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Download The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy ePub

by Albert O. Hirschman

Download The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy ePub
  • ISBN 067476868X
  • ISBN13 978-0674768680
  • Language English
  • Author Albert O. Hirschman
  • Publisher Belknap Press; 1st edition (March 1, 1991)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats docx txt mobi mbr
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1417 kb
  • Size Fb2 1121 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 702

With engaging wit and subtle irony, Albert Hirschman maps the diffuse and treacherous world of reactionary rhetoric in which conservative public figures, thinkers, and polemicists have been arguing against progressive agendas and reforms for the past two hundred years.

Hirschman draws his examples from three successive waves of reactive thought that arose in response to the liberal ideas of the French Revolution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man, to democratization and the drive toward universal suffrage in the nineteenth century, and to the welfare state in our own century. In each case he identifies three principal arguments invariably used: (1) the perversity thesis, whereby any action to improve some feature of the political, social, or economic order is alleged to result in the exact opposite of what was intended; (2) the futility thesis, which predicts that attempts at social transformation will produce no effects whatever--will simply be incapable of making a dent in the status quo; (3) the jeopardy thesis, holding that the cost of the proposed reform is unacceptable because it will endanger previous hard-won accomplishments. He illustrates these propositions by citing writers across the centuries from Alexis de Tocqueville to George Stigler, Herbert Spencer to Jay Forrester, Edmund Burke to Charles Murray. Finally, in a lightning turnabout, he shows that progressives are frequently apt to employ closely related rhetorical postures, which are as biased as their reactionary counterparts. For those who aspire to the genuine dialogue that characterizes a truly democratic society, Hirschman points out that both types of rhetoric function, in effect, as contraptions designed to make debate impossible. In the process, his book makes an original contribution to democratic thought.The Rhetoric of Reaction is a delightful handbook for all discussions of public affairs, the welfare state, and the history of social, economic, and political thought, whether conducted by ordinary citizens or academics.


The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy is a book by theorist Albert O. Hirschman, which styles the rhetoric of conservatism in opposition to social change as consisting of three narratives: perversity, futility, and jeopardy, and t. .

The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy is a book by theorist Albert O. Hirschman, which styles the rhetoric of conservatism in opposition to social change as consisting of three narratives: perversity, futility, and jeopardy, and that, further, these narratives are simplistic and flawed, and cut off debate. After a historical examination of his thesis, he discusses corresponding progressive narratives, and proposes a new framework.

The Rhetoric of Reaction, Albert Hirschman Interesting book. Hard to read but probably worth the effort. Hirschman is concerned with three types of argument typically deployed by reactionaries, . The arguments are: (1) Perversity: "The change will only exacerbate the problem you are trying to solve. (2) Futility: "The change will achieve nothing, because it fails to acknowledge incontrovertible political, social or economic laws.

The Rhetoric of Reaction book. Start by marking The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy as Want to Read

The Rhetoric of Reaction book. With engaging wit and subtle irony, Albert Hirschman maps. Start by marking The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Albert Otto Hirschman (born Otto-Albert Hirschmann; April 7, 1915 – December 10, 2012) was an economist and the author of several books on political . The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy.

Albert Otto Hirschman (born Otto-Albert Hirschmann; April 7, 1915 – December 10, 2012) was an economist and the author of several books on political economy and political ideology. His first major contribution was in the area of development economics. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-76867-1 (cloth) and.

The Rhetoric of Reaction is a delightful handbook for all discussions of public affairs .

The Rhetoric of Reaction is a delightful handbook for all discussions of public affairs, the welfare state, and the history of social, economic, and political thought, whether condu. Albert O. Hirschman was Professor of Social Science, Emeritus, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, following a career of prestigious appointments, honors, and awards. Perhaps the most widely known and admired of his many books are Exit, Voice, and Loyalty (Harvard) and The Passions and the Interests (Princeton).

Hirschman, Albert O. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation.

Hirschman is concerned with three types of argument typically deployed by.3) Jeopardy: "The change will threaten or destroy some cherished previous accomplishment, such as freedom or democracy.

book by Albert O. Hirschman. Hirschman's approach is historical.

With engaging wit and subtle irony, Albert Hirschman maps the diffuse and treacherous world of reactionary . In each case he identifies three principal arguments invariably used-the theses of perversity, futility, and jeopardy

With engaging wit and subtle irony, Albert Hirschman maps the diffuse and treacherous world of reactionary rhetoric in which conservative public figures, thinke. In each case he identifies three principal arguments invariably used-the theses of perversity, futility, and jeopardy. He illustrates these propositions by citing writers across the centuries from Alexis de Tocqueville to George Stigler, Herbert Spencer to Jay Forrester, Edmund Burke to Charles Murray.

REPORT ON REACTION OF HYDROCARBONS BY SALIFU MUSAH (CME05061081) INTRODUCTION Organic compound are compounds which we mostly use in our daily life activities and except for few inorganic salts an.Report "Albert O. Hirschman The Rhetoric of Reaction- Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy.

Albert Hirschman was an amazing writer and his three slim books written . Hirschman pronounces the Perversity thesis the single most popular and effective weapon in the annals of reactionary rhetoric.

Albert Hirschman was an amazing writer and his three slim books written for a general readership make their points with incredible efficiency. Exit, Voice, and Loyalty is incisive about the individual’s relationship and loyalty to a provider or employer. The Rhetoric of Reaction is a bit more diffuse and abstract than those books. It is at its best when most concrete. I agree, and it dominates the book as well.

Talk about The Rhetoric of Reaction: Perversity, Futility, Jeopardy


Innadril
The Rhetoric of Reaction, Albert Hirschman
Interesting book. Hard to read but probably worth the effort. Thought provoking. An attempt to categorize the principle arguments and rhetorical positions used by reactionaries to argue against such historical progressive reforms such as: the welfare state, suffrage, democracy etc. Then, to a lesser degree, it turns to the progressive side. This book does not attempt to prove or disprove these arguments, only to identify the general form of the arguments and how they are used. Although the book looks at historical issues and arguments used over the last 200 years, you recognize the same rhetoric being used by current politicians and Facebook commentators today. Four stars because this is not an easy book to read.
Agalas
An interesting and well-reasoned account of "[T.H.] Marshall's three extensions
of the concept of citizenship" (civil, political, social), and in particular
the patterns of reaction to these changes, whereby opponents of the particular
change (say, universal sufferage, or social welfare) use arguments of
perversity, futility, or jeopardy to argue against the change. Contains
detailed accounts of the particulars of history and how those details (say, the
rather rocky start to democracy in revolutionary France, and the corresponding
cold feet across the channel) influenced the patterns of argument used.
Dagdardana
Hirschman is concerned with three types of argument typically deployed by reactionaries, i.e. conservatives vehemently, vocally and automatically opposed to proposed changes in the political, social or economic order. The arguments are: (1) Perversity: "The change will only exacerbate the problem you are trying to solve."(2) Futility: "The change will achieve nothing, because it fails to acknowledge incontrovertible political, social or economic laws." (3) Jeopardy: "The change will threaten or destroy some cherished previous accomplishment, such as freedom or democracy." Hirschman's approach is historical. Drawing examples from three key periods of reactionary thought - the aftermath of the French Revolution, the nineteenth-century push for universal suffrage, and the more recent rejection of the Welfare State - he tracks the development, deployment and intertwining of the arguments. His study raises some unstated questions about the psychology of conservatism, the tendency of the populous to be drawn in by such arguments, and the ease with which they can be deployed in short soundbites making them ideal for a modern mass media. Unfortunately, Hirschman doesn't address these issues, so if you're interested in exploring them you will need to look elsewhere. (Eduardo Giannettiï's rather advanced psycho-philosophical study, "Lies We Tell Ourselves: The Art of Self-Deception", might be a challenging place to start. Giannetti addresses the issue only tangentially, but he does give a full account of the kind of self-delusion that a lot of conservative thinking requires.) While the three arguments Hirschman describes have been used most often by conservatives, he turns in the final chapters to the occasional tendency of "progressives" to deploy similarly intransigent arguments. Such even-handedness is refreshing. This book will be useful to anyone wanting to promote or defend a progressive agenda as it delineates the likely arcs of resistance you will face, and alerts you to the possibility of woolly thinking infecting your own arguments. It's strongly recommended for conservatives, too. You'll learn that the kind of thinking you find "natural" and "morally right" has a long and hysterical history. This book will have both sides of the table thinking - which is always a good thing.
Undeyn
Great analysis of the foundation of right wing arguments. Still true after all this time. Clear, incisive, and damning.
Nanecele
A superb book providing remarkable insight into political movements it is almost as if one has decoded political behavior and revealed many situations which are reborn continuously. Poignant in todays polarized milieu.
Frostdefender
I think it was Frost who said that poetry tells you something you knoew and didn't know you knew. I have the same sense after reading Hirschman. Much of his schemata of reactionary rhetoric seemed obvious, but then I realized that to state the obvious in its simplest terms and to aggregate the obvious systematically reveals the impoverishment of the reactionary (left and right) position, a negative world-view impervious to nuance. Hirschman took pleasure in small ideas rather than immense ideologies and was skeptical of theory. His writing is poetic -- not florid but closely observed -- which may baffle Hirschman's colleagues in the fields of economics and social science, who expect arcane mathematical abstractions and general rules or principles. Hirschman, though immensely learned in the western canon, championed learning through experience, through trial and error, description in nuance rather than formula, and applauded failure as a valuable means of acquiring knowledge. His antipathy to reaction, which seeks to thwart innovation, change and reform, is gently stated but palpable.
Beazezius
This is a challenging book to get through, but the subject matter proves thought provoking. I'm no scholar but do appreciate putting my mind to work.
The best essay ever written about the excuses Conservatives like to grab in order to stop social conquests.
If you watch Fox News (and sometimes, unfortunately, Obama's speeches) you know what I (and Hischman) say
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