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Download Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher ePub

by Nicholas Fearn

Download Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher ePub
  • ISBN 0871138476
  • ISBN13 978-0871138477
  • Language English
  • Author Nicholas Fearn
  • Publisher Atlantic Monthly Pr (May 2002)
  • Formats mbr mobi azw docx
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Philosophy
  • Size ePub 1320 kb
  • Size Fb2 1183 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 897


It doesn't really teach you how to think like a philosopher, but it still entertains and enlightens. Zeno's parable argues that no matter how fast Achilles runs he can never overtake the tortoise as he must first draw level with it. An interesting thought.

It doesn't really teach you how to think like a philosopher, but it still entertains and enlightens. 3 people found this helpful.

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Nicholas Fearn displays a healthy impatience with the complications of philosophy in Zeno and the Tortoise, says .

Nicholas Fearn displays a healthy impatience with the complications of philosophy in Zeno and the Tortoise, says Nicholas Lezard. But what makes this book most trustworthy is the way Fearn does not overstate the case for his subject, and bears in mind the words and precepts of Wittgenstein, which put philosophy into perspective, and also tie up neatly with Socrates' assertion that he was the most ignorant of men. "Philosophy leaves everything as it is," said Wittgenstein, and even if Fearn doesn't quote that exact remark, he still cites enough by him which is in that vein.

Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher. Zeno and the Tortoise - Nicholas Fearn

Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher. Zeno and the Tortoise - Nicholas Fearn. The most enduring contributions of the great philosophers are the thinking tools, methods and approaches they invent or discover, which often outlive the theories and systems they construct or those that they use their tools to dismantle. This book attempts to take the reader from the earliest examples forged by the ancients through to some of the ‘state of the art’ equipment employed by today’s professional philosophers.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher. For those who don’t know the difference between Lucretius’s spear and Hume’s fork, Zeno and the Tortoise explains not just who each philosopher was and what he thought, but exactly how he came to think in the way he did.

Adam Carter browses through Nicholas Fearn’s introduction to philosophy .

Adam Carter browses through Nicholas Fearn’s introduction to philosophy for bartenders who wear baseball caps. With a grade-school like reptile on the cover, Zeno and the Tortoise is not for the PhDs and third-year grad students.

Think of Zeno and the Tortoise as a toolbox for aspiring thinkers. Recently, I picked up this marvelous text. What I like is how each chapter focuses on one philosopher and a particular "tool". For example, Fearns begins at the beginning with Thales and talks about the strengths and weaknesses of reductive explanations (Thales believed that everything was made of water).

Fearn presents philosophy as a collection of tools-the tricks of a trade that, in the end, might just be all tricks.

For those who don't know the difference between Lucretius's spear and Hume's fork, "Zeno and the Tortoise" explains not just who each philosopher was, but exactly how he came to think in the way he did. Fearn presents philosophy as a collection of tools-the tricks of a trade that, in the end, might just be all tricks. 6 people like this topic.

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Talk about Zeno and the Tortoise: How to Think Like a Philosopher


Bys
Fun, quirky, and interesting. Each chapter is about a specific philosopher, their ideas, and their backstory. It doesn't really teach you how to think like a philosopher, but it still entertains and enlightens.
Gri
This is a marvelous text. Each chapter focuses on one philosopher and a particular philosophical "tool". For example, Fearns begins at the beginning with Thales and talks about the strengths and weaknesses of reductive explanations (Thales believed that everything was made of water). He proceeds on to Protagoras and relativism and on through Descartes (famous for discovering that he couldn't doubt that he was doubting - i.e., thinking) to Wittgenstein (the best brief introductions I've read to both the "early" and "later" Wittgenstein). Other important philosophers considered are Nietzsche, Kant, Derrida, Ryle, and so on.

The aim of the book is to get you to think like a philosopher and not get bogged down in history or arcane debates. It accomplishes this in a splendid fashion and is suitable introduction to philosophy for any thoughtful person.
Delan
i was lost in an enlightenment philosophy class, having fallen WAY behind due to some life circumstances, and then I accidentally found this book here, at Amazon, while searching for a completely different text. Wow! It presents complex theories and ideas in simple, even humorous and witty ways, and you totally can then grasp the jist of what you needed to learn about a specific thinker, and much more comfortably move on to the more difficult standard college texts. What an awesome resource, especially for those unfamiliar with philosophy! thanks Amazon!
LoboThommy
Good book. Used it in philosophy class.
Fordg
I really enjoyed reading this book and if the topic of philosophy and thinking is of interest but seems somewhat impenetrable, this could be a book you'd enjoy.

The book is divided into 25 brief chapters each covering a major philosopher and their ideas. I was initially attracted by the intriguing title and the accessible format of the book. Each chapter is limited to around half a dozen pages which immediately creates confidence that even if you felt you were drowning, the far bank is close at hand. Add to this Nicholas Fearn's style and approach and you have an entertaining and engaging read and actually learn something of philosophy.

The danger with any book on this topic is that philosophy can feel somewhat distant and crusty. To counter this within each chapter the relevance of each idea and the desire to read on is established by setting the idea in a modern situation. For example the chapter on Plato's thinking relates this to the anti-trust law suit brought against Microsoft for including an internet browser within Windows and the thinking of Protagoras is related to the efforts of Sting to help the Kayapo Indians of the Amazon. Each chapter provides background to the philosopher's life and those ideas and other thinkers that influenced and sometimes competed with them.

The book provides a roughly chronological view of some of the key thinkers who have made a significant contribution to the development of understanding and links their work to the social, technical and other changes that have accompanied the advances, It includes one or two interesting modern names that I hadn't thought of as philosophers which further helps break down the barriers between philosophy as a subject and its application in our everyday lives. For example Alan Turing the computing pioneer who played a key role in breaking the German Enigma codes is included for his thinking on consciousness.

If philosophy is one of those topics that you would like to know a little more about but never quite get around to this could be what you need. It an educational and fun read and I suspect that can't be said for many books on the topic.

Incidentally the book title is taken from the paradox described by Zeno of a race between Achilles and a tortoise. The tortoise is given a 10 yard head start and in the time taken by Achilles to cover these ten yards the tortoise advances a further yard. Achilles advances this further yard and in the time it takes the tortoise advances three inches. Achilles now covers this three inches but in this time the tortoise advances a further inch. As Achilles advances this one inch the tortoise again moves some albeit small distance forwards. Zeno's parable argues that no matter how fast Achilles runs he can never overtake the tortoise as he must first draw level with it. An interesting thought.
Funky
It has some well-written passages about the philosophers, but reducing them to a tool or condensing them into such a small space is misleading. Philosophy is more of a way of looking at things than reaching into a toolbox. It, in the end, puts philosophy in deceivingly simplistic terms. I would recommend it for someone burnt out on long, involved philosophic tracts or a beginner.
Mightdragon
I'm only beginning to get into philosophy.

Overall I'm finding the book to be a good introduction into a number of philosophers basic ideas; however, there are several passages which are incomprehensible. One occurs on page 13 and I blame the author for this one, he could have rewrote it. The chapter on Descartes is unreadable, but I'll assume Descartes may just be too tough for me.

Kenneth Kloby