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Download They Have A Word For It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases ePub

by Howard Rheingold

Download They Have A Word For It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases ePub
  • ISBN 0874774640
  • ISBN13 978-0874774641
  • Language English
  • Author Howard Rheingold
  • Publisher Tarcher; 1 edition (February 1, 1988)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats lrf lrf docx txt
  • Category Reference
  • Subcategory Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Size ePub 1395 kb
  • Size Fb2 1462 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 719

Examples taken from more than forty different languages demonstrate the ability of other languages to provide words for objects or thoughts that English lacks

While collecting words for this book, Rheingold says he "became sympathetic to the idea that we think and . This book is a lot of fun and well put together.

While collecting words for this book, Rheingold says he "became sympathetic to the idea that we think and behave the way we do in large part because we have words that make these thoughts and behaviors possible, acceptable, and useful. Approximately 150 foreign words and phrases are divided into 11 sections, including family, business, politics, beauty, psychology, love, etc. One or two pages are used to describe each word, giving the pronunciation as well as its use in the native tongue and applicability to English.

The title claims it contains "untranslatable" words, but this is outright lies. The only drawback is the indexing of the book

The title claims it contains "untranslatable" words, but this is outright lies. The only drawback is the indexing of the book. You can't locate words easily.

It has to do with the insidious way words mold thoughts. It all started with a friendly lunch. Jeremy Tarcher is the kind of publisher a writer dreams about. Words that would open a window on the way other cultures encourage people to think and feel, and thus point out new ways for us to think and feel. Oh, you mean words like wabi, I said. What does it mean?It's a Japanese concept for a certain.

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Word for It: Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words & Phrases. Each one has their own words and phrases that are entirely untranslatable without several sentences of explanation.

They Have a Word for It: Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words & Phrases.

It's called "They Have a Word For It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases. VOA's Adam Phillips interviewed Mr. Rheingold at his California home. It's the most familiar object among many, mostly foreign, curios that fill his colorful home office. As a freelance writer, Mr. Rheingold has authored several books and countless magazine articles

Mobile version (beta).

Mobile version (beta). They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 4. 7% restored. Главная They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases. They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases

They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases by Howard Rheingold (see .

They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases by Howard Rheingold (see here). It's not the sort of text I would reference in an academic paper but maybe it'll inspire you to investigate further.

The Meaning: Aware is a word, quite well-known, for the bittersweetness of. .They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable.

The Meaning: Aware is a word, quite well-known, for the bittersweetness of a brief and fading moment of transcendent beauty. It's that "last burst of summer" feel, or the transience of early spring. It seems his information came from a book called HodgePodge, by J Bryan in 1986. Before that, it looks like it came from a mistaken translation and conglomeration of two words, one of which means 'a lost love' and the other meaning 'whore'. 5 purchased by readersGMG may get a commission.

Talk about They Have A Word For It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words and Phrases


Vikus
This book is a lot of fun and well put together. Approximately 150 foreign words and phrases are divided into 11 sections, including family, business, politics, beauty, psychology, love, etc. One or two pages are used to describe each word, giving the pronunciation as well as its use in the native tongue and applicability to English. Words are taken primarily from the Romance languages -- French, Italian and Spanish -- but also from Chinese, Japanese, Navajo, Sanskrit, Bantu and at least a dozen others.

There is an interesting introduction, a bibliography and an index.

In the introduction the author mentions that he culled these samples from a list of hundreds; this might be an instance where an accompanying web site giving all of the words considered might be a lot of fun and very useful.

Highly recommended.
Eigonn
I have read about this book in a novel and I have got intrigued sbout it. Thus I ordered it and I am happy that I did it. It is like you discover an Universe of new spicy, flavoured, unusual (from our perspective) and unexpected words. From personal point of view, I may say that spme words have equivalent in my mother tongue (Romanian) and it may be , as well, some Romanian words which deserve to be in this book.
Lilegha
There is no better book for an appreciation of the ways in which different languages convey meaning! Light-hearted, but substantivel. There is nobody who would not enjoy this book! i have bought copies of it for many of my friends, who then have gone on to buy copies for their friends. If you love words, this is the book for you!
Nuliax
I bought this for Christmas because my daughter, a Spanish teacher, loves linguistics. Turns out she had it already, but was glad to get another copy since she gave her other copy to her brother a couple years ago.
Qudanilyr
I have learned beautiful words, such as wabi and sabi.
Boraston
Same as previous. I thought maybe it was a revised copy.
Malogamand
How many times have you thought to yourself, 'I wish there were a word for this' ? Sometimes a feeling, sometimes an object, sometimes a description simply defies a simple one or two word construction, but rather involves lengthy comparison and development to get the point across, and often (particularly in conversation) doing such development leads away from the main topic of discussion.
Despite the vastness of the English vocabulary and the rich depth of heritage (a heritage strong on borrowing and adaptation), there are simply some things the English language lacks. I was reminded of this when writing a review on an archaeology book, in which the varying sense of history come through rather more clear in German than in English, where alternate words for history lose the historical sense.
This reminded me of the wonderful book by Howard Rheingold: They Have a Word for It: A Lighthearted Lexicon of Untranslatable Words & Phrases. Originally published in 1988, it is now back in print, and was a recent selection in one of the book clubs to which I am an over-subscriber. Rheingold is the author of many books, many on topics of technology, creativity, and intelligence. Perhaps he is best known for The Millennium Whole Earth Catalog, published in 1994.
`This book is meant to be fun. Open it at random and see if you don't find something that will amuse you, entertain you, titillate your curiosity, tickle your perspective. But you should know that reading this book might have serious side effects at a deeper level. Even if you read one page as you stand in a bookstore, you are likely to find a custom or an idea that could change the way you think about the world. It has to do with the insidious way words mold thoughts.' Indeed, this is true. The old dictum, 'don't think about elephants', is very true for this book. Each page will cause you think and ponder beyond the box of the English language.
Given Rheingold's technological interests, part of this book was researched, assembled, and created on early computer bulletin board services (BBS), which yielded for Rheingold both new friendships as well as interesting contributions of untranslatable words. Rheingold offered dinner to contributors of valuable additions. `Thinking about the right kind of untranslatable words creates a certain state of mind. I found myself looking at the mundane elements of everyday life through a new kind of lens, which revealed to me dimensions in my familiar environment that I simply had not seen before because I hand't known how to look.'
Words define who we are and how we see the word. Whether one lives in a literate society or not, whether one has other forms of intelligence (see Gardner's `Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences') such as musical, mathematical, etc., the way people are socialised and educated in most every society since the advent of language has been in terms of language, both oral and written. Humans have striven to put things into ever more precise and meaningful yet full and adaptable language.
Rheingold breaks his analysis of untranslatable words into the following categories:
- Human Family Affairs: People Words
- You Are What You Say: Words of Power
- Dance of the Sexes: Men, Women, and the Words Between Them
- The Eye of the Beholder: Conceptions of Beauty
- Serious Business: Words About Work and Money
- States of Mind: Words, Thoughts, and Beyond
- Life Is But a Dream: The Jargon of Mental Technologists
- Spiritual Pathwords: The Map, the Territory, and the Mystery
- The Body Politic: Words and Social Action
- Toolwords: Technology and Worldviews
- Strange Memes: Language Viruses
English speakers have long been familiar with words such as Tao, a Chinese concept that means many things such as 'the way', 'the process', etc., or Shalom, the Hebrew multiple-purpose word for peace, greeting, parting, etc. Religion has had enough trouble being put into words in any language to be clearly articulated in any given one (hence the problems of translation and explanation from texts in one language to cultures in another). Perhaps it will be part of your dharma to understand more of these concepts, in and beyond English.
There are interesting ideas here, that English would find very useful. Drachenfutter, a word from the German, roughly means 'a peace offering from guilty husbands for wives'. More literally meaning 'dragon fodder' (not an image most wives would be happy to be associated with, if indeed the 'dragon' refers to the wife), it has been a rather common idea in Germanic cultures in the past. The Russian word razbliuto in essence stands for the feeling (not quite of love, but perhaps close) that a person has for someone once loved but now longer the object of affection.
This is a wonderfully entertaining and enlightening work, that will give hours of pleasure and can spark many conversations, untranslatable though they may be! With interesting words from every continent and many historical periods, this will broaden your perspective of the ways in which people have seen the world and communicated their understandings of the world to others. `If you want to change the way people think, you can educate them, brainwash them, bribe them, drug them. Or you can teach them a few carefully chosen new words.'
I love languages. Each one has their own words and phrases that are entirely untranslatable without several sentences of explanation. As I have learned Italian over the last few years (in order to converse with my wife's relatives) I have found certain phrases in English that just don't translate into Italian directly. Now the tables are turned, as this book provides me with some Italian phrases that have a much deep meaning than might be imagined.
The author, Howard Rheingold, has collected words for a lot of different languages, including Chinese, Hindi, Italian, French and even Hawaiian. In fact, one of my favorites comes from that language. ho'oponopono (HO-OH-poh-no-poh-no). It means "solving a problem by talking it out", something that I do on a regular basis (even if I am only talking to myself!)
Italian gives us attaccabottoni ("a doleful bore who buttonholes people and tells sad, pointless tales.") I have run into a few of these in my life, so it is nice to have a new word with which to reference them. (SMILE)
Each time I flip through the book I find more and more interesting words. Rheingold encourages you to start using the words in your vocabulary and I think I just might try. That way, the next time a friend bangs his or her thumb with a hammer you can reply "uffda", a Swedish "word of sympathy, used when someone else is in pain."