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Download Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky, His Life and Legacy ePub

by Sanford D. Horwitt

Download Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky, His Life and Legacy ePub
  • ISBN 0394572432
  • ISBN13 978-0394572437
  • Language English
  • Author Sanford D. Horwitt
  • Publisher Knopf; 1st edition (November 12, 1989)
  • Pages 595
  • Formats rtf lit doc mbr
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1202 kb
  • Size Fb2 1652 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 477

In the course of his flamboyant career as an all-purpose activist, Saul Alinsky went from organizing working-class ethnics in one of Chicago's most blighted neighborhoods to mapping out strategies for the civil rights and antiwar movements of the 1960s. He enlisted allies-from Catholic clergymen to labor unionists and black activists-in battles waged against opponents from slumlords to the Eastman Kodak corporation. The range of Alinsky's activities, the intensity of his beliefs, and his exhilarating mixture of crudeness and calculation almost vibrate off the pages of this passionate and inspiring biography.

Lest anyone think Let Them Call Me Rebel is all nuts and bolts, there are some inspiring moments

Lest anyone think Let Them Call Me Rebel is all nuts and bolts, there are some inspiring moments.

Horwitt, Sanford D. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Lest anyone think Let Them Call Me Rebel is all nuts and bolts, there are some inspiring moments

Lest anyone think Let Them Call Me Rebel is all nuts and bolts, there are some inspiring moments. An excellent and accurate study of the life and career of the late, great community organizer Saul Alinsky. Having spent the best part of a decade of the seventies working as an Alinsky style lead organizer I can say that Horwitt provides a more than fair overview of Alinsky's theories and both his triumphs and failures. Horwitt provides an excellent analysis of Alinsky's first, and some would say, seminal organizing efforts in Chicago's Back of the Yards.

1989 If all the Japs were removed tomorrow wed never miss them in two weeks because. University of California, Davis. CRD 142 - Winter 2014.

Let Them Call Me Rebel : Saul Alinsky-His Life and Legacy. Scientific Knowledge, Discourse Ethics, and Consensus Formation on Public Policy Issues. Beyond the Science Wars : Contemplating the Democratiza- tion of Science If all the Japs were removed tomorrow wed never miss them in two weeks because.

This book is required reading for anyone who is interested in understanding what a "community organizer" is and what he does in Chicago. Barack Obama worked for organizations founded by Saul Alinsky and run by his proteges

This book is required reading for anyone who is interested in understanding what a "community organizer" is and what he does in Chicago. Barack Obama worked for organizations founded by Saul Alinsky and run by his proteges. It is a unique training, to say the least, for a Presidential candidate.

Alinsky's personal tragedies-his first wife drowned, his second wife had multiple sclerosis-seemed to drive him harder in crusading for social justice. His sharp criticism of what he saw as shortcomings in the civil rights movement and the federal war on poverty make this book timely. Founded and operated by trained historians, Ground Zero Books, Lt. serves the book collector, the scholar, and institutions. We focus on the individual, and.

Saul Alinsky was not the first community organizer. Sanford D. Horwitt, Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky: His Life and Legacy (New York: Vintage, 1992), 29. oogle Scholar. Far from it. Organizers have existed in myriad forms since the very beginnings of human civilization  . 11. Saul Alinsky, Rules for Radicals (New York: Vintage, 1971), 136;Google Scholar.

Synopsis of Sanford D. Horwitt, Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky―His Life and Legacy (New York: Vintage, 1989). Discussed at Digging Deeper (ww. fppc. org) on September 17, 2007. Download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd.

Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky; His Life and Legacy tells the story of a Chicago community organizer, and .

Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky; His Life and Legacy tells the story of a Chicago community organizer, and Feingold: A New Democratic Party deals with . senator Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, whom Horwitt considers the great hope for progressive politics in the Democratic Party. Horwitt's biography of Alinsky seeks to offer new insight into the decades-long work of one of Chicago's most radical personalities.

Saul Alinsky: His Life and Legacy. By Sandord D. Horwitt. Category: Biography & Memoir Domestic Politics. In the course of his flamboyant career as an all-purpose activist, Saul Alinsky went from organizing working-class ethnics in one of Chicago’s most blighted neighborhoods to mapping out strategies for the civil rights and antiwar movements of the 1960s. He enlisted allies-from Catholic clergymen to labor unionists and black activists, in battles waged against opponents from slumlords to the Eastman Kodak corporation.

Talk about Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky, His Life and Legacy


Vojar
This fat biography of an American icon of greatness/evil (take your pick) has something to annoy everyone. Admirers will cringe to learn that their favorite Alinsky stories were mere bluster and self-promotion. Critics will droop when they learn that his references to Lucifer and Marx were deliberate provocative twaddle, not his true beliefs. Those who fell for any of that, meet the real Alinsky in the meticulous research of author Sanford Horwitz. Alinsky was street smart and ivory tower smart - sociology degree, insider studying the Al Capone mob for his PhD in criminology, criminologist for the Illinois state prison system, labor organizer for the CIO who applied union methods to communities, grant-seeker who pried tons of money from Chicago's wealtiest elite (the Marshall Field fortune), and practical idealist raging for justice for underdogs of any flavor. His books Reveille for Radicals and Rules for Radicals don't tell you HOW he organized communties, but this superb biography does. Critics take heed: you don't know half how dangerous he really was. Admirers, this undeservedly obscure bio will geld your high-horse. Put a little reality into your Alinsky - read this book!
Bundis
Saul Alinsky wrote two books that have become must-reads for politicians and activists on the right, in the center, and on the left: "Reveille for Radicals" and "Rules for Radicals." The word "radical," however, conjures up images of wild-eyed bomb-throwers trying to overthrow the government of the U.S. A radical in Alinsky's terminology is actually someone trying to get to the "root" of matters. Alinsky, therefore, is better referred to as a Jeffersonian activist, who instructs various communities how to organize to fight for what is right. A key rule is to get the Establishment (a company or an agency) to follow its own rules.In "Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky, His Life and Legacy," we follow Alinsky through his formative years as he gained knowledge about how to work with people and to get them to work with their neighbors for common goals.Let Them Call Me Rebel: Saul Alinsky: His Life and Legacy

Howard Denson
Author: "Mowbray and the Sharks," "Shoot-Out with a Wild-eyed Radical," and "A Quandary of Fibbles"
Eigeni
Saul Alinsky was a very complex person, absolutely dedicated to to justice and compassion for everyone, especially those who were in a position to be taken advantage of. He is an inspiration for our time. The well-researched biography gracefully records all the aspects of Alinsky's life, to make a very good read.
Kerdana
It's the top biography of the top community organizer in the country. If you're into that then you'll like this book
Adoraris
Saul is the man with the plan. So inspirational.
Modifyn
This book is required reading for anyone who is interested in understanding what a "community organizer" is and what he does in Chicago. Barack Obama worked for organizations founded by Saul Alinsky and run by his proteges.
Obama never gives details of his community organizing, but this book tells what he would have been doing for his several years in the 1980's in Chicago: teaching people how to boycott, protest and threaten the economically and politically powerful in order to get what they want.
It is a unique training, to say the least, for a Presidential candidate.
Ionzar
As sick a man as ever was.
I approached this book having read Rules for Radicals two or three times over the past 15 years. What I knew of Alinsky, I knew from that book or from the fear and loathing he inspires to this day among reactionary corners of society. Neither of these sources are very reliable when it comes to finding out more about the nuts and bolts of community organizing through the depression on into the 1960s.

For one thing, Alinsky loved to talk himself up as a larger than life character. It's what made him so good at what he did. It's why people across the nation not only turned to him for help, but they organized themselves in order to bring him to California, or Rochester, NY or Kansas City. But as a primary source on himself, Alinsky's books require getting through some of the self promotion.

As for his critics, all I would say is this: to this day some claim Alinsky's tactics and his goals (fighting slumlords, free lunches for children, black people voting and being hired for good jobs proportionately, general self-empowerment) were somehow sinister and worthy of derision. These negative comments say more about his critics and where their intentions are at, and they ought to be ashamed.

Sanford Horwitt does a beautiful job breaking down the triumphs and tragedies of organizing in some very tough communities. He also takes a close look at the relationships required to actually bring about social change, touching on a vast network of allies from the Chicago Archdiocese to Stokely Carmichael to the founders of Marshall Field's Department Stores. When the romantic veneer that someone like Alinsky put on his own work is pushed away, Horwitt's biggest accomplishment is making the structure of community organizing absorbing and readable. That said, there are moments when I would have liked to have seen more about what the goals Alinsky fought for and won looked like in practice rather than just the process of getting there. But then, that was one of the subject's main contentions in life: the process of democracy is just as important as the end result.

One can't even begin looking into Saul Alinsky's life without finding some reference to his concept that "...power--not reason--was fundamental to the achievement of social change." While the idea isn't at all a surprise to anyone, there are still sectors of society that seem to reject it while trying to initiate change. Take the example of the Tea Party vs. the Occupy Wall Street movements. While it would be inaccurate to analogize the two too closely, the former did take power from the hands of conservative Republicans and reshape the party in furtherance of their cause by voting and contributing time/money (the sources of that money are irrelevant). The latter merely raised a ruckus and might very well be relegated to the status of an insignificant flare-up if they don't take the reins and command a bit of power for themselves at the ballot box or somewhere else. "Consciousness raising" and "awareness" of the issues means nothing if you don't have any tools to create change.

Lest anyone think Let Them Call Me Rebel is all nuts and bolts, there are some inspiring moments. One of the best ideas Alinsky actually went through with that I had never read before reading this book: African Americans who had been ignored for years by their local alderman (city councilman) raising funds throughout their own neighborhoods with cookouts and house parties, in order to load up a dozen buses full of black folks in 1960s Chicago to go downtown and register to vote at City Hall. It was a media circus, it was a shock to a complacent political system, it was fun for the participants, it was mischief making and productive, and it was people helping themselves. It was a close to a perfect Alinsky tactic as you could get.