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Download Verbal Hygiene (Routledge Linguistics Classics) ePub

by Deborah Cameron

Download Verbal Hygiene (Routledge Linguistics Classics) ePub
  • ISBN 0415696003
  • ISBN13 978-0415696005
  • Language English
  • Author Deborah Cameron
  • Publisher Routledge; 1 edition (April 7, 2012)
  • Pages 328
  • Formats lrf docx mbr doc
  • Category Reference
  • Subcategory Foreign Language Study and Reference
  • Size ePub 1597 kb
  • Size Fb2 1629 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 986

In Verbal Hygiene, Deborah Cameron takes a serious look at popular attitudes towards language and examines the practices by which people attempt to regulate its use. Instead of dismissing the practice of ‘verbal hygiene’, as a misguided and pernicious exercise, she argues that popular discourse about language values – good and bad, right and wrong – serves an important function for those engaged in it. A series of case studies deal with specific examples of verbal hygiene: the regulation of ‘style’ by editors, the teaching of English grammar in schools, the movements for and against so-called ‘politically correct’ language and the advice given to women on how they can speak more effectively.

This Routledge Linguistics Classic includes a new foreword which looks at how the issues covered in the case studies have developed over time and a new afterword which discusses new concerns which have emerged in the last 15 years, from the regimentation of language in the workplace to panics about immigration and terrorism, which are expressed in linguistic terms.

Addressed to linguists, to professional language-users of all kinds, and to anyone interested in language and culture, Verbal Hygiene calls for legitimate concerns about language and value to be discussed, by experts and lay-speakers alike, in a rational and critical spirit.


Similar books to Verbal Hygiene (Routledge Linguistics Classics).

Similar books to Verbal Hygiene (Routledge Linguistics Classics). Kindle (5th Generation). Along comes Deborah Cameron, a linguist at Strythclyde University (UK) who decides to take a more open-minded look at the attitudes of the traditionalists and offers her colleagues a number of insights meant to scale down the level of hostility between the two camps. Her central notion is there in the title: verbal hygiene. These people look after its welfare, wrong-headed or not, and practice a kind of "hygiene" that counteracts the messiness of uncontrolled growth.

Cameron, Deborah (2012). Classics in Linguistics (Reprint e. London New York: Routledge

Cameron, Deborah (2012). London New York: Routledge. Cameron, Deborah (2000). Cameron, Deborah; Frazer, Elizabeth (1996), "On the question of pornography and sexual violence: moving beyond cause and effect", in Jackson, Stevi; Scott, Sue (ed., Feminism and sexuality: a reader, New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 321–332, ISBN 9780231107082.

Title: Verbal Hygiene Series Title: Routledge Linguistics Classics Published: 2012 Publisher: Routledge .

Routledge Linguistics Classics brings together key seminal books from the rich heritage of Routledge linguistics publishing. Each book is reissued with the original text, and also includes an additional new chapter, foreword or afterword to situate these titles in current scholarship.

Routledge Linguistics Classics, 2012). Euphemisms and Connotations "Subversive innovation may take various forms.

product description page. Verbal Hygiene - (Routledge Linguistics Classics) by Deborah Cameron (Paperback).

Verbal Hygiene - Routledge Linguistics Classics (Hardback). The book deserves to be classed as a 'classic'. Deborah Cameron (author).

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Gugrel
Cameron presents a view of how language changes and how it is monitored both by official bodies and individuals in everyday speech. Recommended for anyone interested in sociolinguistics and subtle modern language change.
Gholbirius
Linguists, most of them scholars and academics, tend to accept that language is in a continuing state of evolution and change. They consider this the natural state of language, and that any attempt to stop change with a set of rigid grammatical rules and notions of standards is either counterproductive or simply wrong-headed.
Lined up against them is a more traditionalist army of grammarians, plain language enthusiasts, and keepers of "correct" usage, who feel that change is undesirable and that the laissez-faire attitude of linguists is an invitation to cultural chaos. These two groups have been at loggerheads for decades, each deeply suspicious of the other.
Along comes Deborah Cameron, a linguist at Strythclyde University (UK) who decides to take a more open-minded look at the attitudes of the traditionalists and offers her colleagues a number of insights meant to scale down the level of hostility between the two camps. Her central notion is there in the title: verbal hygiene.
She proposes that not only does language evolve; it generates its own "caregivers." These people look after its welfare, wrong-headed or not, and practice a kind of "hygiene" that counteracts the messiness of uncontrolled growth. The evolution of language, she says, is actually a dynamic between opposing forces of conservation and innovation. While there is no "right" or "wrong" way to use language, Cameron suggests that language is enlivened by the push and pull between these opposing ideas.
To challenge the idea that standard English exists apart from the people who use it, she provides an account for how it comes into being, at least as she sees it among UK writers. And she challenges the confident trust we might have in the use of dictionaries as a measure of "correctness." Reading her analysis, you realize that dictionaries are part of a circular process that both reflects and determines usage.
Cameron extends her discussion of language with insightful and entertaining analyses of "political correctness," communication between genders, and the types of politically-inspired public hysteria that spring up around the schools' perceived failure to teach correct grammar. She even takes to task our confident acceptance of George Orwell's dictums in his often cited essay, "Politics and the English Language."
This is a book for anyone fascinated by not only the language of politics but the politics of language. Its ideas are argued thoughtfully and with considerable insight. As companions to this book I'd also recommend the books of American linguist Deborah Tannen ("You Just Don't Understand") and Simon Winchester's account of the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary, "The Professor and the Madman."