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Download Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities (Thorndike Press Large Print Nonfiction Series) ePub

by Elizabeth Edwards

Download Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities (Thorndike Press Large Print Nonfiction Series) ePub
  • ISBN 1410417220
  • ISBN13 978-1410417220
  • Language English
  • Author Elizabeth Edwards
  • Publisher Thorndike Pr; Large Print edition (July 17, 2009)
  • Pages 219
  • Formats doc docx azw lit
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1753 kb
  • Size Fb2 1466 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 746

The author recounts some of the difficulties she has faced, including the death of her son, cancer, and her husband's public affair, and shares how she has managed to adapt and survive.

RESILIENCE certainly rises above a personal journal and can be read as a manual on how to live with adversity.

Ships from and sold by Inspiration Media. Far too much has been made of Mr. Edwards' infidelity by both the television and print media when the author gave interviews upon the publication of RESILIENCE. From the coverage, you would assume that that is pretty much what this book is about- the reason I had sworn off reading it. Nothing could be further from the truth. RESILIENCE certainly rises above a personal journal and can be read as a manual on how to live with adversity.

Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities. political figures in the country, and on the surface, seems to have led a charmed life.

Resilience : Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities. by Elizabeth Edwards. She's one of the most beloved political figures in the country, and on the surface, seems to have led a charmed life. In many ways, she has. Beautiful family.

And her own life has been on the line. Days before the 2004 presidential election-when her husband John was running for vice president-she was diagnosed with breast cancer. After rounds of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation the cancer went away-only to reoccur in 2007.

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Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities (Hardcover). Published July 1st 2009 by Thorndike Press. Large Print, Hardcover, 219 pages.

Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities (Hardcover). Author(s): Elizabeth Edwards. ISBN: 1410417220 (ISBN13: 9781410417220).

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Аудиокнига "Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities", Elizabeth Edwards. Читает Elizabeth Edwards. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Talk about Resilience: Reflections on the Burdens and Gifts of Facing Life's Adversities (Thorndike Press Large Print Nonfiction Series)


Gabar
I found Elizabeth Edwards' opening chapter on her Dad compelling, empowering, and inspiring. Two weeks ago, I flew home to care for Mom. She wanted to get better, but her digestive system had inexplicably shut down. She was recovering from surgery and unable to eat more than a few bites per meal. The food at the 24-hour nursing facility was terrible. I cleaned by night and cooked by day...brought in alternate lunches and dinners...waterboarded her with food. Sometimes she would eat just once bite out of a whole entree. But Mom did not give up on herself, and I did not give up on Mom. "Do NOT go gentle unto that good night."

The breakthrough was my finding a drug side-effect that had been stanching her appetite among her dozen drugs. Now she's eating full meals and slowly regaining strength. Don't trust the "experts" to know what they are doing.

Mom says I had won her trust. Priceless.

The one thing that made me wrinkle my brow was that Elizabeth felt diminished by what her husband did. I don't think she should. Women often try to be all things to all people, and that is humanly impossible.

Regarding the chapter on Toshiko...who put on a resolute face despite her physical and emotional scars from the first atomic bomb. Geishas are trained to not show negative or strong emotion because that leads to wrinkles, which limits one's career. Emotional botox.

It is a pleasure reading Edwards for her wisdom and thought processes. My lessons from this book...keep a steady hand on the tiller and don't give up...do the hard work of working through adversity.
Pedar
I find Elizabeth Edwards to be a remarkable woman, but I would call her life once of perseverance, rather than resilience. I've read both of her books, and there is little to speak of resilience in regard to her son's death, but I'm not sure I'd deal with it any better. However, her "grace" in handling all that came after that tragedy, her persevering, despite great odds against her personal survival and survival of her marriage, make this book, as well as her first book, definitely worth reading. She writes for a middle class generation who came of age in the late 1960's, writes well of all the "family values" instilled in us, the idealism of that era. Though my life experiences were entirely different, I could have been reading my own life in terms of her fantasies and idealism around family. I believe that most of us in middle class and lower upper class USA families, could say the same thing. Her writing allowed me to hand the book to my mother and say, "These are things I believed." I could hand the book to my children and say, "These are the things I believed when I was growing up." It opened many doors for communication. It also reminded me to count my blessings as a cancer survivor.
thrust
I highly recommend this book! It is written from the perspective of a woman who married her college sweetheart, suffered the death of her oldest child, chose to get pregnant again after 40, battled cancer, endured her husband's presidential campaign, and dealt with a unfaithful husband who fathered a child outside of marriage. This book is for anyone who has experienced any of these topics or knows someone who has and want an insight into their life and perspective.
Wenaiand
This book was not what I thought it would be. I adore Elizabeth and she had so much indescribable pain in her life and she handled it the best she could but, her book was depressing and so sad, I kept waiting for the resilience but it didn’t come, she did however survive. It hurts me to say that this book was not uplifting and a disappointment.
Cobyno
Elizabeth had quite a good life and then it all went down the sewey hole. She was still gracious and kind and did not bad mouth people like she could have done. She was quite an amazing, strong, good woman. John Edwards is an idiot.
Kadar
RESILIENCE must have been a difficult book to write. While it is extremely well-written-- Elizabeth Edwards is a first class writer-- it was difficult to read in that it is sad beyond measure. Your heart goes out to this decent and good woman who certainly deserves a better hand than life has dealt her. Writing a review is difficult as well.

Ms. Edwards writes, with all the passion and sorrow that only a parent who has lost a child can, of the death of her beloved son Wade at sixteen-- surely Euripides is right when he says that it is unnatural for a parent to bury a child in his magnificent play "The Trojan Women," one of Rose Kennedy's favorite pieces of literature, as I recall, for obvious reasons. Ms. Edwards also discusses in detail the recurrence of her cancer that has now been diagnosed as incurable, and finally there is the revelation of her husband's extra-marital affair. You have to admire Ms. Edwards tremendously for refusing to ever give the woman a name.

Far too much has been made of Mr. Edwards' infidelity by both the television and print media when the author gave interviews upon the publication of RESILIENCE. From the coverage, you would assume that that is pretty much what this book is about-- the reason I had sworn off reading it. Nothing could be further from the truth. And while I suppose that Edwards' fall from grace would have to be news since he had ambitions of being president-- one has to question his fitness for such a high office when he seems to have fathered a child out of wedlock (such a quaint term in these times) and apparently had no worries about unprotected sex-- but I for one hope we have heard the last about such reprehensible behavior on Edwards' part so that this woman can concentrate on fighting for her life without the constant coverage of the subject from the media.

Portions of this small volume-- around 200 pages-- are almost too painful to read. For example, Ms. Edwards' account of visiting her beloved son's grave daily for days and months (?) on end and reading to him the books that he would have been required to read before heading off to college may be the saddest thing I have read in years. In the chapter entitled "Eternity" I was not surprised to learn that Ms. Edwards did not find the solace she sought in her faith alone. "The problem of how to view death was the biggest cloud that stood between me and my faith." Or in the words of James Russell Lowell whom she quotes: "But not all the preaching since Adam/Has made Death other than Death." She concludes that "I have to accept that I cannot expect intervention now. I do not pray for my health. God gave me this world, and He gave me free will. It is my world, and now, if I am able, I have to fix it."

Elizabeth Edwards draws strength from the example of her father who suffered a stroke in April, 1990-- the family members were told by a physician whom Ms. Edwards had never seen before and whom she summarily banned from her father's hospital room-- that he was brain dead and would never walk again-- but who lived for 18 more years and talked again, drove a car again, danced again, went whale-watching in Alaska and traveled to both Poland and Spain. Is there any wonder that this woman has resilience? She also has her children, her extended internet family that she discussed in length in her previous book SAVING GRACES, the knowledge that she was able to forgive her husband-- although he will have to earn her trust again-- and a new venture: she is now the owner of a small furniture store in Chapel Hill. As she says so poignantly, the storm, so awful as it has been, has not blown her away; but she has had to adjust her sails.

RESILIENCE certainly rises above a personal journal and can be read as a manual on how to live with adversity. No less a cynic than Christopher Hitchens in the September issue of the "Atlantic" magazine wrote the most positive review of Ms. Edwards' book-- something I thought he was incapable of-- that I have ever read by him. His very fine review convinced me to read the book.