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by Rory Stewart

Download The Places in Between ePub
  • ISBN 0330486330
  • ISBN13 978-0330486330
  • Language English
  • Author Rory Stewart
  • Publisher Picador; First Edition edition (2004)
  • Pages 336
  • Formats azw docx mobi rtf
  • Category Reference
  • Subcategory Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Size ePub 1403 kb
  • Size Fb2 1926 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 874

In January 2002 Rory Stewart walked across Afghanistan-surviving by his wits, his knowledge of Persian dialects and Muslim customs, and the kindness of strangers. By day he passed through mountains covered in nine feet of snow, hamlets burned and emptied by the Taliban, and communities thriving amid the remains of medieval civilizations. By night he slept on villagers' floors, shared their meals, and listened to their stories of the recent and ancient past. Along the way Stewart met heroes and rogues, tribal elders and teenage soldiers, Taliban commanders and foreign-aid workers. He was also adopted by an unexpected companion-a retired fighting mastiff he named Babur in honor of Afghanistan's first Mughal emperor, in whose footsteps the pair was following.Through these encounters-by turns touching, con-founding, surprising, and funny-Stewart makes tangible the forces of tradition, ideology, and allegiance that shape life in the map's countless places in between.

This is the summary of The Places in Between by Rory Stewart

This is the summary of The Places in Between by Rory Stewart. Автовоспроизведение Если функция включена, то следующий ролик начнет воспроизводиться автоматически. Майк Тайсон - Самый жесткий панчер в боксе! - Продолжительность: 18:09 The World of Boxing! Recommended for you. 18:09.

Ships from and sold by tromac1. In January 2002, having just spent 16 months walking across Iran, Pakistan, India, and Nepal, Stewart began a walk across Afghanistan from Herat to Kabul.

I discovered this author, Rory Stewart, because of his book on walking along Hadrian's Wall Pathway as my son and I had walked part of the pathway

I discovered this author, Rory Stewart, because of his book on walking along Hadrian's Wall Pathway as my son and I had walked part of the pathway. I enjoyed it so much I bought two more of his books. This one was in an area I was completely unfamiliar with but again he made me feel I was there with him. The way he wove the history of Afghanistan into the area he walked through while giving the recent events and conditions was truly brilliant.

The Places in Between book. In January 2002 Rory Stewart walked across g by his wits, his knowledge of Persian dialects and Muslim customs, and the kindness of strangers. By day he passed through mountains covered in nine feet of snow, hamlets burned and emptied by the Taliban, and communities thriving amid the remains of medieval civilizations.

The Places in Between is a travel narrative by Rory Stewart, a British member of Parliament, writer, and former diplomat, detailing his solo walk across north-central Afghanistan in 2002. Stewart arrives in Afghanistan in January 2002, beginning his journey in Herat and proceeding on foot to Kabul. He is initially accompanied by two armed guards, Qasim and Abdul Haq, at the insistence of Governor Yuzufi but travels without human company for most of his walk, accompanied only by his dog, Babur

Rory Stewart's first book, "The Places in Between," recounts his journey across Afghanistan in January 2002. Even in mild weather in an Abrams tank, such a trip would be mane-whitening.

Rory Stewart's first book, "The Places in Between," recounts his journey across Afghanistan in January 2002. But Stewart goes in the middle of winter, crossing through some territory still shakily held by the Taliban - and entirely on foot. There are some Medusa-slayingly gutsy travel writers out there - Redmond O'Hanlon, Jeffrey Tayler, Robert Young Pelton - but Stewart makes them look like Hilton sisters.

I led Babur down to drink in the Hari Rud, terrifying a woman who had crouched under the bridge to relieve herself.

I led Babur down to drink in the Hari Rud, terrifying a woman who had crouched under the bridge to relieve herself me in silence. I asked to see Haji Nasir, to whom I had a letter of introduction. None of them moved or spoke. I asked if there was somewhere I could put Babur and they replied, "Nowhere. "But surely you have animal sheds. Where are they?"Silence. Where is Haji Nasir?". Perhaps in the mosque.

In January 2002 Rory Stewart walked across g by his wits, his knowledge of Persian dialects and Muslim customs, and the kindness of strangers. The Places in Between - Rory Stewart. The Places in Between. Along the way Stewart met heroes and rogues, tribal elders and teenage soldiers, Taliban commanders and foreign-aid workers.

The Places in Between.

The New Civil Service. Most Afghans seemed to glide up the centre of the lobby staircase with their shawls trailing behind them like Venetian cloaks. But these men wore western jackets, walked quietly and stayed close to the banister. I felt a hand on my shoulder. It was the hotel manager. He had never spoken to me before. I'm sorry, no,' I said. They are from the government.

Talk about The Places in Between


Dishadel
In 1972 I did the "Overland" trip from Sydney, Australia, to London including the Malay peninsular, Penang-Madras boat, India, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran etc. Afghanistan was considered pretty dangerous then and we travelled in convoy with another couple, also in a VW Kombi, from ghastly Pakistan and the graveyard of British regiments, the Khyber Pass ( the Kabul pass is far more spectacular), south-west to Kandahar (vineyards on the hills) and north-west to Herat. What Mr Stewart did, to walk directly east from Herat to Kabul would have been considered insane then. It is a sad measure of the continued failure of the human race that it seems even more dangerous now. His book is tremendous. It is not meant to be anti-religion. But its brilliant insights into Islam are just as scary as looking into the pig-ignorance of the modern day Bible Belt in the US (where I now live) or the smug Vatican or the Israel-Palestine impasse, in general. As long as we have religion, there is no bright logical future for humans on earth.
Jairani
I remember reading this book a decade ago and it changed my view of the Middle East. I lost the book in a move, but I just reordered a copy for my husband to read. That's how deeply it has touched me. Even today, I can still close my eyes and see the imagery of Rory's travels. It has made me believe in the kindness of people, despite a raging duality -- even cruelty -- brought on by a harsh reality. It is a wonderful read for anyone who wishes to discover the area... through someone else's eyes, as I did given the fact that current affairs have made it impossible for me to ever experience it firsthand. This is not a "soft" read and it is at times gut wrenching, but it is well worth it.
Briciraz
This was a captivating, very unusual book. I read it a couple months ago, and am still thinking about it. I learned a lot about Afghanistan and Rory Stewart. The weaving of history with the inclusion of bits of the historical diary of Afghanistan's first Mughal emperor whose steps Stewart followed, added another level of fascination and depth. Stewart is not only an articulate, gifted writer, but also an unusually spirited person with an almost uncanny sense of survival. However, his need to push on at times, dangerously exhausted, in the face of life threatening danger presented a psychological dilemma that I grappled with on several occasions, trying to figure out this most unusual man. I was also moved by his relationship with the dog he adopted early in his journey.
Dreladred
Enjoying every step of the journey. Rory Stewart's perceptive acceptance of a foreign world, leaves me shaking my head in admiration. I'm reading the book slowly, a chapter every few days. The author's desire to understand and experience things around him, overtakes his sense of self preservation. The book gives us an insight into the journey of an incredibly kind, brave and intelligent human being. His book has given me a window into the way things are in Afghanistan, and showed me a little of the structured hierarchy within village life.
Winenama
I discovered this author, Rory Stewart, because of his book on walking along Hadrian's Wall Pathway as my son and I had walked part of the pathway. I enjoyed it so much I bought two more of his books. This one was in an area I was completely unfamiliar with but again he made me feel I was there with him. The way he wove the history of Afghanistan into the area he walked through while giving the recent events and conditions was truly brilliant. His verbal snapshots of the characters he met along the way were interesting and enlightening. I also enjoyed the sketches he included in the book. Rory himself is courageous and strong. He makes you want to travel by foot to explore the world. Those who love history, travel and hiking will love this book.
Brakree
If you like adventure books and want to learn something about the numerous villages and Afghanistan people from a micro level, I think you will enjoy this book about a young Scott who desires to walk the width of Afghanistan. It is a more a micro version because although there are broad references to the Russian occupation, Talaban, the Northern Alliance and the Karzai; the book is more about Stewart's personal interactions with individuals along the way. You'll find more references to the preceding travels of the Muslim conqueror Babur who traveled Stewart's intended path than the overall state of Afghanistan; however you get a genuine picture of the home life of many of the Afghan's whose Muslim religion encourages them to welcome strangers and share what they have. There are descriptions of many villages destroyed/damaged by the Talaban, including mass executions, and the effects of Russian attacks. There are interesting uncertainties concerning the loyalty of some village/area leaders who were once Talaban and could still be in some cases. many switched sides based on what benefited them realistically, Stewart is periodically challenged but carries on through letters of introduction. I do wish he had provided more detail on the lifestyles of the Afghans of different villages and their customs and family interaction but it was a fast paced travelogue more focused on his physical challenges to the environment and his own tolerance to limited food many times offered by very poor families. I did find his interaction with a large mastiff engaging although the animal was not conditioned for the journey, he apparently filled a void for companionship that Stewart avoided during his walkathon. it is a fast paced read and a more narrow view than some readers would expect but I was impressed that Stewart was fluent enough in the language to converse readily across the country and that he had the physical endurance to complete the travels. What was a depressing picture of this war torn country was a encounter with land mines is when Stewart asks a village if the land mines they were avoiding were left by the Talaban and the villager says "no they are ours but we forgot their locations".
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