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Download Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism ePub

by Meghan L. O'Sullivan

Download Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism ePub
  • ISBN 0815706014
  • ISBN13 978-0815706014
  • Language English
  • Author Meghan L. O'Sullivan
  • Publisher Brookings Institution Press (January 16, 2003)
  • Pages 424
  • Formats lrf rtf txt docx
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1293 kb
  • Size Fb2 1520 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 167

Policymakers will need all the tools at their disposal to craft an effective response to international terrorism and to protect and promote other U.S. interests in the coming decades. In this quest to shape the right strategies for the challenges ahead, economic instruments will play a central role. O'Sullivan, an expert on the use of positive and negative tools of economic statecraft, argues that in the post-September 11th international climate, the United States will be even more willing to use its economic power to advance its foreign policy goals than it has in the past. This impulse, she argues, can lead to a more effective foreign policy given the many ways in which sanctions and incentives can forcefully advance U.S. interests. But a recalibration of these tools—sanctions in particular—is necessary in order for them to live up to their potential. Critical to such a reassessment is a thorough understanding of how the post-cold war international environment—globalization and American primacy in particular—has influenced how sanctions work. O'Sullivan addresses this issue in a thorough examination of sanctions-dominated policies in place against Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Sudan. Her findings not only highlight the many ways in which sanctions have often been poorly suited to achieve their goals in the past, but also suggest how policymakers might use these tools to better effect in the future. This book will provide a valuable resource for policymakers groping to find the right set of instruments to address both the old and the new challenges facing the United States. It will also serve as an important resource to those interested in U.S. policy toward 'rogue' states and in the status of the sanctions debate between policymakers and scholars.


O'Sullivan's book is an attempt to rescue sanctions from this current state by showing their potential as effective policy to change the sanctioned . This book's twin cardinal virtues are its thoroughness and its cautious conclusions.

O'Sullivan's book is an attempt to rescue sanctions from this current state by showing their potential as effective policy to change the sanctioned state's behavior. She does this by closely examining four case studies where the . employed sanctions against countries it deemed to be state sponsors of terrorism - Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Sudan. Despite footnoting every twist and turn in how the .

Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism. "Meghan L. O'Sullivan". Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Book Discussion on "The Insurgents:David Petraeus and the Plot to Change the American Way of War". Louisville Free Public Library. Retrieved 2019-12-26. "Meghan O'Sullivan". "A Reporter at Large: The General's Dilemma, David Petraeus, the pressures of politics, and the road out of Iraq.

O'Sullivan's book is an attempt to rescue sanctions from this current state by showing their potential as effective policy . p. cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.

Shrewd Sanctions offers fresh insight into the sanctions debate, looking beyond general arguments over whether .

Shrewd Sanctions offers fresh insight into the sanctions debate, looking beyond general arguments over whether sanctions do or don't work to how and when sanctions policies can be crafted to deliver results. Of particular relevance is O'Sullivan's examination of sanctions in the context of pressing foreign policy challenges: terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. Her analysis and recommendations will be invaluable to policymakers and stakeholders engaged with this important issue. Meghan L. O'Sullivan is a staff member in the Policy Planning division of the State Department and a former fellow in the foreign policy studies program at the Brookings Institution.

This book will provide a valuable resource for policymakers groping to find .

Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism - Libro electrónico escrito por Meghan L. O'Sullivan. This book will provide a valuable resource for policymakers groping to find the right set of instruments to address both the old and the new challenges facing the United States.

O’Sullivan, an expert on the use of positive and negative tools of economic statecraft, argues that in the . O'Sullivan is a staff member in the Policy Planning division of the State Department and a former fellow in the foreign policy studies program at the Brookings Institution

O’Sullivan, an expert on the use of positive and negative tools of economic statecraft, argues that in the post-September 11th international climate, the United States will be even more willing to use its economic power to advance its foreign policy.

Shrewd Sanctions book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

O'Sullivan has produced a superb study of sanctions that should be required reading for UN and US policy-makers.

O'Sullivan has produced a superb study of sanctions that should be required reading for UN and US policy-makers a superbly written investigation of the effectiveness of . sanctions against Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Sudan. товар 2 Shrewd Sanctions Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism Paperback O'Sullivan -Shrewd Sanctions Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism Paperback O'Sullivan. 366,14 RUB. + 199,55 RUB за доставку.

O'Sullivan, an expert on the use of positive and negative tools of economic statecraft, argues that in the post-September 11th . O'Sullivan addresses this issue in a thorough examination of sanctions-dominated policies in place against Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Sudan.

O'Sullivan, an expert on the use of positive and negative tools of economic statecraft, argues that in the post-September 11th international climate, the United States will be even more willing to use its economic power to advance its foreign policy goals than it has in the past. This impulse, she argues, can lead to a more effective foreign policy given the many ways in which sanctions and incentives can forcefully advance .

Meghan L. O’Sullivan. Book Description: Policymakers will need all the tools at their disposal to craft an effective response to international terrorism and to protect and promote other . interests in the coming decades. Published by: Brookings Institution Press. In this quest to shape the right strategies for the challenges ahead, economic instruments will play a central role.

Talk about Shrewd Sanctions: Statecraft and State Sponsors of Terrorism


Thetalas
Over the last two decades, American policymakers have increasingly used sanctions to punish countries that transgress U.S. and international norms, or attack U.S. interests. Sometimes these sanctions are coordinated with multilateral sanctions; sometimes the U.S. applies them alone. Sometimes the U.S. puts forward comprehensive sanctions against a country; sometimes it only sanctions particular companies or organizations in a country rather than the country itself. In some cases, the U.S. continually adjusts its sanctions against a particular country; in other cases, those sanctions remain fairly static.
The variety of sanction packages begs a question: which ones actually work in changing the behavior of the state being sanctioned? Part of the surprising multifaceted answer to this question, according to Meghan O' Sullivan, is that many policymakers don't even seem to care. Instead, they look upon sanctions as a generic expression of disapproval against the country being sanctioned -- with U.S. domestic interests often affecting the actual shape that disapproval takes -- rather than as a practical tool of statecraft.
O'Sullivan's book is an attempt to rescue sanctions from this current state by showing their potential as effective policy to change the sanctioned state's behavior. She does this by closely examining four case studies where the U.S. employed sanctions against countries it deemed to be state sponsors of terrorism - Iran, Iraq, Libya, and Sudan.
This book's twin cardinal virtues are its thoroughness and its cautious conclusions. Despite footnoting every twist and turn in how the U.S. employed sanctions in the four cases, and what subsequently happened in those sanctioned countries, O'Sullivan never overreaches in her claims. Many places in the book, she is careful to note that proving what sanctions accomplished (or did not accomplish) in any particular case is extremely difficult to separate from other factors affecting the outcome. Nevertheless, she superbly teases out some interesting and valuable conclusions from the data.
At the end of her book, O'Sullivan focuses on what policymakers need to do to make sanctions effective policy rather than just dramatic policy. She believes they should employ sanctions that are flexible, as well as maintain open channels of communication with the sanctioned country. Too often, U.S. policymakers have used rigid and redundant guidelines for sanctions that don't allow the target to be rewarded for good behavior. Without this flexibility, there is almost no incentive for the country to change. This causes the U.S. sanctions regime against it to harden into permanent U.S. policy, even when there is little interest in either country for this to happen.
Muniath
It is unfortunate that the debate with respect to the use of sanctions so often boils down to a religious one - sanctions good or sanctions bad. What nuance there is in that argument often seems as similarly simplistic - multi-lateral sanctions good, unilateral sanctions bad. In this context, Meghan O'Sullivan's "Shrewd Sanctions" presents a timely and carefully reasoned call for a more finely calibrated approach to the use of sanctions as a tool of foreign policy. In each of four case studies covering Libya, Iraq, Iran and Sudan, O'Sullivan evaluates sanctions regimes against a set of criteria which includes their economic and political impact, effectiveness relative to the goals laid out for them, the varied costs associated with their imposition, and the relative effectiveness of these sanctions regimes vs. alternative policy instruments. In her final chapter, O'Sullivan lays out a series of specific recommendations for policy makers to strengthen the performance of sanctions.
"Shrewd Sanctions" does seem to me one of those rare books able to appeal to a "crossover" audience - of sanctions "experts" on the one hand, and relative foreign policy novices on the other. That it does so is a tribute to O'Sullivan's fluid writing, rigorous and straightforward analysis, and her ability to continually frame the most specific instances and arguments in a broader context - both historically and in the most current and urgent geo-political sense. I expect this to be a staple in classrooms and in the foreign policy establishment for some time to come.