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Download Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution ePub

by Richard Appignanesi

Download Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution ePub
  • ISBN 184046156X
  • ISBN13 978-1840461565
  • Language English
  • Author Richard Appignanesi
  • Publisher Icon Books (July 10, 1996)
  • Pages 176
  • Formats rtf lit mbr doc
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1817 kb
  • Size Fb2 1926 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 634

Lenin is the key to understanding the Russian Revolution. His dream was the creation of the world's first Socialist state. It was a short-lived dream that became a nightmare when Stalin rose to absolute power in 1929. Lenin was the avant-garde revolutionary who adapted Marxist theory to the pravtical realitites of a vast, complex and backward Russia.

This small book is good for a quick overview of the the Russian Revolution and Lenin's life

This small book is good for a quick overview of the the Russian Revolution and Lenin's life. It explains the basic ideas pretty well and has the important facts laid out in an interesting and easy to understand way. Still, this book is biased towards Lenin's cause, and justifies to too great an extent Lenin's killing of hundreds of thousands of people in the Red Terror. If you need a quick study guide on the Russian Revolution, this book is fine - just keep in mind that Lenin was not really as benevolent a person as he is made out to be in the cartoons

Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution (Icon Books, London, 2000) - illustrated by Oscar Zarate.

Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution (Icon Books, London, 2000) - illustrated by Oscar Zarate.

Lenin is the key to understanding the Russian Revolution. His dream as the creation of the world's first Socialist state. It was a short-lived dream that became a nightmare when Stalin rose to absolute power in 1929. Lenin was the avant-garde revolutionary who adapted Marxist theory to the practical realities of a vast, complex and backward Russia.

Format Paperback 176 pages. Dimensions 140 x 208 x 19mm 250g. Publication date 01 Aug 2000. Publisher Icon Books Ltd. Publication City/Country Duxford, United Kingdom. Lenin, Liberation, and Laughs. com User, September 18, 2002. Whilst many may claim that this book is a celebration of the machine that allowed Stalin to instigate genocide upon Russia, it is the underlying satire and wit that guide's the reader through the basics of the Russian revolution and to more complex questions that pose themselves in the post-glasnost era. This is not a complete overview of Russia in the grips of socialism, but that was never the purpose.

Richard Appignanesi, Oscar Zarate. Lenin is the key to understanding the Russian Revolution. Is he chiefly to blame for opening the way to the totalitarian regime of Stalin? Readers will be able to judge for themselves.

Home Richard Appignanesi Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution. Bibliographic Details. Title: Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution Publisher: Icon Books Publication Date: 1996 Binding: Paperback Book Condition: Good. Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution. Published by Icon Books, 1996. ISBN 10: 184046156X, ISBN 13: 9781840461565. 1. Appignanesi, Richard. Published by Icon Books (1996). ISBN 10: 184046156X ISBN 13: 9781840461565.

Personal Name: Appignanesi, Richard 1940- Sonstige (DE-588)109060644. Download DOC book format. Personal Name: Zarate, Oscar Sonstige (DE-588)109060652. Download now Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution: Download PDF book format.

Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution. by Richard Appignanesi. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9781840461565 (978-1-84046-156-5) Softcover, Icon Books, 1996. Find signed collectible books: 'Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution'.

Talk about Introducing Lenin and the Russian Revolution


net rider
It is difficult to believe that a figure as complex as Vladimir Lenin could be successfully presented in a simple and humorous manner, but this book does exactly that. It is excellent not only for beginners seeking a quick overview of Lenin and the Russian Revolution, but also provides a refreshing antidote for experts who have grown weary of trying to plough through the biased and deadly dull works of hacks like Richard Pipes and Dmitri Volkogonov. You'll get a much more informative portrait of Lenin from this book's 175 short pages of cartoons mixed with facts than you would from Volkogonov's 500 page diatribe (_Lenin: A New Biography_).
Is this book a case of "Schoolhouse Rock" meeting the Russian Revolution? Not exactly. It is more ideally suited for high-school students and young adults, but readers of all ages will enjoy the light-hearted format. It occasionally displays a slight bias in Lenin's favor, but this should be seen as a good thing when you consider that even the better biographies of Lenin accessible to American readers (Adam B. Ulam's _The Bolsheviks_, for example) all contain a much more decided bias against him.
Considering that it is inexpensive and will only take a day or so to finish, I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Lenin and the Russian Revolution. You'll get a few laughs from it, too.
Sagda
This small book is good for a quick overview of the the Russian Revolution and Lenin's life. It explains the basic ideas pretty well and has the important facts laid out in an interesting and easy to understand way.
Still, this book is biased towards Lenin's cause, and justifies to too great an extent Lenin's killing of hundreds of thousands of people in the Red Terror.
If you need a quick study guide on the Russian Revolution, this book is fine - just keep in mind that Lenin was not really as benevolent a person as he is made out to be in the cartoons. But, if you are trying to really understand the topic or write a serious research paper on it, save your money and buy another book on Lenin, such as "Lenin" by Robert Service.
Velan
Now I've read just read this book and have come up with a few important mistakes in the text. A small example is that it claims that Martov "has first-hand experience of stick-action among Jewish socialist workers (the Bund). The first mass strike of 15,000 Bundists occurs at a Bialystok textile industry in 1895." (p.48)
This is all very nice except that Martov was a Jewish Socialist, yes, but not a Bundist, which is obvious from page 70 onwards when the Bund walks out of the 27th session, but Martov stays with the Mensheviks. Another problem with this statment is that it would have been impossible for the Bund to organise a 15,000 worker, mass-strike in Bialystok in 1895, becuase the Bund wasn't formed until 1897. And no the name was not simply chosen for the organisation because it was popular and therefore it was an easy mistake. The name of the Bund was debated over and changed three times before it got it's full name.
Good idea, but really, these factual errors are embarressing.
Gold Crown
Whilst many may claim that this book is a celebration of the machine that allowed Stalin to instigate genocide upon Russia, it is the underlying satire and wit that guide's the reader through the basics of the Russian revolution and to more complex questions that pose themselves in the post-glasnost era. This is not a complete overview of Russia in the grips of socialism, but that was never the purpose. The book highlights the important aspects of the period and introduces the more multifaceted situations. A superb read and a good buy.