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Download Occam's Razor: An Outside-In View of Contemporary Photography ePub

by Bill Jay

Download Occam's Razor: An Outside-In View of Contemporary Photography ePub
  • ISBN 3923922132
  • ISBN13 978-3923922130
  • Language English
  • Author Bill Jay
  • Publisher Nazraeli Pr (March 1, 1996)
  • Pages 168
  • Formats lrf rtf docx doc
  • Category Photography
  • Subcategory Photography and Video
  • Size ePub 1338 kb
  • Size Fb2 1250 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 351

Book by Jay, Bill

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Occam's Razor: An Outside In View Of Contemporary Photography as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Occam's Razor discusses 20th Century photography in a series of expertly crafted essays on a wide variety of subjects. One essay discusses disturbing images and is especially worthwhile in the aftermath of September 11th

Occam's Razor discusses 20th Century photography in a series of expertly crafted essays on a wide variety of subjects. One essay discusses disturbing images and is especially worthwhile in the aftermath of September 11th. Jay concludes that the "most disturbing subjects threaten our survival as a species. It took a lot of thought to reach this conclusion, which is well supported. I also enjoyed the essays on Diane Arbus, W. Eugene Smith and the explosion of the Hindenberg

As far as author Bill Jay is concerned, photography encroaches .

As far as author Bill Jay is concerned, photography encroaches on all aspects of life, and he touches on a wide range of topics. The book is illustrated with Jay's wonderfully inventive montages of Victorian wood engravings, which alone are almost worth the price of the book. Publisher's Description. In this fascinating collage of essays, photographer Bill Jay touches a multiplicity of areas of photography, ranging from personal reminiscences of Diane Arbus and W. Eugene Smith to essays on photographic craft, art criticism and The Family of Man. Jay's narratives are serious and intriguing with a healthy dose of light-hearted humor.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9783923922130. Release Date:March 1996.

Occam's Razor: an Outside-In View of Contemporary Photography. Cyanide and Spirits: an Inside-Out View of Early Photography. Anthology of essays on 19th century issues, a series of essays collated from the British Journal of Photography. Munich: Nazraeli Press, 1991. Anthology of essays on 20th century issues. Munich: Nazraeli Press, 1992. 61 Pimlico: the Secret Journal of Henry Hayler.

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An Outside-In View of Contemporary Photography. by Bill Jay. Published March 1996 by Nazraeli Press.

An Outside-In View of Contemporary Photography. Artistic Photography, Philosophy, Photography.

My own opinion of him came last year when I sat down to read his book, Occam's Razor.

Image caption Bill Jay with some students on one of his photographic workshops. My own opinion of him came last year when I sat down to read his book, Occam's Razor. It was like someone had switched on a very bright light. Jay's way of writing and beliefs concerning photography were an echo of my own. What happened next I have no explanation for, but I instantly decided that I would make a film about Bill Jay.

Occam’s Razor: An Outside View of Contemporary Photography by Bill Jay. Looking at Photographs. Impressionist Camera: Pictorial Photography in Europe, 1888-1918 ed. by Phillip Prodger, Patrick Daum, and Francis Ribemont. Atget by John Szarkowski. Paul Strand by Paul Strand and Calvin Tomkins. Gustave le Gray: 1820-1884 by Sylvie Aubinas & Gordon Baldwin. Robert Demachy 1859-1936: Photographs & Essays by Robert Demachy.

join us on the internet book of life. Photography is NOT a crime Taking pictures in public places . by V to the P 83 months ago. the black university of the world at cannes film festival 2012 safari prince. Photography is NOT a crime Taking pictures in public places by dizzy mice 94 months ag. Read "Occam's Razor" An Outside View of Contemporary Photography by Bill Jay. Bill's words will inspire you. Read "Camera Lucida" Reflections of Photography by Roland Barthes. In this you will understand one profound view of what makes a great image. As for shooting: Don't be intimidated by your subject, whatever it is.

Talk about Occam's Razor: An Outside-In View of Contemporary Photography


Gnng
This book is a companion volume to Bill Jay's book entitled "Cyanide & Spirits: An Inside View of Early Photography" which focuses on 19th century photography. Occam's Razor discusses 20th Century photography in a series of expertly crafted essays on a wide variety of subjects. One essay discusses disturbing images and is especially worthwhile in the aftermath of September 11th. Jay concludes that the "most disturbing subjects threaten our survival as a species." It took a lot of thought to reach this conclusion, which is well supported. I also enjoyed the essays on Diane Arbus, W. Eugene Smith and the explosion of the Hindenberg.
Even if all the essays don't interest you this book is a must read because Jay writes so well and thoughtfully about photography. He is one of a rare breed.
Shaktizragore
An uneven and loosely connected collection of essays on photography ranging from very instructive (the insight on the cultural context surrounding "The Family of Man" exhibit) to absolutely uninformative (the interview with Diane Arbus where much is made of her reluctance to speak but what is actually discussed after she relaxes & actually gets to talk remains a mystery. Likewise the interview with Bill Brandt where nothing is discussed).

The text is written in a very readable fashion but the style is patronizing and dominated by cliches and commonplace arguments.

In my view, many of the discussions address the concerns of teen-agers interested in becoming photographers. This is perfectly legitimate but it may put off readers who do not fall in this category.

3 stars for the truly informative discussion on Steichen's exhibit and for the lovely illustrations which together justify the purchase.
The Sphinx of Driz
Excellent, insightful essays.
xander
The next time you go to a gallery or museum to see a photography exhibit and can't make heads or tails of the artist's statement or the curator's description about the work (and you also speak the same language that it is written in) then read this book to feel better. Occam's Razor is a serious and well written critique of certain aspects of the world of Fine Art Photography, certain types of academic programs in photography and other related areas. An unusually entertaining and fairly quick read for a book on a subject like this.
Pruster
For forty years I thought there was something wrong with me. I never understood the writing about the subject which is my life's blood. Bill Jay has given me a photographic rebirth. I now know the problem is not my understanding, but the esoteric babble of academic writers. I can not thank Bill Jay in the proper terms. --- Yes I may be able to. I will also pass the word.
Anazan
I bought this collection of essays for the title and its implications in connecting one of the core intellectual principles of science to photography. Bill Jay succeeds quite will in this endeavor through positive assertions of the value of the artisan and photojournalistic aspects of photography over "Fine Art" photography. However, the criticisms of "criticism" and other pseudo-intellectual posturing, including some very funny send-ups, dominated my reading and enjoyment of the book. A particulary acerbic example from a section of the essay "Madonna Made Me Do It" entitled "Get a Rap" goes as follows:

"Copy down a paragraph (any one will do) from a current critical theorist. Memorize it. Then, in front of the mirror, practice a halting, stumbling delivery with screwed-up face until you can recite it as if ther words were being laboriously dredged up from deep in your psyche with gut-wrenching sincerity."

The book was a joy to read and I recommend it to anyone who likes photography but isn't very fond of the blather that surrounds so much of it. The "woodcut" illustrations were a nice bonus.