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by Claudia Swan

Download Art, Science, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Holland: Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) (Studies in Netherlandish Visual Culture) ePub
  • ISBN 0521826748
  • ISBN13 978-0521826747
  • Language English
  • Author Claudia Swan
  • Publisher Cambridge University Press (July 18, 2005)
  • Pages 272
  • Formats docx mbr txt mobi
  • Category Photography
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1192 kb
  • Size Fb2 1949 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 471

Art, Science, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Holland is the first sustained study to offer an account of the rise of scientific naturalism in Dutch art and the simultaneous interest in fantastic imagery, representations of witches in particular. Claudia Swan uses the work of artist Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of the human imagination and artistic theories of creation. This book is the first to examine De Gheyn's work in the context of cultural history and image theory.

Claudia Swan uses the work of Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of artistic theories o. .

Claudia Swan uses the work of Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of artistic theories of creation. Series: Studies in Netherlandish Visual Culture.

De Gheyn (1565–1629), styled "the second" to distinguish him from his father and . In early modern race studies, two recurrent and related issues have preoccupied literary historians.

De Gheyn (1565–1629), styled "the second" to distinguish him from his father and son who had the same name, was born in Antwerp. In 1585, at the age of twenty, he settled in Haarlem, where Hendrick Goltzius instructed him in the art of engraving. Between 1590 and 1595 he lived in Amsterdam. In the second part of her book, she shifts to De Gheyn's witches, and in the final chapter she proposes a balanced judgment on the degree to which the artist aimed at rendering a realistic image in the two genres he pursued. I find Swan's analysis very convincing.

Claudia Swan uses the work of artist Jacques de Gheyn II () to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of the human imagination and artistic theories of creation

Claudia Swan uses the work of artist Jacques de Gheyn II () to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of the human imagination and artistic theories of creation. This book is the first to examine De Gheyn's work in the context of cultural history and image theory.

In her book on Jacques (or Jacob) de Gheyn II, Claudia Swan helps close this trans-Alpine gap, and to usher de.

In her book on Jacques (or Jacob) de Gheyn II, Claudia Swan helps close this trans-Alpine gap, and to usher de Gheyn scholarship into the new millennium. Swan's stated purpose in the book is to elide the perceived boundaries between early modern theories of science and those of imaginative image-making with the art of Jacob de Gheyn as her case study.

Claudia Swan uses the work of artist Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of the human.

Claudia Swan uses the work of artist Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) to explore the reciprocity between visual representation and early modern descriptive science, and of the parallel demonological theories of the human imagination and artistic theories of creation. This book is the first to examine De Gheyn's work in the context of cultural history and image theory By Claudia Swan.

Jacques de Gheyn II (15651629) (Studies in Netherlandish Visual Culture)

Art, Science, and Witchcraft in Early Modern Holland. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Jacques de Gheyn II (15651629) (Studies in Netherlandish Visual Culture). Published July 18, 2005 by Cambridge University Press. JACQUES DE GHEYN II - SON OF JACQUES DE GHEYN I (1537/8-81) and father of Jacques de Gheyn III (1596-1641) - was born in Antwerp in 1565 and died sixty-four years later in The Hague.

Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft. In: Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft. 2008 ; Vol. 3. pp. 230-232. cle{483758b4d525, title "Boekbespreking ", author "{de Waardt}, .

Varying Form of Title: Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629). xvii, 254 . 8 p. of plates : ill. (some co. ;, 26 cm. Title: Cambridge studies in Netherlandish visual culture. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-246) and index. Personal Name: Gheyn, Jacob de, 1565-1629 Criticism and interpretation. Rubrics: Naturalism in art Netherlands Witchcraft in art. Download now Art, science, and witchcraft in early modern Holland : Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) Claudia Swan. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

published by. University of Pennsylvania Press.

Claudia Swan, Northwestern University, Art History Department .

Claudia Swan, Northwestern University, Art History Department, Faculty Member. Studies Art History, History of Science, and Historiography (in Art History). Art, Science and Witchcraft in Early Modern Holland: Jacques de Gheyn II (1565-1629) more. Cultural changes gradually allowed individual eyewitness perception, rather than traditional or expert transmission alone, to be considered valid.

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