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Download Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality after the Cold War ePub

by Mr. Paul Shambroom,Richard Rhodes

Download Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality after the Cold War ePub
  • ISBN 0801872022
  • ISBN13 978-0801872020
  • Language English
  • Author Mr. Paul Shambroom,Richard Rhodes
  • Publisher The Johns Hopkins University Press (April 17, 2003)
  • Pages 144
  • Formats mbr docx lrf lrf
  • Category Photography
  • Subcategory Photography and Video
  • Size ePub 1519 kb
  • Size Fb2 1605 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 206

"Here in Paul Shambroom's remarkable photographs are the machines we have built at great expense to destroy millions of human lives... and the men and women whose professional duty it is to maintain them until we learn the deep lesson that the discovery of how to release nuclear energy revealed a natural limit to the scale of human conflict." -- from the Introduction by Richard Rhodes

Although the Cold War ended more than ten years ago, the nuclear dimensions of that conflict remain ever present. The United States alone maintains a nuclear force of over 10,000 warheads; the world's other nuclear powers may possess as many as 20,000 more. Further, the atomic aspirations of such states as Iraq and North Korea continue to spark international crises, while in the wake of September 11, the possibility that terrorists might obtain and use weapons of mass destruction has become frighteningly plausible. For most people, however, nuclear weapons -- whether viewed as a dangerous threat or an effective deterrent -- exist only in the abstract.

In Face to Face with the Bomb, photographer Paul Shambroom documents the components of America's nuclear arsenal, and through his series of striking images which depict the devices and their day-to-day maintenance, he the makes clear the magnitude of the nuclear reality we have created. Taken between 1992 and 2001 at military bases in the United States and the South Pacific, these photographs offer an unprecedented inside look at the missiles, warheads, bombers, submarines, and command centers that make up the far-flung nuclear infrastructure of the United States. Shambroom's full-color prints depict both historic, Cold War--era weaponry shortly before it was mothballed and new warhead designs and missile defense prototypes that may be deployed well into the twenty-first century.

Face to the Face with the Bomb also features an introductory essay by Pulitzer Prize--winning historian Richard Rhodes, who places Shambroom's photographs within the context of the arms race with the Soviet Union, and a prologue by Shambroom, in which he discusses his experiences visiting the country's top-secret nuclear installations. Visually arresting and chillingly matter-of-fact, this volume provides a lasting document of one of the most uncertain, dangerous periods in human history.


Albert Mobilio, Bookforum

Albert Mobilio, Bookforum. - Mary Ann Gwinn, Seattle Times-Post Intelligencer  . Paul Shambroom admits that he is not likely to get more pictures like these after September 11, 2001, but military authorities were still willing to help with information for the notes on pages 111-116, which include long-range plans, such as "The B-2 is expected to remain in service until 2040.

Book Description "Here in Paul Shambroom's remarkable photographs are the machines we have built at great .

Book Description "Here in Paul Shambroom's remarkable photographs are the machines we have built at great expense to destroy millions of human lives. and the men and women whose professional duty it is to maintain them until we learn the deep lesson that the discovery of how to release nuclear energy revealed a natural limit to the scale of human conflict. from the Introduction by Richard Rhodes Although the Cold War ended more than ten years ago, the nuclear dimensions of that conflict remain ever present. The United States alone maintains a nuclear force of over 10,000.

Publisher's Description. His images are powerful reminders of this reality with which we continue to live

Publisher's Description. An important document of American in the nuclear age. Dominated by their striking formal qualities, these photographs reflect an aesthetic sensibility deeply responsive to the advent and infusion of new technologies in our daily surrounding. His images are powerful reminders of this reality with which we continue to live. -Elizabeth Armstrong, Orange County Museum of Art 'Paul Shambroom's Face to Face with the Bomb richly deserves the much abused adjective unique

Face to the Face with the Bomb also features an introductory essay by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Rhodes, who places Shambroom's photographs within the context of the arms race with the Soviet Union, and a prologue by Shambroom, in which he discusses hi. .

Visually arresting and chillingly matter-of-fact, this volume provides a lasting document of one of the most uncertain, dangerous periods in human history.

Start by marking Face to Face with the Bomb . Despite the end of the Cold War, nuclear disarmament remains one of the most contentious issues in international relations. Mr Curtis James rated it it was amazing Jan 02, 2016.

Start by marking Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality After the Cold War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. Potential instability in Russia and the former Soviet republics has heightened concerns about the control of nuclear stockpiles, and in the wake of September 11, the possibility that terrorists might obtain and use nuclear weapons has become frighteni Despite the end of the Cold War, nuclear disarmament remains one of the most contentious issues in international relations.

Face to the Face with the Bomb also features an introductory essay by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Richard Rhodes, who places Shambroom's photographs within the context of the arms race with the Soviet Union, and a prologue by Shambroom, in which he discusses hi.

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Despite the end of the Cold War, nuclear disarmament remains one of the most contentious issues in international relations. Potential instability in Russia and the former Soviet republics has heightened concerns about the control of nuclear stockpiles, and in the wake of September 11, the possibility that terrorists might obtain and use nuclear weapons has become frighteningly real.

Face to face with the bomb:nuclear reality after the Cold War, p. 119. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.

This article relies largely or entirely on a single source. Find sources: "Paul Shambroom" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (November 2017). Paul Shambroom (born 1956) is an American photographer and graduate from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design whose work explores power in its various forms  . Face to face with the bomb:nuclear reality after the Cold War, p.

Shambroom, Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality after the Cold War (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003). Neither to Criticize nor to Glorify: Paul Shambroom's Studied Neutrality. eckitt, 'Neither to Criticize nor to Glorify: Paul Shambroom's Studied Neutrality', in . estlund (e. Paul Shambroom: Picturing Power (Minneapolis: Weisman Art Museum, 2008, pp. 32-45.

Talk about Face to Face with the Bomb: Nuclear Reality after the Cold War


Adaly
This is a thoroughly amazing book of photographs, made possible only because of the brief moments of comparative access atomic photographers (and yes, they have a guild) had between the end of the cold war and 9/11. I've also labored in this vineyard; no one surpasses Shambroom. The book illustrates the Robert Jay Lifton remark he cites at its conclusion: "We must look into the abyss to see beyond it." That pisgah view is what Paul Shambroom gives us. Although he says he intended to neither "criticize" nor "glorify" the weapons, his book does both and neither. Many of the images of our Triadic nuclear forces (and Command and Control structures) horrify with their surreal details; but his fine art photography also beguiles us with some true glimpses of the nuclear sublime. (Plate 35's North Dakota missile silo has the same elegance as a Hudson River School landscape, for example.)
This coffee table volume from hell gets under your skin; these images have entered my dreams.... Even if you aren't interested in this subject, this book is worth a look -- and an excellent introduction to the secret world our tax dollars fund. (Every American should be issued a copy at birth.) This is what lies under the rock of the national security state. We pay for it; thanks to Paul Shambroom, you can see what you're buying into.
Many of the images will surprise you with their power. I won't give any of this away; check this one out for yourself. You won't be sorry you did.
Malojurus
Thank you.
Dead Samurai
Don't question reality. The Introduction by Richard Rhodes asserts that only two of the bombs shown on the cover of this book could "encapsulate as much destructive force as all the explosives used in the Second World War. World War II was a mere two-megaton war." (p. 3). I have heard how much noise a load of conventional bombs dropped by a B-52 makes landing in some mountains a few miles away, and it is easy to believe that since March 1949, the U.S. Strategic Air Command has had the power to destroy targets "in and around seventy Soviet cities (and, collaterally, the cities themselves along with several million Soviet civilians) within thirty days with only 133 atomic bombs" (p. 3), and those bombs were only atomic.
This book would have been impossible a hundred years ago: no such weapons. This book was impossible twenty years ago: in 1984, big brother would not allow anyone who did not have the need to know so much precise knowledge of what was going on. These pictures are proof, but such evidence is still subject to the height of absurdity, if anything can compare with one's own dubious experiences after imagining what this all cost: "The deafening roar brought to mind an image of a giant waterfall, with a wide, endless river of dollar bills cascading into a void" (p. xiii) in the Prologue, but logic is subject to worse reasoning when the photographer was accused "of having fabricated my earlier warhead photos. A public affairs officer said that it was impossible that they would ever have given such permission, and that the photos I was showing them must be fakes" (p. xvii). The military is largely a public institution, full of people who are quite capable of normal behavior, including a few deviations from normal conditions of secrecy when the rest of the world is expected to be entirely cowed by America's immense arsenal.
Paul Shambroom admits that he is not likely to get more pictures like these after September 11, 2001, but military authorities were still willing to help with information for the notes on pages 111-116, which include long-range plans, such as "The B-2 is expected to remain in service until 2040." (p. 116). The note for plate 78 also reveals that we have a fleet of 21 B-2 Spirit "Stealth" bombers that cost "considerably more than 2 billion dollars for each plane." (p. 115). There are not many people in the pictures, and the people are not posed, so working with an elbow and chin up in the Trident II D5 submarine missile nose assembly must be the standard procedure at the Naval Submarine Base King's Bay, Georgia, as shown in Plate 42. Reaching way inside a missile in a truck is a technician in Plate 33. Plate 2 shows a chair for the Secretary of the Air Force Sheila Widnall on December 17, 1993, when the first operational B-2 was delivered, but there are only a few women pictured in the entire book. Plate 20 shows a woman serving a twenty-four-hour "alert" at an underground Launch Control Center in Newell, South Dakota. Plate 71 might show a woman, if the wind in the Marshall Islands is ruffling her hair and making Bermuda shorts balloon out so they look like a skirt. With a military watch and sneakers that look less fancy than the striped running shoes on the guy in the picture who looks like a guy. His/her baseball cap could be an attempt to look like one of the guys. My hair is longer than anyone who is in that picture, but I'm not working at a missile site for a missile defense test.
Anyone who would like to see the sunset reflecting from the cars of a long freight train passing a Minuteman III missile silo in North Dakota might appreciate the panorama in Plate 35. Chain link fence with a few barbed wires on top hardly seems like enough security to keep anything except cows out, but there isn't anything in the fence that would shelter a cow or anyone else in a storm in the silo area, so these tiny Launch Facilities were safe enough for a restricted area in America for years. The impressive pictures show the gigantic size of some objects, like a Trident submarine (Plates 36, 38, 47), a spare Trident submarine bow section plastic part under a tarp from Hitco (Plate 43), PARCS missile warning radar (Plate 58), and the OTH-B bomber detection radar (Plate 65). The telephone poles are very close to the ground compared to the towers for the "3000-foot transmitting antenna (one of three on the site)" (p. 114).
The Department of Energy was also requested to allow some pictures to be taken, as much of the responsibility for plutonium is within their power. I doubt if anything that is more concerned about energy than people will ever have an official documented record of anything it does quite like this book. Plate 72 shows an Abandoned Safeguard missile site in North Dakota, and efforts to deactivate systems are part of the information provided in this book, except such information as only the DOE possesses.
Gigafish
I am one of those folks who, like Paul Shambroom, is totally amazed at the vast nuclear network that is found across our nation.. I envy his good fortune in accessing these amazing nuclear sites and his ability to capture all on film. Over the years, I have seen first hand many of the locations he delivers to us, but often under a tight restrictive atmosphere which usually forbade photography. Paul's photos are very impressive. Missile silos, command and control centers,nuclear bomb storage bunkers, and even inside of 'the mountain' at NORAD. The quality is great, and the simplicity of it all is a bit intimidating.
If you have an interest in the weapons of the nuclear age, your choices are these: Head out to Kirtland AFB to see the Atomic Museum, or get yourself a copy of this informative book. The photos alone are well worth the purchase price. This book belongs out on the coffee table to be seen. I guarantee, you will get some comments and serious conversation.