derrierloisirs.fr
» » Woman the Hunter

Download Woman the Hunter ePub

by Mary Zeiss Stange

Download Woman the Hunter ePub
  • ISBN 0807046469
  • ISBN13 978-0807046463
  • Language English
  • Author Mary Zeiss Stange
  • Publisher Beacon Press; First Printing edition (1997)
  • Formats azw rtf lrf txt
  • Category Outdoor Sports
  • Subcategory Hunting and Fishing
  • Size ePub 1373 kb
  • Size Fb2 1715 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 413


What Mary Zeiss Stange erects in their place-woman who don't shirk from participating in nature's cycles of life and .

What Mary Zeiss Stange erects in their place-woman who don't shirk from participating in nature's cycles of life and death-is surely one of the saner paths toward a healthier earth. - Ted Kerasote, author of Bloodties: Nature, Culture, and the Hunt. Exploring how women and men relate to nature and violence, Mary Zeiss Stange demonstrates how false assumptions about women and about hunting permeate contemporary thinking.

Mary Zeiss Stange is Associate Professor of Religion and Women's Studies at Skidmore College and author of Woman the Hunter. This item: Gun Women: Firearms and Feminism in Contemporary America (Fast Track Books). Customers who bought this item also bought.

by. Stange, Mary Zeiss. ark:/13960/t8jf18g9r.

By bringing Woman the Hunter back into the spotlight, therefore, Stange upsets basic assumptions across the political and intellectual spectrum

By bringing Woman the Hunter back into the spotlight, therefore, Stange upsets basic assumptions across the political and intellectual spectrum. Woman the Hunter also challenges the notion that human beings - male or female - are separate from nature, an idea reflected in the environmentalist impulse to keep wilderness safe from people.

Woman the Hunter book. Exploring how women and men relate to nature and violence, Mary Zeiss Stange demonstrates how false assumptions about women and about hunting permeate contemporary thought

Woman the Hunter book. Over two million American women hunt. By taking up weapons for the. Exploring how women and men relate to nature and violence, Mary Zeiss Stange demonstrates how false assumptions about women and about hunting permeate contemporary thought. Her book is a profound critique of our society's evasion of issues that make us uncomfortable, and it culminates in a surprising claim: that only by appreciating the value of hunting can we come to understand what it means to be human. Carol K. Oyster is Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse and author of Groups: A User's Guide. Библиографические данные. Gun Women: Firearms and Feminism in Contemporary America. Mary Zeiss Stange, Carol K. Oyster.

One caveat: Stange's hypocritical stereotyping of men as macho males threatened by women hunters is troubling, considering many-herself included- -were introduced to the sport by fathers and husbands. Mixing autobiographical reflection and scholarly analysis, a woman hunter examines the cultural history of hunting, brilliantly challenging fundamental assumptions about femininity, masculinity, and the relation of humans to the natural world.

We are not that far removed from the time when we were all hunters, and Mary Zeiss Stange understands that better than most

We are not that far removed from the time when we were all hunters, and Mary Zeiss Stange understands that better than most. How refreshing to read a book on hunting by a feminist! Too often we hear "Men are hunters and women are gatherers. This book shows how the hunting spirit lies within us al. tange is an observant hunter and a skilled writer.

Электронная книга "Gun Women: Firearms and Feminism in Contemporary America", Mary Zeiss Stange, Carol K. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Gun Women: Firearms and Feminism in Contemporary America" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Talk about Woman the Hunter


Binar
Over a decade later, it's nice to reflect how far culture has come since this book has come out. More and more women are interested in producing their own food and preserving food traditions. Because of that, they are having to confront death and the realities of the human place in the ecosystem. I am glad Mary paved the way for women not afraid of this.

Many women I know are farmer-activists and some have received positive press in The New York Times and other media outlets. Slaughter, hunting, and butchering workshops led by them are selling out in places like New York City. Most people are positive and joyful about these- happy to engage with their food and to not be dependent on industrial monocultures.

The post-vegan feminist culture has come to the fore. When I lead butchering workshops, many of the attendees are women who formerly subscribed to the vegan ecofeminist paradigm. Most have abandoned it because of their health suffering, but others have told me that that after volunteering on farms or at nature preserves they simply couldn't subscribe to a philosophy so alienated from nature. I often recommend this book and Lierre Keith's The Vegetarian Myth in their journey to heal their bodies and embrace humanity's econiche.

Thank you Mary for providing this resource for celebrating the joys of hunting and our place in the universe.
Use_Death
great read which combines feminist theory, ecological theory and a critique of ecofeminism and radical feminism. To my mind, it is very postfeminist although it doesn't use this term. A wonderful mythological perspective, a great view of hunting and ecological theory and altogether a lucid and intriguing book making us take a new look at gender stereotyping and gender roles as well as hunting. I read it because I am interested in female werewolves and hunting instincts and here is a great discussion of our ideas (stereotypes) of Man the Hunter and Woman the Gatherer.
Halloween
Whether individual men, women, academics, or feminists like the fact,human beings are predators. Whether we stalk our own food or allow others to provide it for us is an issue that is one of the focal points of the controversy surrounding the sport and psychology of hunting. Currently there is virtually no scientifically credible psychological research on the reasons why people continue to hunt. Certainly polemics are readily available from animal rights activists and others who fail to take into consideration that wearing leather, eating meat raised for the purpose of food, or maintaing a vegan diet which ultimately results in more animals losing their lives through the destruction of their own natural hunting grounds to human cultivation of edible plants, are actions not necessarily on a higher, simply a different, moral plane. To eschew any form of hunting would so entirely eliminate sources of food and clothing (for to take the argument that humans should not use animals as a source of food to its logical conclusion would also require the position that animals are not superior to plants, thus plants should also should not suffer from exploitation) that it would require that critics make their comments sitting naked at the computer. The reality is that the largest growing group of hunters is women. In the anecdotes Stange employs to introduce each chapter, nonhunters who are willing to keep an open mind are introduced to the powerful emotional and bonding aspects (among hunters) of the hunt, as well as the importance of the strong ethical principles and discipline required of hunters. This book is an honest, rigorous investigation of the various myths which have been employed to maintain the image of women as somehow purer and morally superior to men in the feeding of their families, and takes an important look at the lengths to which ideologies will go to interpret ancient evidence through the more ideologically convenient lens of 20th century stereotypes. A truly excellent book.
Invissibale
For years, hunting has been on a steady decline in this country - less than 3% of Americans engage in this controversial blood sport. Much of the shift towards our culture's condemnation of hunting can be attributed to the efforts of animal interest groups, as well as numerous scientific studies that clearly indicate a compelling link between cruelty to animals and interpersonal violence.
Recent pyschiatric studies have shown a particularly disturbing connection between hunting and rape. That makes Ms. Stange's thesis rather curious: "Woman the Hunter" seeks to explain, and even promote, a rare phenomena - the female hunter as the ultimate feminist.
Although it is certainly an interesting perspective, Ms. Stange's arguments are generally unconvincing, primarily because many of those opposed to hunting (and animal abuse in general) are feminists, as well as civil rights activists, such as the writer Alice Walker ("The Color Purple"). In fact, there seems to be a growing literary trend among academics toward the exploration of man's treatment of women and minorities as compared to his treatment of animals. Readers interested in a provocative treatment of this topic should refer to Marjorie Spiegel's "The Dreaded Comparison," which provides a truly chilling look at the similarities between slavery and man's treatment of animals.
In that book's forward, Ms. Walker observed, "The animals of the world exist for their own reasons. They were not made for humans any more than black people were made for whites or women for men."
Although not particularly comforting, this point of view seems far more relevant to the current social issues between men and woman, and "whites" and "non-whites," than Ms. Stange's indulgent, "I-am-Woman-see-me-kill" premise.