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Download Sex at Dawn: The Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality ePub

by Cacilda Jethá,Christopher Ryan

Download Sex at Dawn: The Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality ePub
  • ISBN 0061707805
  • ISBN13 978-0061707803
  • Language English
  • Author Cacilda Jethá,Christopher Ryan
  • Publisher Harper; 1 edition (June 29, 2010)
  • Pages 416
  • Formats lrf docx lrf mobi
  • Category Self-Help
  • Subcategory Relationships
  • Size ePub 1129 kb
  • Size Fb2 1780 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 281

Since Darwin's day, we've been told that sexual monogamy comes naturally to our species. Mainstream science--as well as religious and cultural institutions--has maintained that men and women evolved in families in which a man's possessions and protection were exchanged for a woman's fertility and fidelity. But this narrative is collapsing. Fewer and fewer couples are getting married, and divorce rates keep climbing as adultery and flagging libido drag down even seemingly solid marriages. How can reality be reconciled with the accepted narrative? It can't be, according to renegade thinkers Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jethá. While debunking almost everything we "know" about sex, they offer a bold alternative explanation in this provocative and brilliant book. Ryan and Jethá's central contention is that human beings evolved in egalitarian groups that shared food, child care, and, often, sexual partners. Weaving together convergent, frequently overlooked evidence from anthropology, archaeology, primatology, anatomy, and psychosexuality, the authors show how far from human nature monogamy really is. Human beings everywhere and in every era have confronted the same familiar, intimate situations in surprisingly different ways. The authors expose the ancient roots of human sexuality while pointing toward a more optimistic future illuminated by our innate capacities for love, cooperation, and generosity. With intelligence, humor, and wonder, Ryan and Jethá show how our promiscuous past haunts our struggles over monogamy, sexual orientation, and family dynamics. They explore why long-term fidelity can be so difficult for so many; why sexual passion tends to fade even as love deepens; why many middle-aged men risk everything for transient affairs with younger women; why homosexuality persists in the face of standard evolutionary logic; and what the human body reveals about the prehistoric origins of modern sexuality. In the tradition of the best historical and scientific writing, Sex at Dawn unapologetically upends unwarranted assumptions and unfounded conclusions while offering a revolutionary understanding of why we live and love as we do.

Ryan and Jetha have put together a very compelling argument that the standard model of pre-agricultural human sexuality is not only wrong, but dangerously so.

Ryan and Jetha have put together a very compelling argument that the standard model of pre-agricultural human sexuality is not only wrong, but dangerously so. By looking at modern foraging tribes and the way they live, as well as doing a comparative analysis of humans against our nearest ape cousins, they have come to this conclusion: our "natural" sexual state is one of promiscuity. Back in the day, communities were small and tightly bonded, and sex was one of the things that held those bonds tight.

Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha have written the essential corrective .

Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha have written the essential corrective to the evolutionary psychology literature. Sex At Dawn is the single most important book about human sexuality since Alfred Kinsey unleashed Sexual Behavior in the Human Male on the American public in 1948. Sex At Dawn has helped me understand myself and the world so much more clearly. -Ilana Glazer, co-creator of Broad City. Finally, Ryan and Jetha stake much of their argument on asserting that 99% of human being's DNA overlap with that of bonobos, the most sexually promiscuous primates.

Authors: Ryan, Christopher, Jethá, Cacilda. Evidence that two main bottleneck events shaped modern human genetic diversity. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Published online before print October 7, 2009, doi:10. Anderson, . Hessel, . and Dixson, A. F. (2004). Primate mating systems and the evolution of immune response. Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 61: 31–38. The Beauty of the Beastly: New Views of the Nature of Life. New York: Houghton Mifflin. Woman: An Intimate Geography.

Sex at Dawn: The Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality is a 2010 book about the evolution of monogamy in humans and human mating systems by Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jethá. In opposition to what the authors see as the "standard narrative" of human sexual evolution, they contend that having multiple sexual partners was common and accepted in the environment of evolutionary adaptedness.

Forget what you think you know about the origin of species. Sex at Dawn sets out to prove that our prehistoric ancestors were happy and healthy, thanks in no small part to lots of egalitarian, polyamorous, noisy group sex. What's the Big Deal? This book takes a swing at pretty much every big idea on human nature: that poverty is an inevitable consequence of life on earth, that mankind is by nature brutish, and, most important, that humans evolved to be monogamous.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha. The human history of sexuality at the dawn of civilization. Free download of Sex At DawnThe Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality by Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha.

Sex at Dawn challenges conventional wisdom about sex in a big way. By examining the prehistoric origins of human sexual behavior the authors are able to expose . Christopher Ryan, PhD, and Cacilda Jethá, MD. Epigraph. Your children are not your children. By examining the prehistoric origins of human sexual behavior the authors are able to expose the fallacies and weaknesses of standard theories proposed by most experts. This is a provocative, entertaining, and pioneering book. I learned a lot from it and recommend it highly.

The prehistoric origins at. Of modern sexuality dawn. Christopher Ryan, PhD, and Cacilda Jetha, MD. To all our relations. Preface: A Primate Meets His Match (A note from one of the authors). Introduction: Another Well-Intentioned Inquisition A Few Million Years in a Few Pages. PART I: On the Origin of the Specious CHAPTER ONE. Remember the Yucatan! You Are What You Eat. CHAPTER TWO. What Darwin Didn’t Know About Sex The Flintstonization of Prehistory. What Is Evolutionary Psychology and Why Should You Care? Lewis Henry Morgan.

Talk about Sex at Dawn: The Prehistoric Origins of Modern Sexuality


Still In Mind
Wow. I love this book. It had the power to change my mind about our shared past, social and sexual beliefs and present attempts to form a more realistic and compassionate code of ethics. Carefully researched and thoughtfully and humorously presented, I'm recommending it to everyone who is open to reading it
energy breath
Without denying the seriousness of the authors's intent, "Sex at Dawn" is one of the most entertaining books I've read in awhile. The authors, Cacilda Jetha, a medical doctor, and Christopher Ryan, a psychologist, argue that human beings are not inherently monogamous and that our collective civilizational effort to shoehorn people into life-long pair-bonds goes against our biological heritage and has led to much unnecessary misery. They stake this claim on a considerable amount of reading into recent anthropological, primatological and genetic research; specifically, they say that, as humans share roughly 99% of their DNA with chimps and bonobos, and as neither of those species practices monogamy (and in fact no primate, except the gibbon, does), our own genetic inheritance tends towards polyamory. In fact, they trot out examples from such indigenous cultures as the Mosuo in China to argue that pre-historic humans were most likely not monogamous: widespread promiscuity promoted bonding among members of extended hunter-gatherer clans, reduced inter-group tension, and promoted sperm competition as females had sex with multiple male partners and rival sperm competed for the right to fertilization.

It's not hard to understand why "Sex at Dawn" has been embraced by sexologists while primatologists and anthropologists have been noticeably cooler in their reception.The book is like a bomb thrown not only against the very notion of monogamy but also against the standard narrative in anthropology that pair-bonding is universal in human societies because women trade sexual access for food and protection. The authors make little effort to conceal their impatience and irritation with this 'standard narrative' and, indeed, much of "Sex at Dawn" reads as though it were written by an exasperated zealot (or over-ambitious grad student) who can't fathom why everyone else remains so in the dark. At the very least, it's not boring.

But the book should probably be taken with more than a few grains of salt. First of all, "Sex at Dawn" rehashes an already well-worn Enlightenment-era belief in the uninhibited 'noble savage,' uncorrupted by the restraints of civilization. Rousseau was, of course, a proponent of this and Diderot's "Supplement to the Voyages of Bougainville" pretty much encapsulates Ryan and Jetha, albeit with more wit. As others have pointed out, there are instances of monogamous indigenous peoples too that the authors don't really consider. Also, they don't really respond to one of their central theses: if the adoption of agriculture was such a disaster (sexually and in terms of quality of life) for human beings, why did they persist with it? If agricultural village settlements forced human beings into a monogamous corset, why then did they persist with it for 6,000 years before the advent of the first civilizations?

Finally, Ryan and Jetha stake much of their argument on asserting that 99% of human being's DNA overlap with that of bonobos, the most sexually promiscuous primates. Yet, we share the same percentage (99%) with chimps who are more territorial, aggressive, and somewhat less promiscuous than bonobos. Essentially, by privileging bonobos Ryan and Jetha over-correct previous writers's (like Jared Diamond) tendency to focus on our chimp heritage: we really need a book that tries to relate both our chimp and bonobo genetic backgrounds together.

Still, for a book so steeped in academic research, it's a blast to read, except when the authors start to consider the implications of their own argument. Having spent 300 pages explaining how monogamy is so unnatural and sexual exclusivity is probably the main cause of marital failure (in their view), they then shy away from any prescriptive advice. They don't quite want to push marriage over a cliff and advocate polyamory (for males, anyway; they're even more reticent interestingly enough on the implications of their argument for female behavior) but the logic of the book tends in that direction. But, as Freud argued, we are stuck with civilization and its neuroses whether we like them or not. Thus, they can't quite advocate free love (not as long as we have private property, anyway) but they insist that marriage is a botch too. For all its strident confidence in our biologically-driven amorality, "Sex at Dawn" ends by waffling all over the place.

I did love reading it, however, even when I recognized that the authors were pushing their case too far. At the very least, it gets you thinking about why so many marriages and pairings fail, why cheating is so rampant, and whether there is indeed an evolutionary legacy that is inimical to our social arrangements (rather than just instances of individual moral failure).
Watikalate
A very interesting read! I wasn't sure what to expect after hearing about this book on the radio, but something told me I would enjoy it - and I definitely did. The first two thirds of the book focused primarily on history, past studies and how people felt about sex (or sexuality) and mating. The last third pulled all this information together and compared it to how we feel today, in our recent past, and how we may feel about it in the future. In my opinion the author never pushed his own agenda or feelings about how one should feel about sex, but instead presented different interpretations and views to help the reader do their own thinking. Once I finished the book I didn't feel like I was just told what to think, but simply had a lot more to think about.
Kann
Incredible to discover the answers to so many questions (and wrong assumptions) we’ve all had about human sexuality and fascinating to see the pains we’ve gone to as a species to control that same sexuality. Especially eye opening (as a man) to learn about the suppression strategies employed by society to desexualize women. Say good bye to shame and ignorance and say hello to greater understanding, wisdom, and compassion for the sexual needs and well being of yourself and others.
Xarcondre
While the book presented some interesting scientific and historical research and factoids, it felt incomplete and slanted by challenging others rather than presenting the theory in an objective way. In proving that humans are biologically non-monogamous, it seemed more geared towards the male species and how they are wired with some smattering of information about women.

Esther Perel has touched upon the gender differences while noting that statistically men and women are as likely to cheat. The authors reference her in some aspects but as with the rest of the book, it seems to cherry pick rather than be more thorough in presenting their findings.

While the authors added a note to address why they provided an anecdote of Phil only, it seemed lazy to do so by not looking for some anecdotes or analysis of women's sex drives and motivations, even if complicated, and breaking down such complexities to also note whether women are as biologically wired to be non-monogamous as well.
JoldGold
To the Authors: Thank you for researching, compiling, and writing this book.

To those thinking of reading it: Do it. The book is dense. It is full of citations, quotes from studies, and anthropological research, though quite fun once you get into the rhythm and style of it. What's truly awesome is what the research and data reveal about human sexuality. There's more to us than the stories told in Disney movies, religious texts, and fairy tales (and far more importantly to me, it successfully challenges the standard model of sexual human behavior held up by most scientists). I'd read a chapter a night, or several on a flight, and then spend the next day sporadically realizing why something in a past relationship happened, or why I have always felt a certain way about myself or the wonderful women in my life. The book has made me grateful, more mature, and more comfortable in my own skin and emotions.

Worth it.