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Download No Holding Back: The 1980 John B. Anderson Presidential Campaign ePub

by Jim Mason

Download No Holding Back: The 1980 John B. Anderson Presidential Campaign ePub
  • ISBN 0761852263
  • ISBN13 978-0761852261
  • Language English
  • Author Jim Mason
  • Publisher UPA (September 22, 2011)
  • Pages 614
  • Formats mobi lrf mbr lit
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1495 kb
  • Size Fb2 1878 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 118

No Holding Back tells the story of John Anderson's 1980 presidential campaign. Anderson gave up a safe seat in the House of Representatives, a position in the Republican leadership, and a likely nomination for a Senate seat to run what every expert considered a hopeless race for the GOP presidential nomination. Anderson did so because he was disturbed by many of the same trends in American politics that still exist today: the proliferation of special interests, gridlock on Capitol Hill, and the unwillingness of his fellow politicians to speak honestly about the critical issues facing the nation. More than anything, Anderson wanted to make a statement about how candidates ought to run for office: by rejecting quick-fix solutions, being candid on where one stood on matters of policy, and not sugarcoating the problems that faced voters.Anderson ran as a kind of anti-candidate. He had a unique campaigning style and offered proposals that differed greatly from the standard Republican viewpoint. People found him refreshingly direct and different. As interest turned to the campaign, he attracted widespread media attention. He performed beyond expectations in the first round of primaries and soon switched to an independent candidacy. By June, he was running at 26% in a three-way race against Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. Against the backdrop of runaway inflation, the Iranian hostage situation, a debilitating energy crisis, and a discredited incumbent president, pollsters found him winning unprecedented support. But during the summer, troubled by ballot access problems, financial issues, institutional obstacles, and management difficulties, Anderson's polling totals began to fall. Once it became clear that he would not win, his support collapsed and he limped to a 7% finish. This final result has greatly undermined the importance of this campaign. It has influenced numerous future candidates and changed the way many politicians would run for office. His was the first candidacy to expose how

In 1978, Anderson formed a presidential campaign exploratory committee, finding little public or media interest. No Holding Back: The 1980 John B. Anderson Presidential Campaign. Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

In 1978, Anderson formed a presidential campaign exploratory committee, finding little public or media interest. In late April 1979, Anderson made the decision to enter the Republican primary, joining a field that included Ronald Reagan, Bob Dole, John Connally, Howard Baker, George H. W. Bush, and the perennial candidate Harold Stassen. Within the last weeks of 1979, Anderson introduced his signature campaign proposal, advocating that a 50-cent a gallon gas tax be enacted with a corresponding.

No Holding Back tells the story of John Anderson's 1980 presidential campaign. Mason lovingly chronicles John B. Anderson's 1980 presidential campaign. Anderson gave up a safe seat in the House of Representatives. After failing to win the Republican nomination, Anderson won 7 percent of the vote as an independent candidate against Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. Anderson gave up a safe seat in the House of Representatives, a position in the Republican leadership, and a likely nomination for a Senate seat to run what every expert considered a hopeless race for the GOP presidential nomination.

Mason lovingly chronicles John B. Readers seeking a detailed description of the Anderson campaign will find.

No Holding Back tells the story of John Anderson's 1980 presidential campaign

No Holding Back tells the story of John Anderson's 1980 presidential campaign. Anderson did so because he was disturbed by many of the same t No Holding Back tells the story of John Anderson's 1980 presidential campaign

No Holding Back The 1980 John B. Anderson then performed well beyond expectations in the first round of the GOP primaries

No Holding Back The 1980 John B. Anderson then performed well beyond expectations in the first round of the GOP primaries. For a brief time, he was considered the major challenger to Reagan for the nomination, but he lost a critical showdown in his home state that greatly damaged his chances of winning the nomination. Anderson was in the unusual position of having a growing national following while at the same time it was becoming increasingly unlikely that he could wrestle the nomination from Reagan.

Jim Mason, in No Holding Back : The 1980 John B. Anderson Presidential Campaign (2011), Ch. 8 : April to June 1980 A Co-Equal Third Contender. Anderson was the first major mainstream political figure to align himself with the independent movement that still exists today in American politics. Secondly, he was the first candidate to expose how voters would appreciate a new realism in American politics. In the aftermath of 1980, candidates were expected to speak in a more straight-forward manner to the voter than in past campaigns, rather than basing campaigns upon promises that the candidate often knew he had little chance of keeping.

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Anderson entered the 1980 Republican presidential primaries, introducing his signature campaign proposal of raising . Australia's John Anderson & Dr. Jordan B Peterson: In Conversation. Former Australian Deputy PM John Anderson and I speak again.

Anderson entered the 1980 Republican presidential primaries, introducing his signature campaign proposal of raising the gas tax while cutting social security taxes. He established himself as a contender for the nomination in the early primaries but eventually dropped out of the Republican race, choosing to pursue an independent campaign for president. Ronald Reagan and John Anderson Debate on September 21, 1980.

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In his new book "No Holding Back: the 1980 John B. Anderson Presidential Campaign," Jim Mason has reminded us of the importance of this campaign. We are about to enter another presidential campaign in a political climate where voters' interest in alternatives to the two major parties is perhaps more than it was thirty years ago.

Mason's account of the campaign illustrates why non-major party candidates cannot win. Anderson's staff spent much of its time doing the kinds of things that major party candidates take for granted: getting voters to sign petitions to get on state ballots, qualifying for matching funds and even bank loans, receiving media attention, etc. This was time and money that could have gone into efforts that would have increased the number of voters informed about the candidacy.

The Anderson "National Unity" campaign, as noted by Mason, paved the way for future independent and third party candidates. He achieved ballot status on all fifty state ballots plus the District of Columbia, which undoubtedly helped Ross Perot with his campaign of 1992. He received enough support in the polls to be included in a national debate with one of the major party candidates in September 1980 (which also assisted Perot '92). He received several endorsements from some in a skeptical media.

But the Anderson legacy goes far beyond these matters. Anderson made the voters question what candidates tell them. He correctly predicted, for example, that Candidate Reagan's budget would not be balanced by President Reagan because it asked for no sacrifices by the public. Reagan had attacked Anderson's own budget for supporting some higher taxes. This willingness to say what voters do not want to hear earned him the reputation as a candidate who distinguished himself from others.

Voters still naturally resist talk of sacrifice and may not follow details they are offered. They may decry the Democratic and Republican ideas as "politics as usual" but vote for the candidates who espouse them, anyway. And they usually ignore candidates on ballots without an "R" or a "D" behind their name.

Anderson raised the voice of independents and made it count. Not in the way of electoral votes but in the way of presenting a candidacy as a credible alternative to the major party candidates. If we ever break the deadlock of voting for what we want to hear, we must remember his legacy of telling it like it really is.

Voters of all political backgrounds will enjoy Mason's most definitive account of a landmark campaign.

Dean T. Hartwell
Author, "Truth Matters: How the Voters Can Take Back Their Nation"
Zut
One of the best political sagas I've read in a long time. It traces the rises and fall of the Anderson campaign on 1980 in a manner that is comprehensive yet extremely readable. Even the most dedicated political junky will learn a lot. Mason's elegant writing ranks up there with Theodore White and Richard Ben Cramer.