derrierloisirs.fr
» » The Illusion of the End

Download The Illusion of the End ePub

Download The Illusion of the End ePub
  • ISBN 0745612210
  • ISBN13 978-0745612218
  • Language English
  • Publisher Unknown
  • Formats txt docx lit mbr
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Philosophy
  • Size ePub 1913 kb
  • Size Fb2 1946 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 514

The year 2000, the end of the millennium: is this anything other than a mirage, the illusion of an end, like so many other imaginary endpoints which have littered the path of history? In this remarkable book Jean Baurdrillard―France's leading theorist of postmodernity―argues that the notion of the end is part of the fantasy of a linear history. Today we are not approaching the end of history but moving into reverse, into a process of systematic obliteration. We are wiping out the entire twentieth century, effacing all signs of the cold War one by one, perhaps even the signs of the First and Second World Wars and of the political and ideological revolutions of our time. In short, we are engaged in a gigantic process of historical revisionism, and we seem in a hurry to finish it before the end of the century, secretly hoping perhaps to be able to begin again from scratch. Baudrillard explores the "fatal strategies of time" which shape our ways of thinking about history and its imaginary end. Ranging from the revolutions in Eastern Europe to the Gulf War, from the transformation of nature to the hyper-reality of the media, this postmodern mediation on modernity and its aftermath will be widely read.

The year 2000, the end of the millennium: is this anything other than a mirage, the illusion of an end, like so many other imaginary endpoints which have littered the path of history? In this remarkable book Jean.

The year 2000, the end of the millennium: is this anything other than a mirage, the illusion of an end, like so many other imaginary endpoints which have littered the path of history? In this remarkable book Jean s leading theorist of that the notion of the end is part of the fantasy of a linear history. Today we are not approaching The year 2000, the end of the millennium: is this anything other than a mirage, the illusion of an end, like so many other imaginary endpoints which have littered the path of history?

The year 2000, the end of the millennium: is this anything other than a mirage, the illusion of an end . Today we are not approaching the end of history but moving into reverse, into a process of systematic obliteration

Each chapter of Empire of Illusion makes a strong case for how different illusions. Although much of the book is chilling and depressing, Hedges does end the book with some semblance of hope. 3 people found this helpful.

Each chapter of Empire of Illusion makes a strong case for how different illusions. taken together are destroying the American mind, culture and the nation itself.

A prescient book that forecast the culture that gave rise to Trump - a society beholden to empty spectacle and obsession with image at the expense of reality, reason, and truth

A prescient book that forecast the culture that gave rise to Trump - a society beholden to empty spectacle and obsession with image at the expense of reality, reason, and truth. An instant bestseller, Empire of Illusion is a striking and unsettling exploration of illusion and fantasy in contemporary American culture. Traveling to the ringside of professional wrestling bouts at Madison Square Garden, to Las Vegas to write about the pornographic film industry, and to academic conferences held by positive psychologists who claim to be able to engineer happiness, Hedges chronicles our flight from.

In his analysis of the deep social trends rooted in production, consumption, and the symbolic, Jean Baudrillard touches the very heart of the concerns of the generation currently rebelling against the framework of the consumer society. The Spirit of Terrorism and Other essays. by Jean Baudrillard · Chris Turner. Baudrillard sees the power of the terrorists as lying in the symbolism of slaughter - not merely the reality of death, but in a sacrifice that challenges the whole system.

The year 2000, the end of the millennium: is this anything other than a mirage, the illusion of an en. I purchased this book as a part of the required reading for a course I am taking in Post-Modern philosophy - although we only read specific passages, this book offers some of Baudrillard's most often discussed ideas.

The end-of-history illusion is a psychological illusion in which individuals of all ages believe that they have experienced significant personal growth and changes in tastes up to the present moment.

The end-of-history illusion is a psychological illusion in which individuals of all ages believe that they have experienced significant personal growth and changes in tastes up to the present moment, but will not substantially grow or mature in the future. Despite recognizing that their perceptions have evolved, individuals predict that their perceptions will remain roughly the same in the future.

Time and time again, we've failed to predict that the technologies of the present will change the future. Recently, a similar pattern was discovered in our individual lives: we're unable to predict change in ourselves. But is there anything wrong with assuming that who we are now is who we will continue to be? Bence Nanay details the consequences of seeing ourselves as finished products.

The book of. Illusions. Man has not one and the same life. Double or Nothing, the last of the twelve two-reel comedies he made at the end of the silent era, was released on November 23, 1928. He has many lives, placed end to end, and that is the cause of his misery. The book of illusions. Two months later, without saying good-bye to any of his friends or associates, without leaving behind a letter or informing anyone of his plans, he walked out of his rented house on North Orange Drive and was never seen again.

Talk about The Illusion of the End


Skillet
I purchased this book as a part of the required reading for a course I am taking in Post-Modern philosophy - although we only read specific passages, this book offers some of Baudrillard's most often discussed ideas.
Quphagie
Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007) was a French philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer most associated with the “Postmodern” movement.

He wrote in the first chapter of this 1992 book, “one might suppose that the acceleration of modernity, of technology, events and media, of all exchanges---economic, political and sexual---has propelled us to ‘escape velocity,’ with the result that we have flow free of the referential sphere of the real and of history. We are ‘liberated’ in every sense of the term, so liberated that we have taken leave of a certain space-time, passed beyond a certain horizon in which the real is possible because gravitation is still strong enough for things to be reflected and thus in some way to endure and have some consequence.” (Pg. 1)

He continues, “We are still speaking of a point of disappearance, a vanishing point, but this time in music. I shall call this the stereophonic effect. We are all obsessed with high fidelity, with the quality of musical ‘reproduction’. At the consoles of our stereos, armed with out tuners, amplifiers and speakers, we mix, adjust settings, multiply tracks in pursuit of a flawless sound. Is this still music? Where is the high fidelity threshold beyond which music disappears as such? It does not disappear for lack of music, but because it has passed this limit point; it disappears into the perfection of its materiality, into its own special effect. Beyond this point, there is neither judgment nor aesthetic pleasure. It is the ecstasy of musicality, and its end. The disappearance of history is of the same order: here again, we have passed that limit where, by dint of the sophistication of events and information, history ceases to exist as such.” (Pg. 5)

In the chapter ‘The Event Strike,’ he says, “The prodigious event, the event which is measured neither by its causes nor its consequences but creates its own stage and its own dramatic effect, no longer exists. History has gradually narrowed down to the field of its probable causes and effects, and, even more recently, to the field of current events---its effects in ‘real time.’ Events now have no more significance than their anticipated meaning, their programming and their broadcasting. Only THIS EVENT STRIKE constitutes a true historical phenomenon---this refusal to signify anything whatever, or this capacity to signify anything at all. This is the true end of history, the end of historical Reason.” (Pg. 21-22)

He points out, “Instead of the eastern bloc countries accelerating towards modern democracy, perhaps we are going to drift in the other direction, moving back beyond democracy and falling into the hole of the past. It would be the opposite of Orwell’s prediction (strangely, he has not been mentioned of late, though the collapse of Big Brother ought to have been celebrated for the record, if only for the irony of the date Orwell set for the onset of totalitarianism which turned out to be roughly that of its collapse.” (Pg. 43)

He continues, “Something tells us that what we have here is not a historical evolution, but an EPIDEMIC of consensus, an epidemic of democratic values---in other words, this is a viral effect, a triumphant effect of fashion. If democratic values spread so easily, by a capillary or communicating-vessels effect, then they must have liquefied, they must now be worthless. Throughout the modern age they were held dear and dearly bought. Today, they are being sold off at a discount and we are watching a Dutch auction of democratic values which looks very much like uncontrolled speculation. Which makes it highly probable that, as might be the case with financial speculation, these same values may crash.” (Pg. 44)

He suggests, “perhaps man, in the process of losing track of his history, is seized by a nostalgia for societies without history, perhaps obscurely sensing that he is returning to the same point. All these relics which we call upon to bear witness to our origin would then become the involuntary signs of its loss.” (Pg. 74)

He argues in the ‘Immortality’ chapter, “But we want this immortality here and now, this real-time afterlife, without having resolved the problem of the end. For there is no real-time end, no real time of death. This is an absurdity. The end is always experienced after it has actually happened, in its symbolic elaboration. It follows from this that real-time immortality is itself an ABSURDITY… For, at bottom, nothing takes place in real time. Not even history. History in real time is CNN, instant news, which is the exact opposite of history. But this is precisely our fantasy of passing beyond the end, of emancipating ourselves from time.” (Pg. 90)

He goes on, “So long as there is a finalistic conception of life and death, the soul, the afterlife and immortality are given, like the world, and there is no cause to believe in them. Do you believe in reality? No, of course not: it exists but we do not believe in it. It is like God. Do you believe in God? No, of course not: God exists, but I don’t believe in him. To wager that God exists and to believe in him---or that he doesn’t exist and not to believe in him---is of such banality as almost to make us doubt the question, while the two propositions ‘ God exists, but I don’t believe in him’ and ‘God doesn’t exist, but I believe in him’ both, paradoxically, suggest that, if God exists, there is no need to believe in him, but that if he does not exist, there is every need to believe in him. If something does not exist, you have to believe in it. Belief is not the reflection of existence, it is there for existence, just as language is not the reflection of meaning, it is there in place of meaning… In fact, faith is the spiritual impulse which reveals the profoundest uncertainty about the existence of God (but it is the same with all the theological virtues: hope is the spiritual impulse which betrays the deepest despair at the real state of things and charity the spiritual impulse which betrays the deepest contempt for others.” (Pg. 91-92)

This is one of Baudrillard’s most interesting books, and will be of great interest to anyone studying him and his thought.
Hugifyn
Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007) was a French philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer most associated with the “Postmodern” movement.

He wrote in the first chapter of this 1992 book, “one might suppose that the acceleration of modernity, of technology, events and media, of all exchanges---economic, political and sexual---has propelled us to ‘escape velocity,’ with the result that we have flow free of the referential sphere of the real and of history. We are ‘liberated’ in every sense of the term, so liberated that we have taken leave of a certain space-time, passed beyond a certain horizon in which the real is possible because gravitation is still strong enough for things to be reflected and thus in some way to endure and have some consequence.” (Pg. 1)

He continues, “We are still speaking of a point of disappearance, a vanishing point, but this time in music. I shall call this the stereophonic effect. We are all obsessed with high fidelity, with the quality of musical ‘reproduction’. At the consoles of our stereos, armed with out tuners, amplifiers and speakers, we mix, adjust settings, multiply tracks in pursuit of a flawless sound. Is this still music? Where is the high fidelity threshold beyond which music disappears as such? It does not disappear for lack of music, but because it has passed this limit point; it disappears into the perfection of its materiality, into its own special effect. Beyond this point, there is neither judgment nor aesthetic pleasure. It is the ecstasy of musicality, and its end. The disappearance of history is of the same order: here again, we have passed that limit where, by dint of the sophistication of events and information, history ceases to exist as such.” (Pg. 5)

In the chapter ‘The Event Strike,’ he says, “The prodigious event, the event which is measured neither by its causes nor its consequences but creates its own stage and its own dramatic effect, no longer exists. History has gradually narrowed down to the field of its probable causes and effects, and, even more recently, to the field of current events---its effects in ‘real time.’ Events now have no more significance than their anticipated meaning, their programming and their broadcasting. Only THIS EVENT STRIKE constitutes a true historical phenomenon---this refusal to signify anything whatever, or this capacity to signify anything at all. This is the true end of history, the end of historical Reason.” (Pg. 21-22)

He points out, “Instead of the eastern bloc countries accelerating towards modern democracy, perhaps we are going to drift in the other direction, moving back beyond democracy and falling into the hole of the past. It would be the opposite of Orwell’s prediction (strangely, he has not been mentioned of late, though the collapse of Big Brother ought to have been celebrated for the record, if only for the irony of the date Orwell set for the onset of totalitarianism which turned out to be roughly that of its collapse.” (Pg. 43)

He continues, “Something tells us that what we have here is not a historical evolution, but an EPIDEMIC of consensus, an epidemic of democratic values---in other words, this is a viral effect, a triumphant effect of fashion. If democratic values spread so easily, by a capillary or communicating-vessels effect, then they must have liquefied, they must now be worthless. Throughout the modern age they were held dear and dearly bought. Today, they are being sold off at a discount and we are watching a Dutch auction of democratic values which looks very much like uncontrolled speculation. Which makes it highly probable that, as might be the case with financial speculation, these same values may crash.” (Pg. 44)

He suggests, “perhaps man, in the process of losing track of his history, is seized by a nostalgia for societies without history, perhaps obscurely sensing that he is returning to the same point. All these relics which we call upon to bear witness to our origin would then become the involuntary signs of its loss.” (Pg. 74)

He argues in the ‘Immortality’ chapter, “But we want this immortality here and now, this real-time afterlife, without having resolved the problem of the end. For there is no real-time end, no real time of death. This is an absurdity. The end is always experienced after it has actually happened, in its symbolic elaboration. It follows from this that real-time immortality is itself an ABSURDITY… For, at bottom, nothing takes place in real time. Not even history. History in real time is CNN, instant news, which is the exact opposite of history. But this is precisely our fantasy of passing beyond the end, of emancipating ourselves from time.” (Pg. 90)

He goes on, “So long as there is a finalistic conception of life and death, the soul, the afterlife and immortality are given, like the world, and there is no cause to believe in them. Do you believe in reality? No, of course not: it exists but we do not believe in it. It is like God. Do you believe in God? No, of course not: God exists, but I don’t believe in him. To wager that God exists and to believe in him---or that he doesn’t exist and not to believe in him---is of such banality as almost to make us doubt the question, while the two propositions ‘ God exists, but I don’t believe in him’ and ‘God doesn’t exist, but I believe in him’ both, paradoxically, suggest that, if God exists, there is no need to believe in him, but that if he does not exist, there is every need to believe in him. If something does not exist, you have to believe in it. Belief is not the reflection of existence, it is there for existence, just as language is not the reflection of meaning, it is there in place of meaning… In fact, faith is the spiritual impulse which reveals the profoundest uncertainty about the existence of God (but it is the same with all the theological virtues: hope is the spiritual impulse which betrays the deepest despair at the real state of things and charity the spiritual impulse which betrays the deepest contempt for others.” (Pg. 91-92)

This is one of Baudrillard’s most interesting books, and will be of great interest to anyone studying him and his thought.