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Download The Book of Eve ePub

by Constance Beresford-Howe

Download The Book of Eve ePub
  • ISBN 0771011067
  • ISBN13 978-0771011061
  • Language English
  • Author Constance Beresford-Howe
  • Publisher McClelland & Stewart Inc.; F edition (2001)
  • Pages 208
  • Formats lit doc docx mbr
  • Category No category
  • Size ePub 1294 kb
  • Size Fb2 1448 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 222


The Book of Eve book. Montreal born, Constance Beresford-Howe published 10 novels including two more in the Voices of Eve series.

The Book of Eve book. First published in 1973, The Book of Eve has become a classic. She was reported to have had a happy marriage and sadly, her husband died two weeks after her death.

The book of Eve. by. Beresford-Howe, Constance. General, Fiction, General, Fiction, Fiction - General. Toronto : McClelland and Stewart.

Constance Beresford-Howe (10 November 1922 – 20 January 2016) was a Canadian novelist

Constance Beresford-Howe (10 November 1922 – 20 January 2016) was a Canadian novelist. Constance Beresford-Howe was born in 1922 in Montreal and graduated from McGill University with an BA and MA, and from Brown University, where she completed a P. She taught English literature and creative writing at McGill in Montreal and Ryerson University in Toronto until her retirement in 1988.

Constance Beresford-Howe wrote a delightful little book in 1973 called "The Book of Eve"

Constance Beresford-Howe wrote a delightful little book in 1973 called "The Book of Eve". Eve had a comfortable life in the well-to-do English neighborhood in Montreal, as a wife, and a mother of one grown son. On the day she received her first pension check, she walked out of that life to start a journey of personal growth and exploration. She made discoveries about herself, her husband, and her son along the way that shocked her, but she became self-sufficient and a stronger person. This is the kind of story that pulls you back into it again and again, so that, with each rereading,.

Constance Beresford-Howe. Constance Beresford-Howe. Meet Anne Graham, mother of two young children, young, attractive, heavily pregnant - and alone. At the age of 50, newly widowed Rowena Hill feels only relief to be free of her penny-pinching fusspot of a husband. As she makes her stumbling efforts to become fulfilled as a woman and a wage-earner, well-intentioned friends and her overbearing daughter all make plans for her future, with results that are sometimes comical, sometimes disastrous. Things have not worked out at all the way Anne intended. Her promising academic career was cut short by an unexpected pregnancy and an early marriage.

by Constance Beresford-Howe. When Eva Carroll walks out on her husband of 40 years, it is an unplanned, completely spontaneous gesture. Yet Eva feels neither guilt nor remorse

by Constance Beresford-Howe. Yet Eva feels neither guilt nor remorse. Instead, she feels rejuvenated and blissfully free. As she builds a new life for herself in a boarding house on the wrong side of Montreal, she finds happiness and independence – and, when she least expects it, love.

Read online books written by Constance Beresford-Howe in our e-reader absolutely for free. Books by Constance Beresford-Howe

Read online books written by Constance Beresford-Howe in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of The Marriage Bed at ReadAnyBook.

Title: The Book of Eve (2002). As she builds a new life for herself in a boarding house on the "wrong" side of Montreal, she finds happiness and independence - and, when she least expects it, love.

by Constance Beresford-Howe (Author). See all Product description.

Talk about The Book of Eve


Qwert
A book written many years ago which still resonates today.
Sadaron above the Gods
I am in Montreal and the story is set in Montreal, written by a friend of my mother's. It was a gift for my mother and she appreciated it.
Akirg
I am sorry to disagree with the other reviews of this book. I found
little substance in this story,let alone,enjoyment.
****SPOILERS***********
This was about a 60 something woman,in an abusive marriage
(he raped her,no love,etc,) which,she finds intolerable so...one day,she walks
away. She finds a small apartment where she sort of,"hides out" not only
observing the other tenants (passing judgement on them too) but,she rounds
out her meager living, finding things to sell to a pawn shop. Freedom indeed.

I read this through. The description sounded interesting but,i think this story was lacking.
The runaway female (Eva) does escape her loveless marriage but,she does not" live" life,
she just hides out and stagnates-only observing the world around her-the only world within
her reach. Eva does go back in her memory a lot and reflects on her past,explaining bits and
pieces to the reader but,there was nothing profound or lyrical about it-just some odd memories.

Fans of this author might like this but,i did not get anything from it. I would say,read it with an open
mind but,do not expect too much.
Usanner
Eve Carroll, a lady close to 70, walks out of an abusive, joyless marriage. Carrying very few items and very little money, she rents a basement room in a shabby home-and begins to live. She finds love too, with a younger man: but the story is definitely NOT about a gorgeous "cougar" and her cub. Neither of the lovers have much in the way of looks or money-they are simply two lonely but nice people in the same boat. A sweet, funny story about two average folks-and this is what made the book enjoyable for me. It is not a novel to read if you are looking for a deep plot or a torrid love story. But the characters are delightful, and the events in their relationship will make you smile.
Hamrl
I first discovered this 1973 novel around 1976 when I was a junior in high school. I was very impressed with the story of a 60-something woman (which was ANCIENT to me at the time!) who has spent 40 years in an unhappy marriage, with the husband now disabled, petulant, and demanding, and who one day sets down the tea tray, packs her hairbrush, and walks out without a word. At the time I found Eva an inspiring character, and the story was in a pseudo-journal style, which I enjoy.

In high school, I too was looking for ways out, not wanting to be doomed to family expectations, and Eva's story also seemed a cautionary tale about what could happen to someone who did not take charge of her own life sooner. Eva ends up impoverished, making ends meet by picking up items to sell at the pawn shop, yet feeling an enduring sense of freedom and gratitude. But I think her story made me less worried about becoming a "bag lady," one of the big fears of my generation, since Eva did quite well on her own with her small pension cheque, thank you, and the life of a poor old lady was, overall, better than her previous life of marital servitude.

When I reverently gave the novel to my aunt to read, she was less impressed. How could Eva just walk out on her marriage like that, when her husband needed her? Unfortunately, my Christian aunt's marriage broke up several years later, which goes to remind one that marital commitment is not always returned in kind anyway.

The premise of the novel stuck with me all these years, but for a long time I had the title wrong, so I couldn't find it again, and of course it was long out of print by the time I did. But once I had title and author, it wasn't long before I found a copy at a used bookstore (the Green Apple Annex in San Francisco, if you must know).

How does it play 30 years later? First, I found Eva a less inspiring character personally than before. The fact that she has recriminations about her actions does not excuse her selfishness in not communicating with her worried family. In fact, she is a judgmental and often disagreeable old lady herself, and the people who are able to get close to her do so in spite of herself. Yet she is intelligent and resourceful, qualities that had been suppressed in her life as wife and mother. However, all that "I'm so bad!" introspection without changing her behavior comes off as tedious now. The side characters come off as more interesting and complex, which Eva in her suburban snootiness is slow to appreciate, though eventually she does come around.

But there was a completely new and unexpected pleasure in Beresford-Howe's nature writing. She describes the changing of the harshly beautiful Montreal seasons in dazzling, radiant, and poetic detail. That was the kind of stuff I skimmed over in high school, but it is one of the pleasures of style that I could not appreciate when I was reading only for plot.

So, in appreciation for a novel that is layered enough to change with the age of the reader, and in gratitude that it wasn't a stinker after all these years of fond remembrance, five stars to ya, baby!
net rider
. breaking free
Reviewer:
Date: Feb3/044:56:25 PM
I first read this novel many years ago and was struck by what I felt was the honesty of the story. Eva physically walks out of her life one day but probably had been rehearsing this exit in her mind, over and over again.Only a woman who is curious enough to read this story could see the possibilty of leaving a long marriage, and could appreciate what was troubling and trapping Eva. Turning sixty-five was certainly a turning point for her and it just felt right for her to leave that particular day. SHe certainly discovers in her new life that money, status , and material goods won't bring happiness or fulfillment. In her new situation she can freely express her acceptance of human frailty . I was proud that she didn't go crawling home. The movie version was recently released in a in DVD with Claire Bloom as Eva. I highly recommend it.
Morlunn
Constance Beresford-Howe wrote a delightful little book in 1973 called "The Book of Eve". Eve had a comfortable life in the well-to-do English neighborhood in Montreal, as a wife, and a mother of one grown son. On the day she received her first pension check, she walked out of that life to start a journey of personal growth and exploration. She made discoveries about herself, her husband, and her son along the way that shocked her, but she became self-sufficient and a stronger person.
This is the kind of story that pulls you back into it again and again, so that, with each rereading, you see new aspects of Eve, her past life, and the life ahead of her.
Highly recommend