itself - and specifically the doctrine of papal infallibility, fought for s.ISBN13: 9780385158510.

Recommend this journal.

POPE BECAME INFALLIBLE; Pius IX and the Politics of Persuasion. HASLER, August Bernhard.

HOW THE POPE BECAME INFALLIBLE; Pius IX and the Politics of Persuasion. Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, 1981. HOW THE POPE BECAME INFALLIBLE; Pius IX and the Politics of Persuasion. Through the years, we have issued over 50 catalogues of general antiquarian and literary materials, along with 30 catalogues relating to Japan and East Asia. Visit Seller's Storefront.

August 3, 2010 History. Pius IX and the politics of persuasion. 1st ed. by August Hasler. How the Pope became infallible Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove How the Pope became infallible from your list? How the Pope became infallible. Published 1981 by Doubleday in Garden City, .

Talk about How the Pope Became Infallible: Pius IX and the Politics of Persuasion


Gardataur
One needs to be interested in the history of Christianity and the Catholic Church's role (obviously important and subject to wide differences of opinion) in that history before this book becomes interesting, but if that is the case one either knows this book or should know it. Again there will be wide differences of opinion on this particular doctrinal aspect but since the Roman Church's concept of its' infallibility is such a major barrier to ecumenism with all other Christian Churches (not to mention the problems this doctrine causes within the Roman Church itself) this is a subject of monumental importance. Having said that, this is not easy reading for a Christian of any persuasion. The details supporting the author's viewpoint exhaust one's concentration but the story is in the details. One should also read "Infallible? Subtitled "An Enguiry" by Hans Kung when reviewing this subject. Between the two books one will gain a concept of the history and implications of this dogma and of it's consequences to all Christians.
Frdi
Fascinating.
Xellerlu
August Bernhard Hasler (died in 1980) was a Swiss priest and historian, "who served for five years in the Vatican Secretariat for Christian Unity, concentrating on work with Lutheran, Reform, and Old Catholic churches. It was during this time that he was given access to the Vatican Archives and discovered diaries, letters, and official documents that had never been studied before." He wrote in the Foreword to the first (1978) edition, "Until very recently there had been no historical study of the way the solemn definition of papal infallibility came about and why this happened precisely in 1870. In the late summer of 1977 I published a two-volume work dealing with these problems... in this book I would like to make the most important findings of my investigation available to a broader reading public, presenting these results within a historical framework ... The opening up of numerous archives and the publication of several historical studies have altered our idea of the events which led to the dogma of infallibility... The Vatican dogma is not merely one of the greatest obstacles in the path to Christian unity, it also blocks reform within the Church and, generally speaking, supports the spirit of authoritarianism in the community at large."

He notes, On June 18, 1870, emotions were running high in the great hall of the [First Vatican] Council. A Dominical cardinal, Filippo Maria Guidi had come forward to speak against the pope and the Infallibilists (the first Roman prelate to do so), emphatically stating that the pope was not infallible in and of himself, independent of the Church, but only insofar as he reflected the views of the bishops and the tradition of the Church... That very evening Pius IX had Cardinal Guidi called in and bitterly castigated him for his speech. In reply to Guidi's protest that he had only spoken as a witness to tradition, the pope snapped back at him with the oft-repeated phrase, "I am tradition.' ... We know astonishingly little about this cardinal, the only Roman prelate who dared to challenge Pius IX in public for any length of time. In the historical literature his name is passed over in silence." (Pg. 89-91)

He says, "But the minority had a still weightier objection: Some of the popes had themselves become teachers of error. The most famous case was Pope Honorious I (625-38)... Alongside him Pope Liberius (352-66) was also mentioned as a heretic. He made common cause with the Arians... Pope Vigilius (537-55) had also been accounted less than orthodox. Under pressure from the emperor of Byzantium, Vigilius in his weakness ... disavowed de facto the doctrinal resolutions of the Council of Chalcedon, whereupon the bishops of North Africa excommunicated him. The minority bishops then counted up a whole series of popes who, in the following centuries, committed errors on questions of marital ethics, the sacrament of Holy Orders, and issues regarding natural and international law. The minority regarded as especially compromising the case of Pope Boniface VIII... If the pope was infallible, then his bull Unam sanctam must also be considered infallible. But in it Boniface maintained he had secular authority over all Christians and declared that faithful obedience to the papacy was required for salvation... Today no one bothers to defend this bull anymore." (Pg. 163-164)

He elaborates about Honorius: "in an official letter ... [he] declared that he believed in the existence of only one will in Jesus Christ. A few decades afterwards this doctrine... was condemned as heresy by the Sixth Ecumenical Council... The anathema was expressly leveled at, among others, Pope Honorius. The Seventh Ecumenical Council ... repeated the anathema. These indisputable facts gave the Infallibilists all sorts of trouble even during the preparatory stages of Vatican I, and cast long shadows over the whole infallibility debate. The majority could not dare to deny the conciliar decrees, per se... But the Infallibilists nevertheless tried to cleanse Pope Honorious of the stain of heresy. Honorius, they insisted... had merely shown negligence in the struggle against heresy, and for that reason had been censured by the Council... They had a second argument ready just in case: Even if Honorius HAD been a heretic... The pope's letter ... could in no way be considered as an ex cathedra decision... [Yet] more crucial for the anti-Infallibilists ... was the fact that three ecumenical councils had called Honorius a heretic. Even the slickest interpretation could not make these facts disappear." (Pg. 165-166)

He quotes Bishop Georg Joseph Strossmayer: "There is no denying that the Council lacked freedom from beginning to end'" (Pg. 133) and "No power in the world will ever convince the world that the Council was really free.'" (Pg. 200) For his opposition at the Council, "Strossmayer had especially harsh treatment meted out to him. Rome ignored his urgent requests for help... he was informed ... that he would have to go on waiting for an answer until he had obediently accepted the conciliar decrees." (Pg. 201) But Hasler admits, "No less puzzling is the attitude of Bishop Joseph Georg Strossmayer. For years neither friend nor foe could move him to a declaration of submission... 'I'd rather die,' he protested... 'than go against my conscience and convictions...' But Strossmayer's resistance was visibly crumbling... Strossmayer... did not formally consent to the definition until 1881, when he made a profession of sorts under the pontificate of Leo XIII. At the end of his life he swore he had only opposed the dogma as inopportune." (Pg. 224-225)

He is actually critical of Hans Küng's proposal in Infallible? An Inquiry: "Küng's alternative proposal ... that the Church is indefectible in the truth... is undoubtedly much more acceptable than infallibilism because it offers more room for freedom. But is it also more consistent? And are not its critics correct in maintaining that a community such as the Catholic Church can only be held together, sociologically speaking, by a strictly authoritarian management...? Can the Church ever allow unconstrained research if it wishes to avoid the danger of self-destruction?" (Pg. 273)

He argues, "When is the pope infallible? The requisite conditions here are framed in such a way that it is almost impossible to say that such and such a decision must qualify as infallible. In particular, the stipulation that only ex cathedra decisions of the pope are infallible makes the definition of infallibility meaningless as far as the preceding centuries are concerned. Since the expression 'ex cathedra' was ... given various meanings until the nineteenth century, we can never confidently say we have [an] ex cathedra papal decision in any given case. So the definition of infallibility turns out to be empty words because it is compatible with any historical situation whatsoever.... it cannot be refuted or falsified... The conciliar minority at Vatican I recognized the evasiveness of such manipulative language and denounced it." (Pg. 280-281)

Obviously controversial, Hasler's historical study is nevertheless "must reading" for anyone seriously studying the issue of papal infallibility---whether one agrees with him, or not.
Gozragore
I bought the 1st Edition of Hasler's, How the Pope Became Infallible...can't remember the year, but it cost a monumental $14.95. To date, I haven't read a more complete and comprehensive history of the infallibility issue. I still have that book, filled wih my immediate comments while reading it. I was 34 at the time in the midst of a previous 16 year quest for 1. the right Religion, ( I had long settled on Christianity), (2.The right Denomination, and 3.The Right Church, I was debating Catholicism vs. Protestantism at the time as, not having found a "perfect" church, I had found and married a perfect wife, who happened to be a devout Catholic).
I'm purchasing another (book) before they all disappear so I can loan one out to our three generations of family and whoever.
Please erase the "Yogi's Corner". It was my byline for our High School Newspaper.