derrierloisirs.fr
» » Anonymous Was a Woman: A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It

Download Anonymous Was a Woman: A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It ePub

by Phyllis Rose,Mirra Bank

Download Anonymous Was a Woman: A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It ePub
  • ISBN 0312134304
  • ISBN13 978-0312134303
  • Language English
  • Author Phyllis Rose,Mirra Bank
  • Publisher St. Martin's Griffin; 1st THUS edition (September 15, 1995)
  • Pages 128
  • Formats mbr docx lrf lrf
  • Category Photography
  • Subcategory History and Criticism
  • Size ePub 1117 kb
  • Size Fb2 1679 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 420

In print since it was first published in 1979, this book is a glorious collection of American folk art by "ordinary" women of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Filled with beautiful four-color reproductions of samplers, quilts, paintings, and needle-pictures along with excerpts from diaries and letters, sampler verse, books, and magazines of the period, Anonymous Was a Woman celebrates the daily experiences and inner lives of women who, in acts of love and duty, created many masterpieces of American folk art.

Mirra Bank is a filmmaker who lives in New York City. This is a charming book about women in the 1800's. It is delightful, unpressured reading.

Mirra Bank is a filmmaker who lives in New York City. Her other award-winning films include Enormous Changes at the Last Minute, Spirit to Spirit: Nikki Giovanni, and Nobody's Girls. I would not recommend it for men.

Anonymous Was a Woman book. In print since it was first published in 1979, this book is a glorious collection of American folk art by "ordinary" women of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Anonymous Was a Woman: A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It.

Anonymous Was a Woman: A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1979, p. 56. Lexington, Museum of Our National Heritage. Reflections of 19th Century America: Folk Art From the Collection of Sybil and Arthur Kern. September 19, 1979 – June 15, 1980. Lipman, Jean, Elizabeth V. Warren and Robert Bishop. Young America: A Folk-Art History. New York: Hudson Hills Press in association with the Museum of American Folk Art, 1986, p. 23.

Anonymous Was a Woman : A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It. by Mirra Bank. Based on her acclaimed PBS film of the same name, Anonymous Was a Woman is a glorious collection of American folk art, created by ordinary women o f the 18th and 19th centuries, which celebrates the daily experiences and inner lives of women. 97 illustrations, 60 in color. edu/ Retrieved 15 April 2015. Richmond, Virginia Museum. American Folk Painting: Selections from the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. William E. Wiltshire III.

The stories of these women who changed history are full of adventures . There is a saying that behind every successful man is a strong woman

The stories of these women who changed history are full of adventures, ups, and downs, losses, and triumphs. There is a saying that behind every successful man is a strong woman. Well, none of these great women stood behind their husbands but rather alongside them, moreover in some cases, in front of them. She came of a distinguished New York family and was educated at home and in Europe by private tutors and governesses. November 29, 1977 – January 8, 1978, p. 66. ^ Wunderlich, Rudolf G. "American Naive and Folk Art of the Nineteenth Century. Kennedy Quarterly vol. 13, no. 1 (January 1974): 57. ^ Richmond, Virginia Museum, 1977, p.

Talk about Anonymous Was a Woman: A Celebration in Words and Images of Traditional American Art and the Women Who Made It


Bradeya
This book is deceptively simple on first glance, having reproductions of women's works in fiber and watercolor, and quotations from their diaries, letters, poems and other writings. It can be devoured in one sitting. However the reading and the viewing of the art examples provide deep insight into the daily life of average and notable women in the 18th and 19th centuries. This book was first published in the 1970s, and began a renewed appreciation of the creative accomplishments of women despite the restrictions placed on their gender, and the limited educational opportunities available.
Dyni
Love the collected quotes from women who created quilts simply to tell their story, never expecting they'd ever be seen by any eyes but their family's. These women were the quiet, humble, unknown she-roes of our history.
Fonceiah
Very interesting information. It had a picture of a quilt I was trying to find and a little about it which was fun.
Justie
Quilt historians and lovers of needlework will like this book. I bought it to take to a quilt retreat and we took turns reading some of the stories out loud. Some were sweet, some funny, others poignant. The pictures are fun to look at.
Alister
I love this book! As a needle woman myself, the accounts of other such women were dear to my heart. I gave it to my mother who taught me to sew and embroider and was sorry my grandmother who taught my mother was no longer living to share it with her. I particularly liked how the book divided the stages of the early women's lives and connected the stitcheries with journal entries. Some of the quotations are expressions of my own feelings. Anyone who uses a needle would find this a gem.
Jonide
This is a charming book about women in the 1800's. It is delightful, unpressured reading. I would not recommend it for men.
riki
I have this book already and purchased it for a gift. I have no idea as yet if it is a success. I certainly love it.
I bought this book long ago, still have it and decided to send it to friends after we saw a textile exhibit together.