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Download Reporting Iraq: An Oral History of the War by the Journalists who Covered It ePub

by Mike Hoyt,John Palattella,Columbia Journalism Review

Download Reporting Iraq: An Oral History of the War by the Journalists who Covered It ePub
  • ISBN 1933633344
  • ISBN13 978-1933633343
  • Language English
  • Author Mike Hoyt,John Palattella,Columbia Journalism Review
  • Publisher Melville House (October 22, 2007)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats lrf mobi txt lit
  • Category Reference
  • Subcategory Writing Research and Publishing Guides
  • Size ePub 1449 kb
  • Size Fb2 1586 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 600

The world's best known reporters tell the story of what really happened in Iraq in a gripping and gritty narrative history of the war. Included are contributions from fifty international journalists, including Dexter Filkins, The New York Times correspondent who won widespread praise for his coverage of Fallujah; Rajiv Chandrassekaran, author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City; Anthony Shadid of the Washington Post, who won the Pulitzer Prize for his war coverage; Richard Engel of NBC; Anne Garrels of NPR, and other star reporters from both the print and broadcast world, not to mention their translators, photo journalists, and a military reporter. All come together to discuss the war from its beginning on, and they hold back nothing on the violence they faced—Farnaz Fassihi of the Wall Street Journal talks about her near–kidnapping by "five men with AK–47s" chasing her car. ("I kept thinking, 'This is it.'") Nor do they hold back discussing how this impacted their work—British reporter Patrick Cockburn of The Independent notes that "One had to spend an enormous amount of time thinking about one's own security," and NPR reporter Deborah Amos observes that it was even more complicated for women: "As time went on we had to dress as Iraqi women, in the most conservative costumes Iraqi women would wear." But perhaps the most fascinating—and chilling—observation is that most saw a disaster in Iraq unfolding long before they were allowed to report it. As Jon Lee Anderson of The New Yorker puts it, various governmental authorities and the media's own fears combined "to keep bad news away from the public," an observation supported by over 21 stunning, full–color photographs—many of which have never been published before due to such censorship. Collected by the editors of America's most prestigious media monitor, the Columbia Journalism Review, such revelations make Reporting Iraq a fascinating and unique look at the war, as well as an important critique of international press coverage.

An excellent oral histor. eing conversational, Reporting Iraq is much easier to read than a long news story

An excellent oral histor. eing conversational, Reporting Iraq is much easier to read than a long news story. It is also blunt, and the reader may be thankful that it is organized so it can be taken in small doses. Describes the dangers reporters face trying to cover a conflict where just looking foreign makes you suspicious and where roadside bombs are a random and constant threat.

Mike Hoyt, John Palattella.

A gritty and gripping narrative history of the run–up to war to the present quagmire.

This vital, breathtaking collection may be the closest contemporary reporting gets to cutting through the fog of war. - Publishers Weekly. He lives in Teaneck, New Jersey. A gritty and gripping narrative history of the run–up to war to the present quagmire.

Ali Fadhil, a documentary producer, and journalists Deborah Amos (NPR), Anne Barnard (New York Times/Boston Globe), and Elizabeth Palmer (CBS) were contributors to the book

In 2004 he oversaw the launch of CJR’s political journalism site, Campaign Desk, which later became CJ. rg.

The book, published this month by the University of Texas Press, was written by Michael Kamber, who covered the war for eight years for The New York . Any journalist hoping to photograph a wounded soldier needed his permission

The book, published this month by the University of Texas Press, was written by Michael Kamber, who covered the war for eight years for The New York Times. Among the 39 photojournalists in the book are Andrea Bruce, Carolyn Cole, Stanley Greene, Tyler Hicks, Chris Hondros, Yuri Kozyrev, Khalid Mohammed and Joao Silva. The following essay is from Dexter Filkins’s introduction. Any journalist hoping to photograph a wounded soldier needed his permission. It’s not hard to see the absurdity in the wounded-soldier rule: It was difficult to get a soldier’s permission before he had suffered his injury, and nearly impossible after.

Rich with anecdote and illustrated with color g many never before published in . Iraq is a major event. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Valuable insight into war reporting. com User, December 2, 2008

Valuable insight into war reporting. com User, December 2, 2008. This will give anyone who wonders about how the news (particularly the news of a controversial war) is transmitted to them via newspaper, television or radio. Inside the inside story.

Talk about Reporting Iraq: An Oral History of the War by the Journalists who Covered It


lets go baby
This will give anyone who wonders about how the news (particularly the news of a controversial war) is transmitted to them via newspaper, television or radio. The interviewers have spoken to some of the best of the reporters who covered the invasion of Iraq at the side of the troops (Peter Maas wrote one of the most thoughtful and chilling reports on what it's like to be combat for the NY Times magazine that I have ever read, and is included in this) as well as those who were in Baghdad.

Most importantly, this shows how with each week and month that passed, the challenges of reporting what was happening within Iraq grew. The story became more complex and the dangers of trying to obtain accurate first hand information became more acute. At the same time, the frustration within the United States has only grown -- hunting for certainties that are thin on the ground, it has become more common to hear politicians and others lash out against "the media" for failing to show the "real" truth of life in Iraq.

Anyone who takes the time to even skim through this oral history will quickly realize that there may be no single truth, much less one that is easily understood by an American public looking for simple narratives. Moreover, readers will marvel that many of the journalists who have traveled to Baghdad over and over again are willing to repeatedly put their lives in jeopardy to try and explain what is happening there.

For anyone interested in delving more deeply, I'd suggest two quasi-memoirs. Naked in Baghdad: The Iraq War and the Aftermath as Seen by NPR's Correspondent Anne Garrels and Waiting for an Ordinary Day: The Unraveling of Life in Iraq are both tales of trying to report what is happening in Iraq.
Naa
I loved this candid look at covering Iraq from the people who were there. The dangers, the disappointments, frustrations, and heartache were palpable. If you care at all about the stories behind the stories, you should consider this book.
Abandoned Electrical
This book is remarkable for its previously unreported insights and candor. I suppose the participating journalists have nothing to lose now when they talk about the challenges of reporting the war in Iraq. Still, they illuminate how clumsy the efforts were to control what they reported by limiting access or intimidation. It didn't take long for reporters to recognize the gap between ground truth and what was being pitched from the lecturn. This left a credibility gap that should have been forseen, reducing support for the war, whatever the merits. One story still unwritten is the role of Dan Senor when he headed the strategic communications team from the Green Zone. Did he take orders from others in Washington, or did he create policy on his own? Reporters told me they often didn't trust him, but they had no choice but report his observations. Second sourcing was often impossible. We all know there was little Phase IV planning, but the failure to plan for a credible, effective communications organization ranks high among the unforgivable ommissions. The military spokesmen were more credible than Bremer's folks, but military PAOs were not totally independent. It got to the point where Gen Sanchez and Amb Bremer wouldn't brief the media as a team, or so I was told. High marks to Mike Hoyt and John Palattella for assembling this imporessive undertaking.