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by Clark McCauley,Daniel Chirot

Download Why Not Kill Them All?: The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder ePub
  • ISBN 0691092966
  • ISBN13 978-0691092966
  • Language English
  • Author Clark McCauley,Daniel Chirot
  • Publisher Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (August 6, 2006)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats lrf rtf doc mbr
  • Category Nutrition and Health
  • Subcategory Psychology and Counseling
  • Size ePub 1606 kb
  • Size Fb2 1440 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 337

Genocide, mass murder, massacres. The words themselves are chilling, evoking images of the slaughter of countless innocents. What dark impulses lurk in our minds that even today can justify the eradication of thousands and even millions of unarmed human beings caught in the crossfire of political, cultural, or ethnic hostilities? This question lies at the heart of Why Not Kill Them All? Cowritten by historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark McCauley, the book goes beyond exploring the motives that have provided the psychological underpinnings for genocidal killings. It offers a historical and comparative context that adds up to a causal taxonomy of genocidal events.

Rather than suggesting that such horrors are the product of abnormal or criminal minds, the authors emphasize the normality of these horrors: killing by category has occurred on every continent and in every century. But genocide is much less common than the imbalance of power that makes it possible. Throughout history human societies have developed techniques aimed at limiting intergroup violence. Incorporating ethnographic, historical, and current political evidence, this book examines the mechanisms of constraint that human societies have employed to temper partisan passions and reduce carnage.

Might an understanding of these mechanisms lead the world of the twenty-first century away from mass murder? Why Not Kill Them All? makes clear that there are no simple solutions, but that progress is most likely to be made through a combination of international pressures, new institutions and laws, and education. If genocide is to become a grisly relic of the past, we must fully comprehend the complex history of violent conflict and the struggle between hatred and tolerance that is waged in the human heart.


Daniel Chirot and Clark McCauley, in their superbly written book, rhetorically ask why a dominant group with overwhelming power .

Daniel Chirot and Clark McCauley, in their superbly written book, rhetorically ask why a dominant group with overwhelming power would engage in genocide of its weaker rivals, and having established reasons for fratridcidal frenzies, they proceed to lay out measures that could prevent such human rights catastrophes. --Dipak Gupta, Political Science Quarterly. The greatest strength of Why Not Kill Them All? is its broad historical literacy, drawing examples from the Bible, eleventh-century England, czarist Russia, nineteenth-century United States, and well-known cases from the last century.

The authors, historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark McCauley, provide an insightful and wide-ranging analysis of both why mass murder occurs and why limited warfare is more common than genocide

The authors, historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark McCauley, provide an insightful and wide-ranging analysis of both why mass murder occurs and why limited warfare is more common than genocide. The difficulties of addressing prevention strategies are reflected in their attempt to provide Strategies to Decrease the Chances of Mass Political Murder in our Time in their concluding chapter. Critical case studies of particular events of mass political violence are invaluable; particularly, those that avoid the traps of hierarchies of victimization and bias.

Article in Political Science Quarterly 122(3):485-487 · September 2007 with 7 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. DOI: 1. 307/20202892.

The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder. by Daniel Chirot and Clark McCauley. Cowritten by historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark McCauley, the book goes beyond exploring the motives that have provided the psychological underpinnings for genocidal killings. It offers a historical and comparative context that adds up to a causal taxonomy of genocidal events.

Why Not Kill Them All? . Why Not Kill Them All?: The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder.

Why Not Kill Them All?: The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder. Daniel Chirot, Clark McCauley. Скачать (pdf, . 7 Mb).

Genocide, mass murder, massacres. The words themselves are chilling, evoking images of the slaughter of countless innocents. What dark impulses lurk in our minds that even today can justify the eradication of thousands and even millions of unarmed human beings caught in the crossfire of political, cultural, or ethnic hostilities? This question lies at the heart of Why Not Kill Them All? Cowritten by historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark McCauley, the book goes beyond exploring the motives that have provided the psychological underpinnings for genocidal killings.

Cowritten by historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark . The fourth chapter of the book which talked about the prevention of mass murder was far less resolute.

Cowritten by historical sociologist Daniel Chirot and psychologist Clark McCauley, the book goes beyond exploring the motives that have provided the psychological underpinnings for genocidal killings. The subtitle of this book is called "The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder. They proposed six strategies; three processes and two attitudes for each.

Library of Congress Call Number: HV6322. Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 30. /63 22. Personal Name: Chirot, Daniel. Publication, Distribution, et. Princeton, . Princeton University Press, (c)2006. ISBN: 9514108698 Author: Mikkeli, Heikki. Publication & Distribution: . Finnish Academy of Science and Letters, (c)1999. Philipp II. August, König von Frankreich.

Similarly, Clark McCauley's study of ethnic conflict and work as a psychology professor provide a necessary lens through which to view and analyze the prevention of mass murder. -Rachel Ray Steele, International Journal on World Peace, The greatest strength ofWhy Not Kill Them All'is its broad historical literacy, drawing examples from the Bible, eleventh-century England, czarist Russia, nineteenth-century United States, and well-known cases from the last century.

item 3 Chirot Daniel-Why Not Kill Them All Rev/E (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Chirot Daniel-Why Not Kill . This book addresses this question. It explores the motives that have provided the psychological underpinnings for genocidal killings.

item 3 Chirot Daniel-Why Not Kill Them All Rev/E (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Chirot Daniel-Why Not Kill Them All Rev/E (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW. £2. 1. Compare similar products. Why Not Kill Them All?: The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder by Clark R. McCauley, Daniel Chirot (Paperback, 2010).

Talk about Why Not Kill Them All?: The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder


Wild Python
This is a well-researched book: there are 30 pages of references, and the authors, Daniel Chirot and Clark McCauley, use them effectively.
Basically, Chirot and McCauley examine why genocide happens and suggest ways it can be prevented. They are very pessimistic: they rate the chances of more genocide in the future as likely, because the reasons genocide happens are still operative. One of their main points is the process they call "essentializing." They don't define it, so here's a dictionary definition: "essential: adj. 1) absolutely necessary; indispensable. 2)fundamental (essential principles). 3) of or constituting the essence of a person or thing. 4) (of an amino acid or a fatty acid) required by a living organism for normal growth, but not produced by the organism and therefore required in the diet. n. (esp. in pl.) a basic or indispensable element or thing. essentiality n. essentially adv."

also:"essentialism n. the belief that things have a set of characteristics which make them what they are, and that the task of science and philosophy is their discovery and expression. essentialist n. & adj."

So, I take that all to mean that Chirot and McCauley are using "essentializing" as meaning becoming prejudiced (against a particular group); ascribing particular, unflattering, qualities to all members of that group. "essentializing ...says that "they" are all alike and must be treated as a single entity." p. 206.
One of the authors, Chirot, went to Ivory Coast in April, 2003, and interviewed people about the conflict there between Northerners and Southerners. About the Northerners' views of Southerners, he says, "[I]t combines a mythologized history of the past full of resentment about various injustices with a demeaning, essentializing description of whole ethnic, religious, and regional groups who are deemed to be enemies. Needless to say, the southern view is the exact mirror image of the northern one." p. 204.

Interestingly enough, the authors found that "an ethnographic comparative study found that the higher the level of exchange between groups, whether in trade goods or intermarriage, the higher the incidence of war (Tefft and Reinhart 1974). So, increased contact doesn't prevent genocide. Familiarity breeds contempt; or envy: referring to Jews in Poland and Chinese in Malaysia and Indonesia, they say, "A minority doing better than the majority may be a particularly inflammable situation (Chua 2003). They do, however, maintain that learning about other cultures and ethnic groups will lessen the chances of genocide.
One reason for genocide, according to the authors, is the quest for purity. Referring to the Taiping Rebellion, Stalin, Hitler, and Pol Pot, they say, "Perfect purity imposed by force on a less than perfect world is an invitation to genocidal mass murder." p. 146

So what is the answer? Chirot and McCauley's major answer seems to be the ideals of the Enlightenment: "The modern world... has been retribalized, but on a larger scale than before. This is why the Enlightenment's glorification of the individual and individual rights is more important than ever, and necessary to restrain genocidal impulses." p. 142.
"To combat [essentializing] requires a special ideology that has become widespread only in political cultures suffused with Enlightenment values. That ideology recognizes that individuals are in a real sense more important than communities. Not only do individuals have rights, but they are to be judged as individuals responsible for their actions, not as members of any group. As human beings find it easy to essentialize groups, to lump individuals into communities, and to judge the group as a whole, making individual distinctions in difficult times of inter-communal competition is a rare accomplishment." p. 206.
John Weiss, in his 1996 book, Ideology of Death: Why the Holocaust Happened in Germany, explores the idea that Germany was not affected by the Enlightenment to nearly the extent that France and Britain were, by the 1930's, and claims that's a major reason why the Holocaust happened in Germany. Chirot and McCauley cite his book as a reference.Ideology of Death: Why the Holocaust Happened in Germany
The authors say "If ...some.. skepticism and willingness to question and test received facts were to become more widespread, there would be fewer intellectual and political leaders wedded to communal myths about "our" purity and perfectly just cause. Some leaders who can balance the need to mobilize support for just causes while avoiding deadly essentializing of enemies occasionally do emerge, and we tend to remember the most famous ones as exceptional heroes. The Abraham Lincolns, Jawaharlal Nehrus, and Nelson Mandelas of this world are rare. But educating substantial numbers of young potential elites about history in this manner would certainly increase the likelihood that there will be more, and at many different levels of leadership. It may seem utopian to even mention such a long-term project, but that, after all, is one of the functions of higher education. In a world that seems to be going in the opposite direction, that is something worth considering." p 210.
Keath
This book tells us plenty about mass murder.

Of course, as the authors say, there are plenty of reasons not to "kill them all." Namely, they are like us. And, I might add that what goes around can come around.

But there are instances of mass murder as well as smaller incidents that have the same sorts of causes. We see how fear and other elements can lead to a desire to murder. We see that many soldiers in wartime can express a desire to kill enemy civilians as a matter of policy. We see how people can overcome their rather natural antipathy towards working as slaughterers. We see that many people can show a willingness to kill someone who merely makes them angry (as long as they only need to push a button or turn a knob to do it and feel that they have the authority to do so). We see the sort of propaganda that can be used to demean and dehumanize those who are intended victims.

It is clear that all sorts of people can support mass murder, out of some sort of rather basic instincts, even if they do not think of themselves as having any special overall loyalties or prejudices. One can use one's ability to reason to find excuses for one's behavior rather than to take some other course of action. And it is very common for people to refuse to even consider changing their stances on the basis of facts or logic.

Well, how does one oppose such behavior?

Chirot and McCauley have some comments on this, but they are not wildly hopeful. And I tend to agree, even though mass murder is counterproductive and unnecessary. Any group that has the ability to commit mass murder can almost always do something less extreme that has lesser long-term negative consequences for both sides. But will intelligent people agree to take facts and logic seriously? The authors imply that many won't do so and that they'll have to be restrained by outsiders. My reaction is that outsiders may be unreasonable as well: we've seen mass murders in the last couple of decades in spite of the purported attempts of "outsiders" to stop them.

I think this book is interesting, and I recommend it.