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Download It's Greek to Me ePub

by Michael Macrone

Download It's Greek to Me ePub
  • ISBN 0062720449
  • ISBN13 978-0062720443
  • Language English
  • Author Michael Macrone
  • Publisher Harper Paperbacks (May 18, 1994)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats mbr lrf docx mobi
  • Category Reference
  • Subcategory Foreign Language Study and Reference
  • Size ePub 1204 kb
  • Size Fb2 1910 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 326

A treasure trove of information about words and phrases that originated in Greek and Roman texts.

Macrone fills his book with many words and phrases derived from the Greek and Roman history, philosophy, and drama, then adds a chapter of Miscellany.

Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Macrone fills his book with many words and phrases derived from the Greek and Roman history, philosophy, and drama, then adds a chapter of Miscellany. Although we are not all boys and we live now, we can learn these phrases through an easy etymology study prepared for us in "It's Greek to Me!"

It's Greek to Me book.

It's Greek to Me book. Other phrases such "All roads lead to Rome" are also addressed, though Macrone is careful to show that they are not exactly from the source (he notes when they do appear in the forms that we know them-for example, "The face that launched a thousand ships" did not appear until Marlowe).

It's Greek to Me!" is a book for word and phrase lovers, for students of mythology, Latin and Greek .

It's Greek to Me!" is a book for word and phrase lovers, for students of mythology, Latin and Greek, etymologies, for students of linguistics and literature, serious readers, crossword puzzle fans. Allusions to Greek and Latin words and phrases-all come here to the table with Michael Macrone and learn in a fun way the source of the phrases and their meanings today. Is the Sword of Damocles hanging by a hair over your head at work? Don't know what that means?

It's Greek to Me!" is a book for word and phrase lovers, for students of mythology, Latin and Greek . Is the Sword of Damocles hanging by a hair over your head at work? Don't know what that means?

Brush Up Your Classics)-Michael Macrone -It's Greek to Me! .

Brush Up Your Classics)-Michael Macrone -It's Greek to Me! (Brush Up Your Classics)-Michael Macrone. item 2 Macrone, Michael, ITS GREEK TO ME (Brush Up Your Classics), Very Good, Paperback -Macrone, Michael, ITS GREEK TO ME (Brush Up Your Classics), Very Good, Paperback. Paperback Non-Fiction Books in Greek. Paperback Mills & Boon Books in Greek. Fantasy Paperback Fiction Books in Greek. Paperback Antiquarian & Collectable Books in Greek.

HarperCollins Publishers, 1 Ağu 1991 - 238 sayfa. Familiar phrases such as "all in the same boat", "charity begins at home", and "time flies", have their roots in these ancient cultures. A companion volume to the bestselling Brush Up Your Shakespeare.

Michael Macrone, Brown University, Semiotics Department, Alumnus

Michael Macrone, Brown University, Semiotics Department, Alumnus. He has contributed articles to Wired and The San Francisco Chronicle, among other publications

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Michael Macrone is the author of nine entertain-ing guides to literary and intellectual history.

Items related to It's Greek to Me!: Brush Up Your Classics. Michael Macrone; Tom Lulevitch It's Greek to Me!: Brush Up Your Classics. ISBN 13: 9780062700223. It's Greek to Me!: Brush Up Your Classics. Michael Macrone; Tom Lulevitch. Michael Macrone is the author of nine entertain-ing guides to literary and intellectual history. His specialties include the Shakespeare canon, classical writings, mythology, the Bible, and great ideas. He lives in San Francisco, California.

If you've ever had to admit "It's Greek to me" when asked about the story line of The Iliad, Oedipus the King, or The Aeneid (which might as well be written in Greek), then this book is for you.

Talk about It's Greek to Me


Tam
...not too simple book. If you are a lit major, it may be too simple but for the novice, it doesn't get better
Rainbearer
I purchased this as required summer reading for my daughter's school, but found it quite interesting. It helped my to brush-up on that I had learned in high school & forgot. Telling the orign of many of our expressions. I bought it as used, when it arrived it was in very good condition as it was a discarded library book.
Gogal
Wonderful read- full of stories that bring understanding to our everyday expressions.
Meztisho
This book will be fascinating for anyone who is interested in words and expressions. The bits of history associated with the expressions are informative and a delight to read. I enjoyed leafing through it and digesting bits and pieces at a time.
Jonide
One of the delights of "It's Greek to Me" is coming across the unfamiliar origins of familiar phrases, like Pubilius Syrus, circa First century AD, and his "A rolling stone gathers no moss." Niftily, P. Syrus was an actor.

Michael Macrone gives readers a fine omnium gatherum of about 300 such phrases or concepts. All are explained and almost all are accompanied by well-written one page essays. Readable and fascinating, these sometimes correct misinformation, such as "thumbs up" being in Roman times the sign of despatching a wounded gladiator not "He's a good fella; spare his life" approbation.

The essays are far more than definitions; they pack much knowledge in small space, multum in parvo. For example, under "Fascist," just two of the essay's sentences include specifics encompassing Aesop, the dates for the PNF, and its members.

"From the Latin word fascis came the Italian fasci, "bundles, groups," which in the late nineteenth century came to mean "political groupings." Aesop's idea of "strength in unity" was joined to the fascis icon by Mussolini, who organized in 1919 a group of political radicals and outcasts in the Partitio Nazionale Fascista...."

Sources include Homer, Aesop, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Horace, Pliny the Elder, Juvenal, and Miscellaneous, who like Anonymous, is prolific. There is a 15 page glossary of writers and key characters alluded to such as Telemachus, in addition to a thorough index, and a map of sources.

Reader Alert: Although titled, "It's Greek to Me!" the sources are often Roman. Thus, for example, "Time flies" has a citation (accurately) from Virgil's "Georgics" and not a Greek source, if there ever was one. Not a biggie, but readers should expect many Latin sources (translated into English).

The book is generously illustrated with pen & ink drawings. Some are clever indeed such as an Airedale entoga'd to exemplify "cynic" which is derived from Greek/Latin for "dog." Some drawings are not as skillful but nothing really wince-worthy.

Highly recommended for readers who enjoy history, words, and lots of unusual stories told in a lively, engaging manner. There are other books giving English equivalents of Latin & Greek phrases still in use. None of these, as far as I know, are so wisely selective in choice of common phrases & have these excllent story/essays.

At low used book prices, this can be a real deal, too.
Mullador
"It's Greek to Me!" is a book for word and phrase lovers, for students of mythology, Latin and Greek, etymologies, for students of linguistics and literature, serious readers, crossword puzzle fans. Allusions to Greek and Latin words and phrases--all come here to the table with Michael Macrone and learn in a fun way the source of the phrases and their meanings today.

Is the Sword of Damocles hanging by a hair over your head at work? Don't know what that means? "A metaphor for a blow that might fall at any moment, a threat that robs us of any delight in our present safety" is the meaning taken from the story of Dionysus I, tyrant of Syracuse in early fourth century B.C., who took so many precautions to protect a life he could not enjoy. Damocles, who flattered Dionysus that he was really happy was rewarded with many costly gifts and money but had to live with a dangling sword over his head, ready to drop at any moment. Why? So he (Damocles) would always be reminded of how easily he could lose that wealth. He finally asked Dionysus to release him from his happiness (and lose his new wealth) rather than live with a sword over his head.

Another phrase, "Achilles heel," connotes "a fatally weak point of an otherwise unassailable force or plan" (186). The phrase derives from Statis' account of Achilles, when his mother Thetis dips him in the River Styx, holding him by the heel, thus wrapping a film of protection around him, except in that one "fatally weak point." Samuel Taylor Coleridge first used the phrase in English, labeling Ireland "that vulnerable heel of the British Achilles" (1810). George Bernard Shaw called divorce "that Achilles heel of marriage" (1897).

"Fanatic" derives from the Latin "fanum"--temple. Priests who served the Roman war goddess Bellona, annually attended a festival in a fanum, where they tore off their robes and hacked at themselves with axes. This behavior could only have happened through divine inspiration, so "fanaticus" means "crazed by the gods." By 1500's England, "fanatic" meant "crazed person" or "possessed with divine fury," now called a "religious fanatic." Another popular meaning is "fan" or "devotee" or "adherent" to someone or something (204).

"Draconian measures" whips up mental images of fierce justice. In short, after a prolonged campaign to exact vengeance for deeds done, the Athenians appointed Dracon to draw up a system of justice. He did and it became the foundation for all Western judicial systems (38). The punishment for most crimes was death, thus "draconian measures." Later, Plutarch in his "Life of Solon" says that Draco "wrote his laws not with ink, but with blood," or "laws written in blood."

Macrone fills his book with many words and phrases derived from the Greek and Roman history, philosophy, and drama, then adds a chapter of Miscellany. If we were boys who lived in the nineteenth century, we would have studied both languages in school and not need this book of etymologies. Although we are not all boys and we live now, we can learn these phrases through an easy etymology study prepared for us in "It's Greek to Me!"

In case you don't know, the line comes from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar when various characters are talking about documents quietly being passed around town. One asks what is in them. The other replies, "I don't know! It's Greek to me!," meaning he is Roman and doesn't read Greek. "Eureka!" I knew that. What, do you think I live in "Plato's Cave"? I'm pretty sure I "know myself" and will not "repeat the mistakes of the past." I'm going out now to "Seize the Day" and to claim a "lion's share." It's a fact: I never plan to say, "I wish I had never been born!" I just hope someone won't say that my reviews "smell of the lamp!"
Nagor
It's Greek to Me is a nice review of the classical origins of some of the common phrases that are used today. Macrone gives quick reviews of the stories or myths from which these phrases are taken and concisely gives the reader an idea of the classical meaning as well as the modern one.

A nice review for the general reader, but if you wish to delve more deeply into classical myth and literature try Oxford's Classical Dictionary.
I took a class in Greek mythology and found this book to be extremely useful in learning the stories. The only drawback is that the book is not real thorough. But overall, it gives a great overview.