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Download The American Black Chamber (Bluejacket Books) ePub

by Herbert O. Yardley

Download The American Black Chamber (Bluejacket Books) ePub
  • ISBN 1591149894
  • ISBN13 978-1591149897
  • Language English
  • Author Herbert O. Yardley
  • Publisher Naval Institute Press; First Printing edition (January 15, 2013)
  • Pages 376
  • Formats mbr doc lrf txt
  • Category Social Science
  • Subcategory Politics and Government
  • Size ePub 1707 kb
  • Size Fb2 1677 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 861

During the 1920s Herbert O. Yardley was chief of the first peacetime cryptanalytic organization in the United States, the ancestor of today's National Security Agency. Funded by the U.S. Army and the Department of State and working out of New York, his small and highly secret unit succeeded in breaking the diplomatic codes of several nations, including Japan. The decrypts played a critical role in U.S. diplomacy. Despite its extraordinary successes, the Black Chamber, as it came to known, was disbanded in 1929. President Hoover's new Secretary of State Henry L. Stimson refused to continue its funding with the now-famous comment, "Gentlemen do not read other people's mail." In 1931 a disappointed Yardley caused a sensation when he published this book and revealed to the world exactly what his agency had done with the secret and illegal cooperation of nearly the entire American cable industry. These revelations and Yardley's right to publish them set into motion a conflict that continues to this day: the right to freedom of expression versus national security. In addition to offering an exposé on post-World War I cryptology, the book is filled with exciting stories and personalities.

This book is the memoirs of Herbert Yardley who was an American cryptologist who founded and led the cryptographic organization called the Black Chamber.

This book is the memoirs of Herbert Yardley who was an American cryptologist who founded and led the cryptographic organization called the Black Chamber. One example of the code breaking is the 1921 - 1922 Washington Naval Conference, the Black Chamber broke Japanese diplomatic codes and thus were able to furnish this information to American negotiators. The book goes into detail on how the Black Chamber broke certain codes, the real meat and potatoes of cryptology. While this may seem to be a mundane or dull topic to read about, it is truly a fascinating read. Well written and flows well.

American Black Chamber. by. Herbert Yardley, William Friedman. Public Domain Mark . American Black Chamber, Cryptography, Herbert Yardley, William Friedman. This is William Friedman's annotated copy of Herbert Yardley's book American Black Chamber.

Herbert O. Yardley died on August 7, 1958. This book is the memoirs of Herbert Yardley who was an American cryptologist who founded and led the cryptographic organization called the Black Chamber. In 1999, he was given a place in the National Security Agency Hall of Honor.

During the 1920s Herbert O. Yardley was . It's great to see this classic book back in print. Yardley was, as they say, accustomed to luxury, and when fired in 1929 wrote this book on the breaking of foreign codes by the United States

During the 1920s Herbert O. Yardley was chief of the first peacetime cryptanalytic organization in the United States, the ancestor of today's National Security. Yardley was, as they say, accustomed to luxury, and when fired in 1929 wrote this book on the breaking of foreign codes by the United States. Yardley had found a loophole in the law so that he couldn't be prosecuted, but boy did it annoy the Government.

The American Black Chamber is a 1931 book by Herbert O. Yardley. The book describes the inner workings of the interwar American governmental cryptography organization called the Black Chamber. The cryptography historian David Kahn called the book "the most famous book on cryptology ever published. By describing the inner workings of the organization, the book created large interest public awareness of the United States's cryptographic abilities

The American Black Chamber book. During the 1920s Herbert O. Yardley was chief of the first peacetime cryptanalytic organization in the United States, the ancestor of today's National Security Agency

The American Black Chamber book. Yardley was chief of the first peacetime cryptanalytic organization in the United States, the ancestor of today's National Security Agency. Army and the Department of State and working out of New York, his small and highly secret unit succeeded in breaking the diplomatic codes of several nations, including Japan.

The American Black Chamber. In 1931 a disappointed Yardley caused a sensation when he published this book and revealed to the world exactly what his agency had done with the secret and illegal cooperation of nearly the entire American cable industry.

Titled The American Black Chamber, its betrayal of trust rightly drew down the wrath of intelligence and military . Yardley is a cult figure. This book describes the arc of Yardley’s life

Titled The American Black Chamber, its betrayal of trust rightly drew down the wrath of intelligence and military professionals, who refused thenceforth to have ix. PREFACE. This book describes the arc of Yardley’s life. I have sought to embed that life into the context of its times, to infer its motivations, and to say why it matters. The book shows how Yardley’s boyhood demonstrated the imagination and initiative that enabled him to achieve what he did.

Informationen zum Titel American Black Chamber von Herbert O. Yardley aus der Reihe Bluejacket Books [mit . This book is a classic in nonfiction literature. When published in 1931, The American Black Chamber was an instant sensation and quickly became a best-seller. Yardley aus der Reihe Bluejacket Books This book is a classic in nonfiction literature. Erle Stanley Gardner termed the book one of the most interesting books I have ever read. For those interested in real-life spies, intelligence, breaking codes, and especially intrigue, The American Black Chamber is one of the most absorbing nonfiction books ever published. Yardley, one of the greatest authorities on secret codes and ciphers in the 1920s, was inducted into the NSA Hall of Honor posthumously in 1999

Herbert O. Yardley, one of the greatest authorities on secret codes and ciphers in the 1920s, was inducted into the NSA Hall of Honor posthumously in 1999. He is also the author of The Chinese Black Chamber.

Talk about The American Black Chamber (Bluejacket Books)


Mr.mclav
I've read many books on old school cryptography (i.e. generally things up to WWII) and this will be one my more treasured additions. I believe this book has value on two fronts. One is the autobiographical format. While I originally thought that style would make this book tedious given that the author is not exactly a world renown writer and the events all occurred around WWI, that actually made this story so much better. You can see first hand how simple letter frequency calculations that we find so elementary today started out. The second value to this book are the half dozen or so examples of how his department solved a variety of ciphers. He doesn't describe them in too much detail - if you don't already have an understanding of this field then you won't appreciate the book as much - but there are some gems in there that I hadn't come across before. This used and somewhat rare book is a good buy.
LadyShlak
Thee Gospel on ciphers. Published after WW1 which the Japanese used. As a primer for their ciphers for WW2.
That might have been the reason this book wasn't on the public shelves at the Michigan State U. Library. It was in a confidential file somewhere and may have needed special permission to be checked out.
I used the book for a term report on some method of communications. My first choice was codes and ciphers but soon realized ciphers were complicated enough for my report. I probably read a half dozen different books on the subject but in the end, this book was referenced 99% of my report.
A few years ago I listened to a lecture from a retired CIA official at the NSA museum. He stated there was no code breaking by the US during WW1. I questioned him about that as he was presented as a historical expert on codes and ciphers. There was a copy of this book in a case about 50 feet from where he was standing. I think he was a little miffed.
He probably learned a lesson that day about choosing statements in a room full of well read senior citizens.
interactive man
If you are interested in the history of crypto you need to read this book. Yardley wrote this between WWI and WWII and exposed much of the interworking of US communications interception during the period shortly before WWI and thereafter until his group was disbanded. The details, including long passages from intercepts as well as high level explanations of the cracking process were the Snowden leaks of his time, although not illegal at the time. This is all pre-computer and the story is pretty amazing.

It should be said Yardley was a well-known self-promoter so maybe a few personal elements have been exaggerated but in the end the details are worth any possible demerits in the book.
Ballardana
Great book on the origins of US code breaking in the first part of the last century. This book is the memoirs of Herbert Yardley who was an American cryptologist who founded and led the cryptographic organization called the Black Chamber. One example of the code breaking is the 1921 - 1922 Washington Naval Conference, the Black Chamber broke Japanese diplomatic codes and thus were able to furnish this information to American negotiators. The book goes into detail on how the Black Chamber broke certain codes, the real meat and potatoes of cryptology. While this may seem to be a mundane or dull topic to read about, it is truly a fascinating read. Well written and flows well.
Madis
Yardley basically invented USA code and cipher decrypting during World War I. He recruited the smartest scholars he could find -- and learned quickly that what he needed were men -- all men back then, of course -- who could think outside the box -- since he had to figure out how to break codes and cyphers with no training or help.

His group -- known as the "Black Chamber" was so secret that they did not have any sort of pension. After the government decided they didn't need his services any longer -- they were wrong, of course, duh! -- they booted him out with nothing for his old age. "Thanks. Now go away." So he wrote this book. Very interesting read. He even provides some coded messages for the reader to try to solve, using the techniques his team developed.

Fascinating look at not just codes and cyphers but the politics of various governments during peace and war.