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Download Buddha's Not Smiling : Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today ePub

by Erik D. Curren

Download Buddha's Not Smiling : Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today ePub
  • ISBN 0977225305
  • ISBN13 978-0977225309
  • Language English
  • Author Erik D. Curren
  • Publisher Alaya Press (February 22, 2006)
  • Pages 348
  • Formats doc lrf azw docx
  • Category Religion
  • Subcategory Buddhism
  • Size ePub 1154 kb
  • Size Fb2 1556 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 848

The Day the Last Monastery in Shangri-La Fell- Buddha's Not Smiling is the anatomy of a crisis. Rumtek was not in China, and its attackers were not Communist troops. It was Tibetan lamas themselves who led the siege.

Book Summary of Buddha's Not Smiling:Uncovering Corruption At . .The current Dalai Lama, is not without contention within his own Tibetan exile community

Book Summary of Buddha's Not Smiling:Uncovering Corruption At .Start by marking Buddha's Not Smiling: Uncovering Corruption At The Heart Of Tibetan Buddhism Today as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The current Dalai Lama, is not without contention within his own Tibetan exile community. The book revolves mainly around one issue: why does Dalai Lama force his choice of reincarnation "candidate" to the other schools of Vajrayana, and why his supporters violently attack the "candidate" chosen by the Karmapa school, which had so far enjoyed an independent right of Lama-nomination until the end of 20th century?

The First Tulku of Tibet Today, in Tibetan Buddhism, there are hundreds of lamas reputed to be tulkus

Books Buddhist Buddha Buddha’s Not Smiling (Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today). Buddha’s Not Smiling (Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today). The First Tulku of Tibet Today, in Tibetan Buddhism, there are hundreds of lamas reputed to be tulkus. The Dalai Lama-the current incarnation Tenzin Gyatso is the fourteenth of his life-is the most famous tulku of Tibet. But he and his thirteen predecessors were not the first lamas said to take rebirth intentionally to continue their work as bodhisattvas.

Buddha's Not Smiling : U.has been added to your Cart. I'm a long time student of Tibetan Buddhism, but am not much interested or involved in the Kagyu Lineage, yet by the end of this book I was feeling both well informed and passionate about the subject (I really look forward to being able to meet Thaye Dorje Karmapa some day)

of the earth and to human civilization. of Tibetan Buddhism today. Dietary Reference Intakes.

of the earth and to human civilization. Today there is no question that the human species has the capability. Buddha's not smiling: Uncovering corruption at the heart of Tibetan buddhism today. 47 MB·35 Downloads·New! of Tibetan Buddhism today. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·13,681 Downloads·New!

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Please consider making little donation to help us expand the encyclopedia. Enjoy your readings here and have a wonderful day! Pages in category "BUDDHA'S NOT SMILING: UNCOVERING CORRUPTION AT THE HEART OF TIBETAN BUDDHISM TODAY by Erik D. Curren". The following 22 pages are in this category, out of 22 total.

See "Buddha's Not Smiling : Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today" by Erik D. Curren) The Zen monasteries in Japan held. show more As bad as the Chinese rule of Tibet is, it is significantly better than the Buddhist rule, which even allowed slavery to persist until the Chinese invaded.

Buddhas Not Smiling - Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today. Buddhist monk Geshe Konchog Wangdu reads Mahayana sutras from an old woodblock copy of the Tibetan Kangyur Transmission and realization There is a long history of oral transmission of teachings in Tibetan Buddhism. Oral transmissions by lineage holders traditionally can take place in small groups or mass gatherings of listeners and may last for seconds (in the case of a mantra, for example) or months (as in the case of a section of the Tibetan Buddhist canon).

Talk about Buddha's Not Smiling : Uncovering Corruption at the Heart of Tibetan Buddhism Today


Malodred
I was a bit skeptical of this book at first because of the nature of this partisan controversy, and the investigative reporter style of writing, yet pretty quickly I was taken in and fully absorbed. I'm a long time student of Tibetan Buddhism, but am not much interested or involved in the Kagyu Lineage, yet by the end of this book I was feeling both well informed and passionate about the subject (I really look forward to being able to meet Thaye Dorje Karmapa some day).

This book appears to be well researched and documented (lots of fascinating historical details and insider accounts), as well as including some helpful pictures, appendices, chronology of events and glossary, and it reads like a leCarre' novel at times - engrossing, convoluted, outrageous and impossible to put down. This is a side of Tibetan culture most Western devotees and outsiders are unaware of, yet this autocratic approach is at the root of how and why Tibet fell to the communists in '59.

My reading experience alternated between disgust, fascination, delight and sadness; sadness for everyone involved, delight that the wizard's curtain was finally being pulled back, fascination to see the utter petty humanness of it all, and disgust to learn of a few so-called "high" Lamas who's debased motives and involvement have led to such a split in the religious community. And this isn't simple political power grabbing, it involves high crimes of treason (to the Kagyu lineage), theft, assault (beatings, killings, & assasinations), forgery, bribery and deceit....

This book appears to be the most unbiased and informative account written so far about this controversy (On further study I discover a couple of the more horrible/outrageous aspects of the story were left out, probably for liability reasons.). It will probably interest a wide range of curious and intelligent readers, but for Tibetan Buddhists, especially Karma Kagyu followers, it is essential reading. I could easily list the dozen or so basic points of the controversy for you, but that would spoil your reading experience. No matter whether you have taken sides already, or never will, this book is worth reading. After all the horrors exposed here (both historic and current), this book amazingly left me on an upbeat note - the possibility of reconciliation. As Thaye Dorje Karmapa says, this will pass, the controversy will eventually be resolved as similar ones have in the past, and the dharma (truth) is too strong to be harmed. I hope he is right. And I hope we all learn something...and allow ourselves to be changed by this unchanging dharma.
Efmprof
I found some of the other Karmapa controversy books a little too innocent about Tibetan politics and history. Curren is not blinded by the Shangri-La fantasy Westerners tend to have for Tibetans and Tibetan Lamas. His source material extends well beyond any borders.

It is a page turner, and I found myself unable to put the book down.

The subject matter gets a little weighed down by lengthy details about court cases in Sikkim and other boring incidents, but it also shows he did his research well.

An other great book for Buddhists who want to dig into layers of misconceptions about Tibetan Buddhism is Donald Lopez', "Prisoners of Shangri-LA".

I personally think these reads are great for people like me who intend to have a daily practice for the rest of their lives.

I gave it 4 stars instead of 5 because I think the title is silly, and doesn't reflect the intelligence of its contents.
Ice_One_Guys
I have been reading dispassionately all of the books regarding the controversy surrounding the Karmapas. I am not a Buddhist so I don't have a predetermined opinion about any of them. I have a couple more books on this issue to read but so far this book is the most comprehensive look at the controversy despite the author's admitted bias for one of the Karmapas. He still tries to address all of the angles and be as fair as possible. I couldn't put this book down it had so much relevant information that so far is not discussed in the others I have read. He also looks at the books already written since his was released in 2006 so it provides another look at other books and where they might disagree or agree.

He has done extensive interviews with various parties and he attempted to include others on the other side who apparently refused (or couldn't work it in their schedule) to discuss the issues. I was impressed with what "Karmapa" Trinlay Thaye Dorje had to say about this entire controversy at the end of the book. He sounds like he is level headed and certainly ready to reach out to the modern world in which he finds himself. He also is interested in talking with "Karmapa" Orgyen Trinley Rinpoche and seeing if they can resolve this issue in some reasonable way. But, in any case, Trinlay Thaye Dorje doesn't seem caught up in the "tradition" but more interested in spreading the message of Buddhism rather than the fanfare. This should be interesting to watch. But---A great book! Thanks Mr. Curren!
Ynap
So this book is troubling indeed in presenting the case for the Sharmar's pick for the current 17th Karmapa. I guess at this stage one would have to experience both Thaye Dorje and Orgyen Trinley in person in order to try to decide which one rings true to oneself. I hope to have that opportunity. Bucket list.
Mora
The author has rigorously written the book. It tells you where each piece of information or quotes comes from. It is an excellent documentation with academic values.
Marr
The Teaching (a/k/a Dharma) is of vastly greater importance than the person who transmits it, however "high" they may be.

That notion somehow shines for me through this book, although it forces me to realize that the "smell" of some transmissions may be clerical twaddle rather than IT.

Read this book if you like shining your flashlight where others think it does not belong.

Be a lamp unto yourself. Don't let the twaddle discourage you.