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Download Irrationality: An Essay on Akrasia, Self-Deception, and Self-Control ePub

by Alfred R. Mele

Download Irrationality: An Essay on Akrasia, Self-Deception, and Self-Control ePub
  • ISBN 0195043219
  • ISBN13 978-0195043211
  • Language English
  • Author Alfred R. Mele
  • Publisher Oxford University Press; 1st English Ed edition (June 18, 1987)
  • Pages 196
  • Formats lrf lit rtf mbr
  • Category Nutrition and Health
  • Subcategory Psychology and Counseling
  • Size ePub 1281 kb
  • Size Fb2 1614 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 500

Although much human action serves as proof that irrational behavior is remarkably common, certain forms of irrationality--most notably, incontinent action and self-deception--pose such difficult theoretical problems that philosophers have rejected them as logically or psychologically impossible. Here, Mele shows that, and how, incontinent action and self-deception are indeed possible. Drawing upon recent experimental work in the psychology of action and inference, he advances naturalized explanations of akratic action and self-deception while resolving the paradoxes around which the philosophical literature revolves. In addition, he defends an account of self-control, argues that "strict" akratic action is an insurmountable obstacle for traditional belief-desire models of action-explanation, and explains how a considerably modified model accommodates action of this sort.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed. I recommend the book to any serious work on self-deception, and most particularly to teachers.

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Irrationality: An essay on akrasia, self-deception, and self-control. Self-deception unmasked. Princeton University Press, 2001. Oxford University Press on Demand, 1992. Motivation and agency. Oxford University Press, 2003.

Self-deception poses longstanding and fascinating paradoxes. Philosophers have questioned whether, and how, self-deception is even possible; evolutionary theorists have debated whether it is adaptive. For Sigmund Freud self-deception was a fundamental key to understanding the unconscious, and from The Bible to The Great Gatsby literature abounds with characters renowned for their self-deception. The book, Autonomous Agents: From Self-Control to Autonomy (1995), by Alfred R. Mele, deals primarily with two main concepts, self-control and individual autonomy, and the relationship between them.

1 Donald Davidson, ‘Paradoxes of Irrationality,’ in Philosophical Essays on Freud, Richard Wollheim and James . The most impressive contribution from England is that of David Pears in his book Motivated Irrationality.

1 Donald Davidson, ‘Paradoxes of Irrationality,’ in Philosophical Essays on Freud, Richard Wollheim and James Hopkins, eds. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1984), 289-305, and David Pears, Motivated Irrationality (Oxford: Oxford University Press 1984). 2 George Ainslie, ‘Specious Reward’ in Psychological Bulletin 82 463-96; and ‘A Behavioral Economic Approach to the Defense Mechanisms’ in Social Science Information 21 735-80. In the United States, the work of Robert Audi is prominent in its analytical rigor and comprehensiveness.

Here, Mele shows that, and how, incontinent action and self-deception are indeed possible. Drawing upon recent experimental work in the psychology of action and inference, he advances naturalized explanations of akratic action and self-deception while resolving the paradoxes around which the philosophical literature revolves. Oxford University Press, 24 сент.

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Irrationality An Essay on Akrasia, Self Deception, and Self Control.

Introduction Mele (Ibid Mele, A. R. (1987). Irrationality: An essay on akrasia, self-deception, and self-control. New York: Oxford University Press.

The book, Autonomous Agents: From Self-Control to Autonomy (1995), by Alfred R. defines self-control as the opposite of the Aristotelian concept of akrasia, or the contrary of akrasia, which implies weakness of will, incontinence, or lack of self-control-the state of mind in which one acts against one’s better judgement.