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Download Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection ePub

by George Black

Download Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection ePub
  • ISBN 1400063965
  • ISBN13 978-1400063963
  • Language English
  • Author George Black
  • Publisher Random House; First Edition edition (August 8, 2006)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats rtf docx mbr lit
  • Category Outdoor Sports
  • Subcategory Miscellaneous
  • Size ePub 1661 kb
  • Size Fb2 1953 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 119

Thirty-five million Americans–one in eight–like to go fishing. Fly fishers have always considered themselves the aristocracy of the sport, and a small number of those devotees, a few thousand at most, insist upon using one device in the pursuit of their obsession: a handcrafted split-bamboo fly rod. Meeting this demand for perfection are the inheritors of a splendid art, one that reveres tradition while flouting obvious economic sense and reaches back through time to touch the hands of such figures as Theodore Roosevelt and Henry David Thoreau.In Casting a Spell, George Black introduces readers to rapt artisans and the ultimate talismans of their uncompromising fascination: handmade bamboo fly rods. But this narrative is more than a story of obscure objects of desire. It opens a new vista onto a century and a half of modern American cultural history. With bold strokes and deft touches, Black explains how the ingenuity of craftsmen created a singular implement of leisure–and how geopolitics, economics, technology, and outrageous twists of fortune have all come to focus on the exquisitely crafted bamboo rod. We discover that the pastime of fly-fishing intersects with a mind-boggling variety of cultural trends, including conspicuous consumption, environmentalism, industrialization, and even cold war diplomacy. Black takes us around the world, from the hidden trout streams of western Maine to a remote valley in Guangdong Province, China, where grows the singular species of bamboo known as tea stick–the very stuff of a superior fly rod. He introduces us to the men who created the tools and techniques for crafting exceptional rods and those who continue to carry the torch in the pursuit of the sublime. Never far from the surface are such overarching themes as the tension between mass production and individual excellence, and the evolving ways American society has defined, experienced, and expressed its relationship to the land.Fly-fishing may seem a rarefied pursuit, and making fly rods might be a quixotic occupation, but this rich, fascinating narrative exposes the soul of an authentic part of America, and the great significance of little things. George Black’s latest expedition into a hidden corner of our culture is an utterly enchanting, illuminating, and enlightening experience.

Black celebrates the bamboo fly rod, finding in this special piece of fishing tackle a metaphor for an offshoot of the American dream: what he calls the "pursuit of perfection" in craftsmanship.

Black celebrates the bamboo fly rod, finding in this special piece of fishing tackle a metaphor for an offshoot of the American dream: what he calls the "pursuit of perfection" in craftsmanship. The text combines a history of bamboo rod development-from -nineteenth-century craftsmen through such recent rod makers as Hoagy Carmichael Jr. (son of the songwriter)-with a broader narrative in which bamboo craftsmanship becomes part of a larger story involving the cold war, the growth of outdoor retailing companies (Abercrombie and Fitch, Orvis, L. L. Bean), and the movement of the.

Casting a Spell book Black examines the discipline of bamboo rod making by examining its artisan’s common dedication to that golden thread of th. .

Casting a Spell book. Thirty-five million Americans–one in eight–like to go fishing  . Fly-fishing may seem a rarefied pursuit, and making fly rods might be a quixotic occupation, but this rich, fascinating narrative exposes the soul of an authentic part of America, and the great significance of little things. Black examines the discipline of bamboo rod making by examining its artisan’s common dedication to that golden thread of the quest for perfection and their oft times difficult lives because of this dedication.

Thirty-five million Americans–one in eight–like to go fishing. The art of the bamboo fly rod 'casts a spell' on George Black.

George Black has written a most literary and enjoyable history of the bamboo fly fishing rod. Unhurried, with frequent fascinating digressions, he takes one through the history of the development of this remarkable sporting instrument, beginning in the mid 1800's and coming down to the present. And as a professional writer he has the gift of words to explain just how it does.

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In Casting a Spell, George Black introduces readers to rapt artisans and the ultimate talismans of their uncompromising .

In Casting a Spell, George Black introduces readers to rapt artisans and the ultimate talismans of their uncompromising fascination: handmade bamboo fly rods. But this narrative is more than a story of obscure objects of desire. It opens a new vista onto a century and a half of modern American cultural history.

The "heyday" of bamboo fly rod production and use was an approximately 75-year period from the 1870-s to the 1950s when fiberglass became . Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection.

The "heyday" of bamboo fly rod production and use was an approximately 75-year period from the 1870-s to the 1950s when fiberglass became the predominant material for fly rods  .

Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection: ISBN 9781400063963 .

Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection: ISBN 9781400063963 (978-1-4000-6396-3) Hardcover, Random House, 2006. Chris C. Maletis, Petitioner, v. United States of America. Supreme Court Transcript of Record with Supporting Pleadings. Guatemala: The Making of a Revolution.

Nicely written and an interesting historical look at the demise of American craftsmanship as seen through the .

Nicely written and an interesting historical look at the demise of American craftsmanship as seen through the lens of America's Bamboo Fly Rod builders. My personal take is that he overplays Edwards' influence somewhat, yet that's a forgivable offense given the Edwards rod brand is at the center of story.

Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection, Random House (New .

Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection, Random House (New York, NY), 2006. SIDELIGHTS: Journalist George Black has published three books on international issues, one each on the prodemocracy movement in China, . involvement in Central America, and the attempted genocide of the Kurds in Iraq. Additionally, Black has published two titles related to his love of fly fishing: The Trout Pool Paradox: The American Lives of Three Rivers and Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection.

Talk about Casting a Spell: The Bamboo Fly Rod and the American Pursuit of Perfection


Manona
A book review can be a powerful stimulus in encouraging or discouraging potential readers, assuming it isn’t first discarded based defects in writing or attitude. After reading a book, I will often reread reviews, sometimes questioning how certain impressions were stumbled upon. I’ve read Casting a Spell twice and regard it as an important contribution to the literature on American bamboo rod history. The first read was largely void of my understanding of the author’s intent to incorporate so much additional historical information; the second read was undertaken precisely because that incorporation, later realized, was crucial to the author’s fuller purpose. I would recommend the potential reader pay close attention to the balanced and thoughtful reviews by Iron Blue, Bristol, NewUtahCaneAngler, Shultz, Tacul, Knapp, hans and Matlock. Siding with these reviewers and clarifying certain points a little more, let me suggest first what the book is not, then what the book is; perhaps this will better assist future readers. The book should not be underrated based on an ill-fit to the Kindle format. My access was in text format, but if Kindle somehow diminishes the reading experience, and this is regrettable, then stick to the hard-bound version. Second, the book is not an academic text or broad survey of bamboo rod making, rod repair, anthology of historical rod makers, or survey of the evolution of the bamboo rod across the decades. Third, although I agree that the five or so comments about the author’s liberal leanings constitute a questionable and unnecessary aside, the book is not a political diatribe, rant, ego-boost, or an indulgence by an elitist, privileged or arrogant character. Quite the contrary, the author, bearing an established reputation and undoubtedly granted access to historical elements others would have been denied, is humbled by the lore and richness of the American bamboo rod, the persistence shown by its craftsmen against the undermining forces endemic in the American economic structure, and several times discloses not having the financial means to acquire some of the rods he so dearly covets. Finally, it is not a book for those seeking to discover another Gierach in hiding, since nobody has ever successfully imitated the original. Now, for what the book is: First, the book is a great read since the author is a tremendous writer, meticulously descriptive, and able to capture and drive the reader’s attention. Second, the book centralizes, then expands upon, a select number of “H. L. Leonard” and “post-Leonard” rod makers, with keen attention paid to one E. W. Edwards, out of deep admiration and for purposes the author makes clear. Third, while the central tale of the book is bamboo rod making as a boutique industry engineered by small number of diverse and highly skilled craftsmen, the larger emphasis of the book focuses on the varied contextual forces within which the American bamboo rod industry has evolved, struggled with, and in select instances, has caused ruin. Such factors, and this is an incomplete listing, include the impact of America’s emerging leisure class and the role of “sporting goods” industry, the curbing influence of American consumerism, craftsmanship versus corporate profiteering, and the pitting of individual talent and genius against forces that inevitably conspire to threaten their extinction. And last, though inadequately described in previous reviews, the book is a highly personal account by a writer who, in middle age, comes to embrace the world of fine bamboo rods and, as if making up for lost time, begins piecing together part of its history, all the while driven by a sense that the trail, and its evidence, may be lost to time unless gathered up quickly. This is biography at its most personal, where the author literally climbs into his own vehicle and travels about interviewing family members and rod making descendants of the early masters, uncovers family memorabilia and archival data, personally visits the street locations of early bamboo rod storefronts, all the while, in story form, enumerating the many and varied contextual forces that bore down upon the early rod makers as they struggled to make a go of it. Part historical tale, part biographical sketches, part travel adventure, and part critique upon the clash between specialized craftsmen and American commercial implications. A terrific book, give it a read!
Quellik
My review will likely be biased as I own a Sweetgrass rod and have a family connection to an Edwards Quadrate. Black does a great job of presenting a great amount of detail on the life cycle of a few well known rod companies, and rodmakers, many of whom have left our mortal world and more than a few who are still making wonderful rods today. He has pieced together the interrelationships of these masters and the companies for whom they worked while providing insight as to what drives these masters to make excellent fishing rods in the manner in which, and in some cases, using tools which were used more than 100 years ago. This book fills in many holes left by, or topics covered in much less detail than other books on some of the older makers, while connecting their craft to modern makers. I could not provide a higher Recommendation! This book does not go into any detail in identifying particular rods.
Arith
The topic has started to catch my eye when I treat myself to a book on amazon. Bamboo rods really have a grasp on my interest in the sport right now. So, I bought this book with the intention of trying to further my awareness of these rods. Well, let me just say that the writing is great. It is unsurpassed within the world of fly fishing literature. However, the author's elitist attitudes did not really provide much of an insight into the world of bamboo rods, other than to recount how one person was able to use his credentials to make connections that others could not make. He met some great people and tells us of these meetings. Then the author engages in an ego boosting yarn about his rare and valuable rods he owns. That is about all that is in the book and why it does not really belong their with Gierach's book. It is up to you but there are other more enjoyable books on the subject.
Lbe
I thought this book was about fly fishing. It's not! It's about rods and reels and how to make them, I think. I took a quick look inside when I bought it a long time ago. It now sits on a bookshelf and I'm thinking about donating it to the library. Not the book's fault. Be sure you know what you're buying. :-)
Visonima
George Black has written a most literary and enjoyable history of the bamboo fly fishing rod. Unhurried, with frequent fascinating digressions, he takes one through the history of the development of this remarkable sporting instrument, beginning in the mid 1800's and coming down to the present. He provides much color to persons whose names were all we knew before: Leanard, Edwards, Hawes, Thomas and more. A grand book by a great author. You will really enjoy this book, even if you are not a fly fisher.
Bad Sunny
Incredibly informative and researched! Learned a great deal about the complexities and history of bamboo fly rod making. Love bamboo rods and more fully the time and demands of crafing these superb rods!
Mr_Mix
I actually bought this to replace a copy I had passed on to a friend. Wanted to reread it! Stunningly researched and written.
A must read for those with a romance for classic bamboo rods.