derrierloisirs.fr
» » Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City

Download Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City ePub

by Richard Cahan,Michael Williams

Download Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City ePub
  • ISBN 0978545028
  • ISBN13 978-0978545024
  • Language English
  • Author Richard Cahan,Michael Williams
  • Publisher CityFiles Press (October 1, 2008)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats lit azw txt mobi
  • Category Photography
  • Subcategory Photography and Video
  • Size ePub 1920 kb
  • Size Fb2 1517 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 540

Richard Nickel is an urban legend of sorts. He is remembered for his brave and lonely stand to protect Chicago's great architecture, and for his dramatic death in the rubble of the Stock Exchange Building. He is remembered, too, for the photographs he left behind. This is a book about one man's relationship with his city, a remarkably personal story told through compelling photographs. Richard Nickel's Chicago is for people who love the city, and for people all over the world who value city life.

Richard Cahan is the author of They All Fall Down, the life story of photographer Richard Nickel. Exceptionally rare and beautiful photographs of a city I hadn't known. Making this book even more special was the inspirational and moving story of Richard Nickel.

Richard Cahan is the author of They All Fall Down, the life story of photographer Richard Nickel. He and co-author Michael Williams have written six books together, including Who We Were: A Snapshot History of America. They both live in Chicago.

Richard Stanley Nickel (May 31, 1928 – April 13, 1972) was a Polish American architectural photographer and historical preservationist, who was based in Chicago, Illinois. He is best known for his efforts to preserve and document the buildings of architect Louis Sullivan, and the work of the architecture firm of Adler & Sullivan. Richard Nickel was born in the Chicago neighborhood of Humboldt Park in a two-flat located at 4327 W. Haddon

Richard Nickel's Chicago book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Richard Nickel's Chicago book. Richard Nickel is an urban legend of sorts.

Items related to Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost. Home Cahan, Richard; Williams, Michael Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City. He is remembered for his brave and lonely stand to protect Chicago's great architecture, and for his dramatic death in the rubble of the Stock Exchange Building. He is remembered, too, for the photographs he left behind. This is a book about one man's relationship with his city, a remarkably personal story told through compelling photographs. Richard Nickel's Chicago is for people who love the city, and for people all over the world who value city life. Start by marking Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City as Want to Read

Richard Nickel's Chicago book.

Richard Nickel is an urban legend of sorts

One man did: Architecture photographer Richard Nickel spent years with his camera, documenting - and arguing .

One man did: Architecture photographer Richard Nickel spent years with his camera, documenting - and arguing against - the demolition of buildings in Chicago. Thirty-five years ago this month, Nickel died trying to document the demise of a building designed by Louis Sullivan, whose architecture helped define the Chicago cityscape. It's like watching a train," Cahan says.

Williams, MichaelNickel, Richard,Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs Of A Lost City. Chicago : Cityfiles Press, 2006. These citations may not conform precisely to your selected citation style. Please use this display as a guideline and modify as needed.

Michael Williams and Richard Cahan write award-winning photography books. They are co-authors of Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City. Nicholas Osborn is the founder of SquareAmerica. All three live in Chicago.

Talk about Richard Nickel's Chicago: Photographs of a Lost City


Wanenai
Very pleased with this book, which has been on my "Wanted List" for a while... I was hoping for perhaps, a few more photos that were taken of lost residential housing, but instead, enjoyed some of his candid "People Photography" portraying that Era... As a Chicagoan, who like Nickel, has been sickened by the "lack of respect for our rich architectural heritage"... I appreciate the efforts that Nickels made to call attention to and record, the destruction of the beauty. "Books KC", a Missouri based bookseller, delivered this book quickly for a decent price and in a condition that exceeded my expectations!
Urreur
This volume is an absolute must have for any aspiring (or professional) historian of the Chicago architectural movement. Just to be able to see what the city looked like long ago, was worth the view provided by this picturesque compilation. Kudos to Mr. Nickel for preserving for us and future generations, what was the folly of the Father Daley's administration: misunderstanding and disrespect for the value of architecture.
Tansino
Equally beautiful and heart-breaking. These pages capture some really stunning photographs of Chicago architecture that are so easily forgotten among the steel and concrete that is Chicago now. Definitely important for young generations to get to see. I've always loved Chicago architecture and still maintain that Chicago has one of the best skylines in the world but it was lovely to see a different side.
Alexandra
Amazing book full of "lost" houses or buildings from the "old" Chicago, and the quality of the b&w pics is excellent.
Cordantrius
Great addition to my library. Exceptionally rare and beautiful photographs of a city I hadn't known. Making this book even more special was the inspirational and moving story of Richard Nickel. Would highly recommend!
snowball
Good book but not quite what I had hoped for .
Forcestalker
Richard Nickel was a talented photographer and advocate of preserving buildings that were historically significant architectural masterpieces.

Regrettably, Chicago's political leaders, including Mayor Richard J. Daley, and the leaders of the city's building and trade unions wanted the jobs and dollars generated by demolition of existing buildings and the employment and prosperity promised by authorizing new construction projects. Nickel waged a lonely and futile battle as he petitioned the city to preserve and protect historic landmark buildings.

Nickel painstakingly photographed many of the buildings designed by the architectural firm of Adler & Sullivan. He took great care to document Sullivan's ornate design details. Sometimes, Nickel had no sooner developed his film than the residences, office buildings and theaters in his pictures were scheduled to face the wrecking ball.

Nickel lost his own life while he was inside the shell of the once magnificent Stock Exchange Building and the partially demolished building collapsed. Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan were two of the most eminent architects in Chicago history, but time and urban change doomed many of their buildings. Only a handful of their buildings survived the turbulent Sixties. Sullivan was nearly forgotten by the time of his death and his friends had to raise funds to provide him with a proper burial and a cemetery monument.

This is a beautiful book that is lavishly illustrated with photographs. The author incorporated many of Nickel's own notes into the text. Chicago belatedly created a historic landmark commission after many of the most deserving buildings were bulldozed.
So much of Nickel's reputation is tied to his tragic efforts to save and document Chicago's architectural legacy that a critique of his technical and artistic skills often takes second place. The broad scope of the work displayed here illustrates both, as well as giving evidence of his prolific output. The images show a mastery of large and small formats in subject, tone and composition.

All together, a melancholy delight of Modernist photography.