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Download Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults ePub

by John Franklin

Download Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults ePub
  • ISBN 0117020516
  • ISBN13 978-0117020511
  • Language English
  • Author John Franklin
  • Publisher The Stationery Office/Tso; 2nd edition (March 1, 1999)
  • Pages 175
  • Formats azw lrf doc mobi
  • Category Reference
  • Subcategory Encyclopedias and Subject Guides
  • Size ePub 1703 kb
  • Size Fb2 1101 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 825

Cyclecraft is the definitive guide to safe and enjoyable cycling for both adults and children. Whether you are new to cycling, looking to extend your skills, or wanting to know how best to teach your children to cycle, Cyclecraft offers practical advice on how to ride a bike confidently and safely in modern traffic conditions. This North American edition of Cyclecraft has been specifically adapted to reflect conditions, laws and best practice in the United States and Canada.

A manual of skilled cycling techniques for adults.

A manual of skilled cycling techniques for adults. This text includes advice on: a safe and efficient bike; basic cycling skills; sharing the roads; everyday movements and more difficult manoeuvres; non-traffic hazard; and cycling in town and country, at night and in all weathers. Superb, comprehensive manual covering every aspect of urban/suburban cycling. Pictures come out a bit small on kindle and need zooming in to read but this is a minor quibble. The book assumes no prior knowledge of cycling and covers everything from types of bike to learning how to ride and how to safely ride in traffic.

Start by marking Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques For Adults as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Items related to Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults. John Franklin is a consultant and registered Expert Witness on cycling skills and safety and was a member of the government working group that set up the UK National Standard. Franklin, John Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults. ISBN 13: 9780117020511. Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults.

A manual of skilled cycling techniques for adults

A manual of skilled cycling techniques for adults.

Cyclecraft (. ISBN 978-0-11-703740-3) is a British cycling skills manual written by John Franklin and now published by The Stationery Office. It is the foundation of Bikeability, the UK's national standard for cycle training

Cyclecraft (. It is the foundation of Bikeability, the UK's national standard for cycle training. Its author, John Franklin works as a cycle safety consultant and is registered as an expert witness on cycling matters including cycling on roads, design of cycling facilities, cycling accidents and cycle helmets.

Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults,John Franklin. Cyclecraft: the complete guide to safe and enjoyable cycling for adults and chil.

I stopped cycling in London regularly because of the sheer number of incidents like these I'd see - at least one a week, where the car driver just shrugged and sped off. Get dozens of book recommendations delivered straight to your inbox every Thursday.

Cyclecraft provides a guide to safe cycling both for adults and children. It contains practical advice on how to ride a bike confidently and safely in modern traffic conditions; The following areas are covered, including: how to get started; choosing a bike; basic skills; sharing the road with other traffic; advanced techniques for cycling safety on busier roads and faster traffic; advice on carrying children and goods and riding with others. Cyclecraft provides a guide to safe cycling both for adults and children.

advanced techniques for cycling safely on busier roads with faster traffic. advice on carrying children and goods and riding with others. Cyclecraft is closely associated with Bikeability, the National Cycle Training Standard, for which it is the recommended course book and required reading by cycle training instructors.

Its author, John Franklin works as a cycle safety consultant and is registered as an expert . ISBN 9780117064768), published in June 2009.

Its author, John Franklin works as a cycle safety consultant and is registered as an expert witness on cycling matters including cycling on roads, design of cycling facilities, cycling accidents and cycle helmets. Franklin prefers a vehicular cycling approach, believing that with appropriate training, cyclists of abilities are able to ride safely on most roads, and he advises readers that segregated.

Talk about Cyclecraft: Skilled Cycling Techniques for Adults


Prinna
Everyone who rides a bike on North American roads needs to read this book.

The whole book is excellent, but the best part is about road positioning, which Franklin calls "probably the most important [of all cycling skills]" (p. 92). Here are some key citations.

"...positioning is one of the most important traffic skills for a cyclist to acquire, yet is precisely here that most cyclists perform badly. Many cyclists fail to position themselves properly because of their fear of traffic, yet ironically, it is this very fear that probably puts them most at risk." (p. 91)

"An important rule of road sharing is that no one should unnecessarily impede the passage of anyone else. However, you are quite justified in restricting the movements of other vehicles where this is important for your own safety, and you should not hesitate to do so when necessary."

Franklin has developed the concept of the "primary riding position" which is "in the center of the rightmost line of traffic for the direction in which you wish to travel." Why is this the primary position? Because, "here you will be well within the zone of maximum surveillance of both following drivers and those who might cross your path, and you will have the best two-way visibility of side roads and other features along the road. The road surface will usually be flatter here ...". Earlier on the same page he explains the basis: "Motorists primarily give attention to that part of the highway where is risk to themselves: they are not nearly so good at noticing anything outside their path. This zone of maximum surveillance is often very narrow, especially at higher speeds - it does not extend to much ... For you to be safest as a cyclist, you must normally ride within this zone of maximum surveillance, not outside it." (p 93).

Franklin also introduces the "secondary riding position" which is "about 3 feet to the right of the line of traffic", but recommends using it only when riding there could help others, "so long as your own safety is not thereby impaired." (p. 94). The reason this book is so important to read is because it explains so well why the secondary riding position compromises safety much more, and much more often, than most bicyclists seem to realize.

Reading this book, and applying what you learn to your own riding, can probably even make a very experienced bicyclist much safer.
asAS
I am a cycling noob. I have owned a few "BSOs" (bike shaped objects) in my life, but I'm now exploring my options in the realm of more serious cycling. I would like the bicycle to be a serious transportation option for me, even going so far as to supplant a car for almost all transport needs under 10 miles. However, I'm not confident in my knowledge of the safest way to operate a bicycle in the various situations that I might find myself in. This book instilled me with the knowledge that I will need to develop wisdom as I actually pedal my bike into the road.

Author John Franklin wrote his original Cyclecraft book to focus on UK cycling. After its smashing success, Mr. Franklin rewrote it to take into consideration the needs of North American cyclists (the focus being on US and Canadian cycling; no mention of Mexico is made). The UK book's smashing success appears to have followed it across the pond.

A large reason for the book's success is the imminent practicality all throughout the entire book. First and foremost, it seeks to change readers' minds if perchance they should feel like second class vehicles on the roadway. The book seeks to responsibly remove any timidity from the reader and expects them to 1) Make safety paramount in their decision making process, and 2) Seek peer status with the rest of the vehicles on the road, not to prove any sort of point, but rather to fulfill point #1. Yes, behaving yourself no different from motorized vehicles on a roadway is actually safer for both yourself and those around you. The book explains all the reasoning, situations, and peculiarities of bicycling on roadways.

But don't think that the book only speaks to city bicycling. Far from it. Country bicycling, bicycling near farms, using dirt roads, through fords, and even cattle guards are all discussed. And this book also goes beyond the discussion of putting your tires on the tarmac. It speaks to issues concerning how to transport children, the use of recumbent bikes, and a fairly thorough discussion of tandem bicycles. Not until this book have I ever seriously considered getting a cycling partner and using a tandem bike.

At times the book can be rather dry, going into excruciating details concerning each and every particular scenario that a cyclist could come upon. Single lane, two lane, four lane, divided, undivided, highways, freeways, walkways, daytime, nighttime, on and on and on. Certain portions read like the driver's manual you had to read to earn your driver's license. However, it doesn't take much thought to realize that you are indeed reading a driver's manual. Just one that focuses on a bicycle as your transportation, rather than a motor vehicle.

The author does not throw off any air of arrogance concerning bicycling, as some can. He simply presents the bicycle as another vehicle, and the bicyclist as another vehicle operator. His priority to the safety of all those who share the road is undeniable, and he does encourage the cyclist to keep an emotional intelligence with him as he operates his vehicle to know when to yield his rights when it would make a situation safer. Civility and respect are seen throughout the pages.

Laws affecting cyclists are alluded to throughout the book, but no specific laws are cited. This is of course because laws vary by state, city, county, and other boundaries including time. If the book had focused on law, it would be out of date before the ink dried on the paper. Broad and generalized law is mentioned but the reader is encouraged to seek specific answers to the lawfulness of certain practices in the areas that they ride.

To summarize, the author has done an excellent job of promoting safety and intelligent operation of one of the most efficient and transformative means of locomotion that has been invented. If you plan on doing more than riding circles in a cul-de-sac, you must read this book and understand it.
Worla
In Australia, we use the same (correct!) side of the road as the Brits, so we don't have to translate much. John's sections on riding in traffic are excellent, and if he'd left it at that, this would rate a 5, but he delves into bike fit, still touting the hairy old myth of knee over pedal spindle and other such nonsense, and gets involved in a helmet debate that belongs elsewhere than a book on reduced risk road riding.

If you skip the bike fit myths and anti helmet evangelism, this is a great book on riding on the road, and I highly recommend it.
Mataxe
Well written, great illustrations of many different traffic scenarios. Information about pulling trailers and bike handling that you will not find anywhere else. Important information about riding tandems that is not available in other publications.
This book can make your next bike ride safer, less stressful and more fun because it guides you to take your proper place IN traffic.
Mushicage
An excellent book for beginners who aspire to add cycling to their lifestyle. As well all seasoned cyclists will reconsider their own concepts on techniques of dealing with all issues of everyday riding.I did take issue with the authors lack of treatment of an important piece of safety equipment, the helmet or eyeglass mirror.