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Download Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention May to September 1787 ePub

by Bowen,Catherine Drinker,Underwood,Kristen (Narrator)

Download Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention May to September 1787 ePub
  • ISBN 1433254174
  • ISBN13 978-1433254178
  • Language English
  • Author Bowen,Catherine Drinker,Underwood,Kristen (Narrator)
  • Publisher Blackstone Audiobooks, Inc.; Unabridged Library edition (September 1, 2008)
  • Formats docx mobi mbr lrf
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1560 kb
  • Size Fb2 1944 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 713

This is the story of the stormy, brilliant session of 1787 in Philadelphia which saw the birth of the Constitution of the United States. Looked at straight from the records, the Federal Convention is startlingly fresh and new.

Bowen, Catherine Drinker, 1897-1973. Constitutional Convention (1787). cut-off text inherent from the book on leaf 162.

Bowen, Catherine Drinker, 1897-1973. London : H. Hamilton. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Bookplateleaf. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Miracle at Philadelphia book.

Catherine Drinker Bowen (1897-1973) was one of the most prominent .

Catherine Drinker Bowen (1897-1973) was one of the most prominent practitioners in the field of literary biography. Her two best-known works, John Adams and the American Revolution and Yankee from Olympus, have been praised as faithful and sympathetic portraits of distinguished Americans. Miracle at Philadelphia" is one of the many books I have read about the American Revolution as I revere the subject; and for me, it stands at the top of a list of excellent writings about the forming of our Nation

Catherine Drinker Bowen s classic history of the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in 1787, that . Miracle at Philadelphia - far from being a "young adult" book - is one book which should be on everyone's top ten reading list

Catherine Drinker Bowen s classic history of the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in 1787, that produced the Constitution of the United States. Miracle at Philadelphia - far from being a "young adult" book - is one book which should be on everyone's top ten reading list. The story of what eventually became the Constitutional Convention, although not starting out as such, the book gives unique insight into the men and the minds that framed our Constitution, the first such written document in the world.

Miracle At Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention is a work of historical non-fiction, written by Catherine Drinker Bowen and originally published in 1966. Bowen recounts the Philadelphia Convention, a meeting in 1787 that created the United States Constitution. Bowen draws much of her information from notes and journals of the Framers, especially James Madison.

Looked at straight from the records, the Federal Convention is startlingly fresh and new, and Mrs. Bowen evokes it as if the reader were actually there, mingling with the delegates, hearing their arguments, witnessing a dramatic moment in history. Here is the fascinating record of the hot, sultry summer months of debate and decision when ideas clashed and tempers flared.

Catherine Drinker Bowen; Kristen Underwood. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention, May to September 1787 (Audiobook). Catherine Drinker Bowen; Kristen Underwood. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12. Qty

However, this miracle had substantial origins, Catherine Drinker Bowen tells us in "Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention - May to September 1787.

However, this miracle had substantial origins, Catherine Drinker Bowen tells us in "Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention - May to September 1787. Prior efforts at self government had been ongoing since the earliest settlements in the early decades of the 17th century.

A history of the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in 1787 that produced the . Summary: A history of the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in 1787 that produced the Constitution of the .

A history of the Federal Convention at Philadelphia in 1787 that produced the Constitution of the . - Constitutional Convention - (1787). Constitutional conventions - United States. United States - Constitutional Convention - (1787).

Talk about Miracle at Philadelphia: The Story of the Constitutional Convention May to September 1787


Thetalas
This is one of the finest books written about the Federal Convention; that critical pivot point in our history where educated delegates of strong convictions argued heatedly at times but in the end worked together to bring forth a framework by which the young colony-states could shape themselves and give birth to a nation.
The weak and timid one-star or two-star reviews are evidence of the immense intellectual decline since 1787 as we move toward idiocracy and cognitive laziness. If you can't "get into" this book, you should not be allowed to vote.
Nilador
"... assembly of demi-gods"... (Thomas Jefferson, in his remarks about the quality of persons attending the Federal Convention - pg 4)

"Miracle at Philadelphia" is one of the many books I have read about the American Revolution as I revere the subject; and for me, it stands at the top of a list of excellent writings about the forming of our Nation. Not only is Catherine Drinker Bowen's accounting eloquent and logical, she manages to take us there as if by magic; we "feel" the humid air, the possibility of disease lurking around every corner, the lack of sanitation, the torment of mosquitoes that emerge at night unabated during that long hot summer of debate over the Constitution - the Great Experiment unfolding it's wings.

A passage from the first paragraph of this remarkable book:

<<<<"Over Philadelphia, the air lay hot and humid; old people said it was the worst summer since 1750. French visitors wrote home that they could not breathe. 'At each inhaling of air, one worries about the next one. The slightest movement is painful.' ">>

Jefferson's unusual statement about the demigods was, as were most of his observations, astute in the moment. Truly it was a gathering of the finest minds available anywhere in the world, all collected at precisely the same time, with preservation of the new-found, hard won freedom uppermost in the psyche of all of them; determined to form as perfect a document of government as could be agreed upon;, along with a separate bill of rights, and the "miracle at Philadelphia" did come to pass. It was not without pain, flaws and disappointments for some, but what emerged from this period of time between May and September of 1787 has endured as the lighted lantern of a free people. One immense yet single goal, attested to "through baptism by fire" - by the magnificent, dedicated few, overcoming personal agendas to protect the future of the many. We sense the urgency to create a fail-safe document, mingling uneasily with the underlying fear that if mistakes were made now, all could be circumvented by the unscrupulous in the centuries to follow. We feel the intense, vibrant and varying personalities that tried to beat the political bushes enough to rout out the roaches that may be lurking in the document. It's such a mess today it's hard to justify the making of a central government without feeling somewhat foolish; but It was clear that something had to be done with the Articles of Confederation; the "sovereign states" had become so sovereign that they considered themselves untouchable with regards to sending monies to the common kitty to pay down debt. Nobody knew this better than George Washington; in the throes of the Revolution itself, his pleas for supplies, payrolls for his army, seemingly were tabled inexcusably, maddeningly - by the existing congress even in the face of possibly losing the war for liberty itself. So, after the was won under such duress (another miracle) the gathering of the "demigods", heeded the call together in high secrecy in Philadelphia for the forming of a central government, whose citizens were to be protected by a truly unique "Constitution" - even though those patriots such as Patrick Henry were absent in protest fearing another imperial government might be unfolding).

This is truly a magnificent book, highly recommended for those who follow history. One observation the author makes clear is the fact that many Americans today don't know as much as they should about the debates; and I fear our history teachers may be to blame for some of it. Such an event needs constant fanning of a flame, interesting dialog, and too often it becomes dry and boring without that flame.

Another "must have" accounting for anyone interested in the actual debates over the Constitution, the Library of America offers one that is entitled simply enough: "Debate on The Constitution", which is a venerable collection of the best and most eloquent of the many writings by the differing minds that were wrangling over it's writing and ratification at the time. The collection was "selected by Bernard Bailin and includes Benjamin Franklin's famous acceptance speech " I agree to this Constitution with all it's faults" - which is quite a missive in itself, of course.

We all know how it turned out, but she takes us there again, with a strength of insight and devotion seldom seen. Yet another literary gem can be noted for posterity from CDB's book with this short, yet poignant verse of her own:

"If all the tales are told, re-tell them, Brother. If few attend, let those who listen, feel."

She speaks for many with those words; I know she speaks for me.
Cordanara
I read this book in 1987, during the bicentennial of the Constitution. When Bowen described what happened at Philadelphia that year as a miracle, she wasn't being original -- she was merely quoting George Washington who, as head interlocutor of the whole mess, was in a pretty good position to make that judgment. That people from 13 very different colonies, each with different and competing interests, each jealous of its sovereignty, and each stubborn as heck and suspicious of each other should ever find a way to work past their differences and produce our Constitution was indeed a miracle. More than once during the deliberations, Washington despaired. All the delegates were never present at once. Rhode Island never sent any. Others came and went, because they had business back home to tend to, personal and otherwise. And they were all kids, except for Benjamin Franklin, at 81 the oldest. But even with him there, the avg age was 41. Yet they had the maturity to be willing to meet in the sweltering, near-record heat of that summer, closing the windows so nobody could overhear their discussions, managing never to leak a word (though somebody had to tail the talkative Franklin to head him off when he started to say something he shouldn't), and adopting house rules that included "to make sure everyone has the freedom to change his mind, or just to throw out thoughts for discussion purposes without being attacked for them now or later, we're not putting anything down in writing till we reach a final decision." Reading this book made me aware how special our Constitution is. (And what a bunch of cretins our current congressman are compared to the founding fathers -- who were like them in almost every way except for that when push came to shove, they'd rather compromise than allow the country to die aborning by being ultra-rigid on their positions and calling it "standing on principles".)
Dont_Wory
I read this as a book club member and so was not too thrilled at the prospect of plowing through what I thought would be singularly boring stuff. However, one of the reasons I joined a book club was to step out of my normal comfort zone. Happily, with this book I was pleasantly surprised. The first quarter of the book I did find somewhat pedantic but I stuck with it and, to my surprise, I became really interested. By the end, I was awestruck at the way in which the men who attended the convention managed to pull together, in spite of many, many differences, and create the document known as the Constitution of the United States of America. I only wish those who represent the U.S. now could be so farsighted and as willing to set aside their own personal/political agendas and do what is the best for the country in the future. Perhaps it should be set reading for all those in Congress now, if they have not read it before.
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