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Download The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy) ePub

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche,Anthony M. Ludovici

Download The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy) ePub
  • ISBN 1573928321
  • ISBN13 978-1573928328
  • Language English
  • Author Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche,Anthony M. Ludovici
  • Publisher Prometheus Books (November 1, 2000)
  • Pages 111
  • Formats lrf docx lrf rtf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Philosophy
  • Size ePub 1425 kb
  • Size Fb2 1256 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 351

A work of Nietzsche's later years, The Antichrist was written after Thus Spoke Zarathustra and shortly before the mental collapse that incapacitated him for the rest of his life. The work is both an unrestrained attack on Christianity and a further exposition of Nietzsche's will-to-power philosophy so dramatically presented in Zarathustra.Christianity, says Nietzsche, represents "everything weak, low, and botched; it has made an ideal out of antagonism towards all the self-preservative instincts of strong life." By contrast, Nietzsche defines good as: "All that enhances the feeling of power, the Will to Power, and power itself in man. What is bad? -- All that proceeds from weakness. What is happiness? -- The feeling that power is increasing, that resistance has been overcome."In attempting to redefine the basis of Western values by demolishing the formative influence of the Judeo-Christian tradition, The Antichrist has proved to be highly controversial and continuously stimulating to later generations of philosophers.

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (Author), Anthony M. Ludovici (Translator). FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE was born on October 15, 1844, to the family of a Protestant minister in the town of Röcken, which is located in the Saxony-Anhalt region of what is now eastern Germany.

by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (Author), Anthony M. After studing philosophy in Bonn and Leipzig, Nietzsche became a professor at the University of Basel, Switzerland, in 1869. Later he opted to become a Swiss citizen. While working in Switzerland, he published his first book, a literary work titled The Birth of Tragedy from the Spirit of Music.

The Antichrist (German: Der Antichrist) is a book by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, originally published in 1895. Although it was written in 1888, its controversial content made Franz Overbeck and Heinrich Köselitz delay its publication, along. Although it was written in 1888, its controversial content made Franz Overbeck and Heinrich Köselitz delay its publication, along with Ecce Homo. The German title can be translated into English as either The Anti-Christ or The Anti-Christian, depending on how the German word Christ is translated.

Study The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy) discussion and chapter questions and find The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy) study . Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche. Get started today for free.

Study The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy) discussion and chapter questions and find The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy) study guide questions and answers. By College By High School By Country.

Philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. Friedrich Nietzsche developed his philosophy during the late 19th century. Friedrich Nietzsche developed his philosophy during the late 19th century

Of all Nietzsche’s books, The Antichrist comes nearest to conventionality in form. There are two earlier translations, one by Thomas Common and the other by Anthony M. Ludovici.

Of all Nietzsche’s books, The Antichrist comes nearest to conventionality in form. It presents a connected argument with very few interludes, and has a beginning, a middle and an end. Most of his works are in the form of collections of apothegms, and sometimes the subject changes on every second page. That of Mr. Common follows the text very closely, and thus occasionally shows some essentially German turns of phrase; that of Mr. Ludovici is more fluent but rather less exact.

World's Greatest Classics in One Volume.

Friedrich Nietzsche's essay "The Antichrist" is regarded by many as one of the greatest critiques of Christianity and morality. The Antichrist" seethes with hard criticism, rhetoric and insults that would make some readers shy away. Nietzsche's writing is fast, to the point, striking and filled with cynicism. World's Greatest Classics in One Volume.

Nietzsche's first book, The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music (1872), was a radical reinterpretation .

Nietzsche's first book, The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music (1872), was a radical reinterpretation of Greek art and culture from a Schopenhaurian and Wagnerian standpoint. By 1874 Nietzsche had to retire from his university post for reasons of health. He attacked the entire metaphysical tradition in Western philosophy, especially Christianity and Christian morality, which he thought had reached its final and most decadent form in modern scientific humanism, with its ideals of liberalism and democracy.

Of all Nietzsche's books, "The Antichrist" comes nearest t.

Of all Nietzsche's books, "The Antichrist" comes nearest to. conventionality in form.

Popular books in Philosophy, Religion. An interesting book, much too well translated into English. Written at the end of Nietzsche's life, it's a summary of his philosophy of the superior man. The Art of War. Samlede Værker, Tredie Bind. He was trying to do to philosophy what Darwin did to biology-remove god and all invisible delusions from philosophical thought. And, like most non-biologists, he completely misunderstood Darwin. He believed that the superior man would rise above the rabble of men because of his innate abilities.

Contents1 Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher2 Nietzsche : God is dead & nihilism3 Nietzsche, metaphysics and . He made a study at different levels and in so doing has often announced with great precision which only sketched in the late nineteenth century.

Contents1 Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher2 Nietzsche : God is dead & nihilism3 Nietzsche, metaphysics and morality:4 Nietzsche and the Will to Power:5 Th. This deadly disease of modern times, ours is the nihilism, reign of the absurd, of Nothing ( nihil, as we pointed out the etymology). Nihilism or no sense.

Talk about The Antichrist (Great Books in Philosophy)


lolike
It was interesting, and sort of a fun read. Much of what was posited here was sort of blown out of the water by Barth, Schweitzer, and now N.T. Wright. Nietzsche simply didn't have access to the incredible amount of research and literature his successors would have.
It's a bummer, but you can see a lot of the bitterness manifested in his writing naturally stemming from his distaste toward life, and Lutheranism in particular, since his father was a pastor. His Dad died when he was twelve, and was left to live with women the rest of his life (from his family). He contracted syphilis, had a woman he loved leave him for his friend, he could barely see and lived through much physical agony. His life was kind of sucky, to be honest. I can see why he'd want to take it out on Christianity, the idea of compassion, and so forth.
Props to his originality, but his positions on Christ are outdated and easily pulled apart in light of the riveting amount of revealing New Testament studies that took place following WW1 into WW2, culminating with Barth.
Shalinrad
I don't need to comment on the content of this book, because everyone knows it's a work of a genius.

This translation is by far my favorite. Kaufman annoys me with his bias and unnecessary notes he leaves in his translations (Like how in The Gay Science he asserts that Nietzsche merely disliked Luther because of the fact that he was German, whereas if you actually read the full quote from Nietzsche he makes it clear that he doesn't like Luther because he feels that Luther didn't rebel against the church, he reinstated it.)and I didn't much care for the Penguin Classics translation.

Here's a quote from the Penguin Classics translation:

"the Christian Church, in contrast to the 'nation of saints', renounces all claim to originality. For precisely this reason the Jews are the most fateful nation in world history; their after-effect has falsified mankind to such an extent that today the Christian is able to feel anti-Jewish without realizing he is the ultimate consequence of the Jews."

Now, let's take a look at that same quote from this translation:

"the Christian Church as compared with the "chosen people," lacks all claim to originality. Precisely on this account the Jews are the most fatal people in the history of the world: their ultimate influence has falsified mankind to such an extent that even to this day the Christian can be anti-Semitic in spirit, without comprehending that he himself is the final consequence of Judaism."

That sets the tone for both of the books, as you can see, this translation of Nietzsche's work flows much more smoothly than the other.
Orll
I have just finished reading Friedrich Nietzsche's "The Antichrist: A Criticism of Christianity". The theme of this book or perhaps extended essay is the criticism and/or condemnation of the Christian faith. I must admit I am surprised how many of Nietzsche's points are still very relevant today despite the fact this book was written 1888. I will address the former statement in a moment.

I viewed this book more as critique, than some written abomination that should never see the light of day. I should state I am more of a spiritual person than a religious one, so I wasn't offended by Nietzsche's views. So for all you Christians out there before you become upset with this book just remember it is a man's opinion and everyone is entitled to have one.

As I noted prior, many points presented in "The Antichrist" are still very relevant today. For instance, it speaks about how Christianity uses sin as a propaganda tool. Therefore followers of faith (Nietzsche states that faith is an "incurable falsity" because to shut one's eyes in order to avoid any suffering is ludicrous) must live their lives based on fear of breaking a sin. This then leads into stating that some "so called sins" are part of the human experience and allows a person to grow and learn. Christianity cripples this life experience. This is just the tip of the iceberg as far as Nietzsche's ideas go.

Another idea I liked presented in this book was how Christianity promotes fundamental thinking, seeing things only in black and white. I believe this same notion can be transferred to politics. Nietzsche doesn't just spit off his opinion he does reference quotes and passages from the Bible. When he presents these quotes and then his views a strong argument is created. This makes the content in this book philosophy not just a glorified opinion.

Although I respect Nietzsche critical presentation, I don't agree with all of it. Some of his notions went totally over my head. In addition to state that every person who practices Christianity is a warped individual is equivalent to every person who does practice Christianity has a heart of gold. On a final note, Nietzsche's father was a Lutheran pastor who died when Nietzsche was only four years old. It states in the introduction of this book that a bit of a void was left for Nietzsche after his father died. Perhaps this early experience might have been the foundation for his disgust towards religion. Which leaves us with the inquiry, aren't we all products of our environment?